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COLLEGE SIGNAL 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEOE 



Vol. XXji 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, SeptenilHtr 19, 1911, 



No. I 



CHANGES IN FACULTY THE YEAR'S INAUGURAL 



Many New Men Fill New Positions and 

Also Positions A^ade Vacant 

by Resignations. 



The trustees of the Massacuhsetts 
Agricultural College at their recent 
meeting in Amherst made a large 
number of appointments to the faculty, 
ali of which will take effect September 
I. 1911. Edward M, Lewis is to be 
assistant professor of English and as- 
sistant dean. Professor Lewis grad- 
uated from Williams college in 1896, 
later receiving from his alma mater 
the degree of master of arts. He 
did considerable work in Harvard uni- 
versity, and finished the course in the 
Boston school of expression, later be- 
coming instructor in elocution at 
Columbia university. Since 1903 he 
has been a member of the faculty of 
Williams college, his special work be- 
ing that of public speaking and oratory, 
Since 1904 he has taught public 
speaking in Yale divinity school. Dean 
Mills will return to his duties Septem- 
ber I , and Professor Lewis will give 
the larger part of his own time to the 
details of the work in the dean*s office, 
although he will also do some teach- 
ing In tne Department of English. 

Prof. Robert J. Sprague is to be 
head. of the division of the humanities 
and professor of economics and socio- 
logy. Professor Sprague received 
nearly all his accademic training at 
Boston university, graduating from 
there In 1897. In 1899 he was 
granted the degree of Master of Arts 
and in 1901 that of Doctor of Philoso- 
phy. He also studied .sociology and 
economics at Harvard University. 
Professor Sprague has had a long and 
successful experience In teaching, hav- 
ing been connected with the Maine 
Wesleyan seminary, with Knox college 
in Illinois, and wtth the University of 
Maine, from which institution he 
comes to the Massachusets Agricul- 
tural College. Professor Sprague has 
also studied social problems in Ger- 
many and in Italy, and has done con- 
siderable work In this country on the 
negro problem and in investigating 
banking history, etc. 

Curry S. Hicks is to be assistant 
professor of physical education, occu- 
pying the position made vacant by the 
recent resignation of Dr. Percy L. 
Reynolds. Mr. Hicks received his 
education chiefly in Michigan, hav- 
ing attended the agricultural college of 
that state and having graduated in 
1909 from the Michigan State Normal 
school. In 1909-10 he studied physi- 
cal education at Amherst College as 
recipient of the Hltckcock fellowship. 



President Buttcrfield Speaks at First 
Sunday Morning Chapel. "Work- 
ing Together" the Watchword 
for This Year. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 

Largest in History of the College. 171 
Registered Up to Last Sat- 
urday Noon. 



iii,t (.f 



(Contlmi«d on page 2] 



The opening Sunday Assembly of the 
year was addressed by Pres. Butter- 
field who offered as the year's watch- 
word "Working Together." 

He said In part as follows. "In 
considering the phase 'working to- 
gether* let us first get at the idea lying 
back of the word woric. In college 
there are many diverse interests ; there 
ought to be no conflict between the 
interests of the class room and of the 
rest of college life. Concentration on 
the subject in hand is the real Idea of 
•work'. I wish the term 'getting by' 
could be eliminated. It Is not the 
question of passing but of developing 
his power that should hold the atten- 
tion of college man. When the man 
who is satisfied with just 'getting by' 
— the 60^ man — gets into the world, 
he finds that 'just getting by' won't 
do. The crucial lest of college men Is 
their coming up to their maximum 
efficiency. 

"The college Is a community ; con- 
sisting not oiiiy of (he ;»tuU*:uiS uiu! 
faculty but of the alumni and of those 
who stand back of the institution. And 
those In the community must work to- 
gether; there can be no advance with- 
out unity. Let us work together In be- 
half of one another. Instead of the 
attitude of opposition and indifference 
adopt thf.t of helpfulness. Our treat- 
ment of those about us Is a matter of 
prime importance. 'The square deal ' 
should work both ways. Let us not 
forget that besides our position as re- 
cipients of rights we owe something to 
others. In no college has the ideal 
been reached until the the two follow- 
ing questions are answered in the 
affirmative : Does our college life on 
the whole make for the uplifting of the 
men here? Is your influence con- 
stantly on behalf of the development 
of the best there is in your fellow 
students ? No matter how large the 
college, unless these questions are 
answered 'Yes,' it is not a good insti- 
tution. It Is for the students to 
answer. 

"Work together for the college, not 
only for the men now here, but for the 
alumni and those who are to come. 
Work together for the Commonwealth. 
The Slate gives you your opportunities. 
Gain the spirit and motive of real 
public service. 

"And above all work together with 
God. Our success in life Is depend- 
ent upon the degree to which we con- 

[ContlnuodoB p»t* 7] 



\< : :;.dale 

Melrose 

Ware 



Following is a compl'-te 
freshmen, 171 in number: 
Ackerman, H. S. Meir o 
Alden, Charles Harold 
Allen, Francis Eliwood 
Anderson. Herbert Henry 
Archibald, Herbert Hiiirrtli Waliham 
Banister, Seth Warreiur Wrstford 
Baird, Earle Falrbank Waitham 

Barnes, Dwlght F. Marshfield 

Bartlett, Emory Haynes Enfield 

Bartletl, Edwara Russell Newburyport 
Bartley, Hastings Newcomb Sandwich 
Baichelder, Harry Conrad Peabody 
Beers. Norman Laner Somerville 

Bemis, Willard Gilbert N. Brookfleld 
Bennett, John Ingraham Boston 

Bisbee. Eleanor Arlington Heights 
Bishop, Cnester A. Peterboro, N. H. 
Bishop, Herbert W. Doyleston, Pa. 
Blttinger, Fritz John Plymouth 

Boyer, Edward Everett Hale Lynn 



Braley, MeVton Loring Rock 

Brederneisr. Carl Buffalo 

Breniian, Edith Dorothy Melrose 

Bronson, Harold Julius Buckhnd 

L>ruv.».-, G«.-I•e^'Mt♦%c; - * T' r. 
Buitrick, John Willard Melrose 

Cale. Gladstone Hume W. Springfield 
Callard. John Case Winlhrop 

Campbell, Malcolm D. Harvard 

Cande, Donald Hopkins Putsfield 

Chase, Alexander b. Jr. W.Barnstable 
Churchill, Chester Albert Brockton 
Clark, Arthur Lincoln Jamaica Plain 
Clark, Eills Fred Granby, Conn. 

Clark, Saxon Dickinson Springfield 
Clough. Maurice Joseph Swampscott 
{Craig, David Wilson Peabody 

jCrowell. Minot Joy Melrose 

j Dalrymple, Andrew Campbell Revere 
Damon, Leon Blanchard Melrose 

Darling, Homer Chester Mendon 

Day, George Allen Warren 

Dole, Sumner A. Bardwelis Ferry 

Donneil. George Edwin Canbou. Me. 
Doran, William L. North Dartmouth 
Draper. Earle Sumner Mllford 

! Eaton. Paul Baker Wakefield 

' Estes, Ralph Gary Lancaster 

Falrbank, Harvey Nathan Sudbury 
I Farrar, Stuart Kitridge Springfield 
I Fales, Gerald Worcester 

! Fisher. Leonard C. Norwood 

i Fitzgerald, Daniel James Worcester 
' Flebut. Alpha John Amherst 

' Fox, Everett Bailey Dracut 

Care. Edward John Northampton 

Gardiner, Ralph Russell Montello 

Gibbs, Robert B. Balston Spa, N. Y. 
Golden, Herman G. Newark, N. J. 
Goodwin, Malcolm N. Newburyport 
Grant, Harold Davidson Melrose 

(ContiniMd on pac* 2.) 



FOOTBALL OUTLOOK 

l^arge Number of Candidates Out. John 

Hubbard o( Amherst to 

Coach. 

Tt,.. f. . tK^ii season is under way 
^n under Coach Hubbard 

md Physical Director Hicks are fast 
^ha; I ,• into iorm for the first game 
Saturday with Rhode Island. It is too 
early in the season to prophecy much 
with rf^gard to the team but it Is easily 
se^n that what is lacking In weight 
will be made up in speed. Practically 
all of last season's team is back except 
Captain Morse who was graduated. 
Several of the new men look good and 
promise to make the old men hustle 
to hold their positions. The following 
are the men out : —- 

19 12 —Captain Walker, Moreau, 
Carpenter, Lloyd, Terry, Dodge. 

1915 —Samson, Larsen. O'Brien. 
Huntington. Gore, Hubert. 

1914— Smith, Nissen. Edgerton, 
Jones. Edwards, Baker. Brewer, Hay- 
den. Jacobs. 

1915- Strauss, Kilbourne, A. John- 
son, Fuller, B. R. Johnson. Mellcan. 
Barrister. Lewi.-;. Jordan, Phillips, 
Wood, Baird, Kelleher, Sauter, 
Whir* L»*Mf*», ' "^vpy, Oarllnp. 



SENATE RULES 

1. As a mark of respect all stu- 
dents are expected to recognize the 
members of the faculty by the military 
salute. 

2. That In addition the members 
of the Freshman class shall, when on 
tne college grounds, recognize the 
TT.emoers of the Senior class In the 
same manner, between Sept. 20th and 
the Christmas vacation. 

3. Freshmen shall not be permit- 
ted to smoke on the college grounds 
save in their rooms until they have 
defeated the Sophomores In some 
regular athletic contest. 

4. Students are expected to dress 
neatly and decently at all times. 
Furthermore members of the Fresh- 
man class shall wear coats at all times 
except when participating in athletics 
or when performing college work. 

5. No student shall wear any pre- 
paratory school letters or numerals 
either on their caps, jerseys or sweat- 
ers while on the campus. 

6. Between Sept. 20th and the 
Christmas vacation Freshmen shall 
appear at all times while in the limits 
of the town of Amherst wearing the 
prescribed Freshman cap. The said 

i cap shall consist of black skull cap with 
a I 1-2 inch green button. 

i 7. Freshman shall do all work con- 
nected with college activities. 

! 8. No Indiscreet writing of num- 
erals on buildings or walks will be 
tolerated. 



The College sif«al. Tuesday. September .9, «9^'- 



The College Signal, Toeaday. September .9. '9 



II. 



CHANGES IN FACTLTY 

[Continued fro m page 1] 



Mr. Hicks was a prominent football 
and baseball player while in college, 
and during the last two years of his 
academic training served as instructor 
In the department of physical educa- 
tion at the Michigan State Normal 
school. Since completing his gradu- 
ate study at Amherst College, Mr. 
Hicks has been director of athletics 
and physical examiner in his alma 
mater. 

Prof. S. F. Howard has been 
granted a leave of abs«nce for the full 
college year. It is understood that 
Professor Howard will spend the year 
in graduate work for the degree of 
doctor of philosophy at John Hopkins 
university. Dr. Charles A. Peters has 
been appointed professor of inorganic 
and soil chemistry. Dr. Peters grad- 
uated from the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College in 1897. In 1901 he 
received the degree of Doctor of Phi- 
losophy from Yale university, where he 
had been studying chemistry at the Kent 
laboratory. For eight years after 
leaving Yale university he occupied the 
position of professor of chemistry at 
the University of Idaho. From 1908 
to 1910 Dr. Peters studied chemistry 
at the University of Berlin, teaching 
the subject in that city during the lat- 
ter year. 

Dr. George E. Gage will be assis- 
tant profeisor of animal pathology. 
Doctor Gage has been employed for 
some time as biologist in the experiment 
station of Maryland. He has had a 
thorough training in animal pathology 
and bacteriology, biology and chemis- 
try. He received his academic train- 
ing at Clark college. Clark university, 
and at Yale university. He also 
studied at the University of Michigan. 
Doctor Gage has done research work 
in bacteriology and in animal patho- 
logy, having published several scienti- 
fic bulletins on these subjects. 

Frederick L. Yeaw is a new assis- 
tant professor in Market Gardening. 
Mr. Yeaw will fill the position made 
vacant by the resignation of Charles 
S. Heller. He graduated from the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College in 
1905, having made while a student 
there a special study of horticulture 
and botany. Since 1906 Mr. Yeaw 
has been connected with the California 
Experiment Station as specialists in 
plant pathology. In this position he 
has made a marked success. 

Arthur K. Harrison will be instruc- 
tor in Landscape Gardening. Mr. 
Harrison will fill the position made 
vacant by the resignation of John 
Noyes. For several years Mr. Har- 
rison has been associated with Warren 
H. Manning, a well-known landscape 
architect of Boston. 

Dr. Chester A. Butman is to be 
Instructor in physics. Dr. Butman 
received his academic training at the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
Clark University and at Yale Univer- 
sity. He also has had some teaching 



experience. Wllfard A. Wattles w.U 
be instructor in English. Mr. Wattles 
is a graduate of the University of Kan- 
sas, having received the degree of 
master of arts from that Institution. 
Other appointments are: William L. 
Harmount, instructor in French ; Elvin 
L. Quaife. instructor in animal hus- 
bandry; William L. Machmer, In- 
structor in mathematics ; Samuel R. 
Parsons of the class 1911. assistant 
In mathematics and military science; 
Frederick A. McLaughlin, a graduate 
of the Massachusetts agricultural col- 
lege in 1911, assistant in botany; Her- 
bert J. Baker, also of the class of 191 1 
of the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, assistant in the department 
of agronomy and secretary to the 
director of the experiment station ; R. 
W. Ruprecht, assistant chemist in the 
feed and fertilizer inspection depart- 
ment of the experiment station. 

Mr. Arthur N. julian has been ap- 
pointed instructor in German at the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Mr. Julian is a graduate of the North- 
western University, has had three years- 
teaching experience in Elgin Academy, 
and has studied and traveled in Ger- 
many for the past fourteen months. 



NEW SNAPPY STYLES 



— IN — 



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many for the past louricc. >^>» - 

Mr. Julian fills a vacancy caused by , y]Q|||^ BaB)0, MudoUB, lid Gvltar SWagl 
the recent rec.ignatlon of Mr. Albert 



Grauer. who was elected to that posi- 
tion in June. 

Mr. Howard D. F. Wldgerhas been 
appointed Instructor in English and 
public speaking at the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College to fill the place 
made vacant by the recent resignation 
of Prof. F. B McKay. Mr. Wldger 
is a graduate of Yale, and has done 
graduate work at Columbia. Mr. 
Widger was a prominent debater while 
in college. 



Fuii lime of Colltge Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



The Worthy. 



FRANK WEBBER. Mr.«. 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



Anbent Corner la RithskelUr. 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



FRESHMAN CLASS 

[Coatlnued (roiTip«g«ll 



Griggs. Raymond B. Chicopee Falls 
Hager. Clayton Marden Somervllle 
Hall, Roderick C. Worcester 

Hall, George M. Brookllne 

Harper, James E. New Haven. Conn. 
Harper, Raymond W. Barre 

Harvey, Russell W. Lanesvllle 

Haskell, Willis H. Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Haskins, LeRoy Everett Taunton 

Hatfield, William H. Wellesley 

Hathaway, Isaac Kingston 

Hawes, Clayton P. North Dartmouth 
Heartz, Oscar F. Melrose Highlands 
Hildreth. Paul Hughes Newtonville 
Hobart, Ralph Edmund N. Amherst 
Hill. Charles C. Melrose Highlands 
Horobin. Hugh Pryer 

Cornwall-on- Hudson, N. Y. 
Houghton, Arthur R. So, Lancaster 
Hyde, George Frederic North Dana 
Jackson, John Carleton Sherborn 

joubert, S. G. Mlddletown, Conn. 

Jordan, Perley Topsfleld 

Kane, Paul V. Worcester 

Karnam, Parker Robert Hyde Park 
Kelleher, Jerome J. Montague City 
Johnson, Arthur Bridgeport, Conn. 
Kellev, Harold R. Haverhill 

Kennedy, Thomas J. So. Hadley Falls 



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Pirn, Palmer, 

Gk>ld Medal, Etc. 



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Diamond Merchants. 



Kllbon, Ralph Glllett Springfield 

Koplovltz, Samuel Chelsea 

Komp, W. H. W. Rutherford, N.J. 
Lane, Merton C. South Duxbury 

LeDuc, Ashley Cudworth Chesterfield 
Lewis, Daniel James Hanson 

Lewis. John K. New Haven. Conn. 
Lincoln, Irving B. Glen Falls, N. Y. 
Little. Harold Greenleaf Newburyport 
Lovejoy, John Sumner Newburyport 
Macy. Philip Arthur Oak Bluffs 

Macdonald, Norman D. Melrose 

Mahan. Harold B. H Ingham Centre 



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SPEOIALISTS IN 

Fraternity Badges, Fobs. Novelties. 

Rings. Charms Pri.es. Trophies. 

Medals College Pins. Fobs, Seals. 

Ringa, Charms.-. 



Mansur, Horace D. 

Marsh. Herbert Verner 

Marsh, Franklin Winter 

Masse, Sidney Merten 

McKechnie. Ray Farrar 

McLain. Ralph Emerson 

Mac Nell, Ralph Langdel 

Mellcan, George D. 

Moberg. Carl David 

Moberg, Eldon Samuel 

Montague. Enos Jones Westhampton 

Moore. Elbert Francis Waltham 

Moore. Roger Henry Beverley 

Murray, John K. Wlnthrop 

Munger. George Draper Worcester 

Navas, Miguel Columbia, S. C. 



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Parmenter, Ernest B. 

Patten, Merrill C. 

Patterson, Robert Earley 

Pendleton, Harlow L. 

Perry, Gerald Eugene 

Peterson, Carl Percival 

Phillips, Ralph Edward 

Pike, Joseph S., Jr. 

Potter, George Raymond 

Po Shue Lo 

Poole, Joseph Ellsworth 

Prise. James Albert 
Prouty, Langdon 
Quincy, Kilght 
Ray. George Burrill 
Rendall, Raymond Eaton 
Rhoades, Paul Whiting 
Rogers, Harold M. Southington, Conn. 
Saben. Maxwell B. Leominster 

Sauter, John Martin Turners Falls 
Sexton, George P. Darien, Corn. 
Scott, George Alvin Clinton 

Scott, Lincoln B. Melrose 

Sears, William Richard Arlington 
Simon, Isaac B. R^^ere 

Simon, Isaac E. BosU>n 

Smith. Francis Albert West Newton 
Smith, Philip L. Lawrence 

Spofford, Chester Porter Georgetowri 
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Tarr Lester Winslow Lanesville 

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PROMPT SERVICE 




The College Signal, Tuesday. September 19. 19" 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 19, 1911. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

ALDEN C. BRETT, 1912 Editor-ln-ChW. 

MARSHALL C. PPATT. 19I2. Assisiant Editor. 
JESSECARPENTER. JR .1912 Maiugine Editor 
ROYAL N. HALLOWELL. 1912. Athletics. 

JOSEPH A. HARLOW. 1912. Athletics. 

SILAS WILLIAMS 191?. Department Notes. 

OSCAR G. ANDERSON. 1913, Alumni No«e». 
R. H. VANZWALENBURG 1913. College Notes. 
S. MILLER JORDAN !913. Collee" Notes. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912, Bo«ne" Marueer. 

GEORGE ZABRISKIE 1913 Asst. Bus. Manager 
ERNEST S. CI ARK. JR., 1914. Circulation. 

CHESTER E. WHEELER. 1914, ClrcuUtlpii. 

STUART B. FOSTER. 1914. C'rcuUtton. 



Subscriprton $1 50 per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Albert W. Dodgb 

Entarad •• Moond-class matter at the Amherst 
PmI Offic*. 

Vol. XXI. TUESDAY, SEKF. 19. No. 1 



With this, the opening number of 
the college year, The Signal extends 
a hearty welcome to the men espec- 
ially to those of the freshman class. 
We now have a registration of about 
500 students, a number which will 
compare favorably with that of other 
colleges. With this increase in num- 
bers however, if we would hold our 
place in the college world, must come 
a corresponding growth in activities. 
We must not give up entirely the 
watchword of last year, 'balance.' 
To keep pace without increased num 
bcrs our athletic teams must hold a 
higher place in the world of college 
sports, our musical clubs must take 
on increased activity, in other words 
we must have 'balance* not only in 
the Individual but in the college as a 
whole. To this end the co-operation 
of every man is necessary. If you 
have any ability In any line of activity, 
come out and help make M. A. C. 
take its rightful place among the col- 
leges of New England. 



COLLEGE NOTES 
Glee club reheasals are scheduled 
for Tuesday and Mandolin club for 
Wednesday nights. 

The new trolly waiting-station at the 
Botany Walk promises to be orna- 
mental as well as useful. 

Only those with the strongest grip 
were able to write a legible hand after 
the first day's glad hand reunion. 

The Freshmen succeeded in getting 
their picture taken on the chapel steps, 
Sunday noon while the Sophomores 
were at dinner. 

A meeting of those interested in 
cross-country running was held Thurs- 
day, and a squad went out for the first 
run Saturday morning. 

John L. Lee, a retired ordnance 
sergeant of 30 years' experience, has 
been appointed assisiant to the mili- 
tary detail of the college. 

Our modern Garden of Eden i.s 
being jealously guarded through the 



fruit season by three Argus-eyed bull- 
dogs of the law. "Oh for the good 
old days!" 

The local chapter of Kappa Sigma 
has moved from its quarters on Lin- 
coln avenue into its newly acquired 
house on Peasant street, formerly the 
Cottage hospital. 

The changes in the Union room as 
outlined in the Signal last June have 
been almost completed, and have 
greatly improved facilities for a 
stronger college organization. 

Have you your campus post-office 
bcx? If all the boxes are rented the 
college is practically assured of four 
deliveries daily in place of the present 
three, besides two on Sundays. 

The Y. M. C. A. Hand-books were 
distributed Monday inorning after 
chapel. The book has been changed 
somewhat, and forms a very handy 
and attractive guide for Freshmen and 
others as well. 

The campus has b^en greatly 
improved during the summer by the 
laying of concrete walks. The college 
intends to replace all the old walks with 
concrete, in time, and so to remedy 
former wretched conditions. 

Dr. James B. Paige has recently 
been chosen chairman of the division 
of Science at the Agricultural Col- 
lege. Dr. Paige was nominated to 
this position by the heads of the vari- 
ous departmeii's comprising the divis- 
ion of Science. 

Officers for the coi..*.5^g year were 
elected as follows by the Mub.'^-^l asso- 
ciation: President. F. B. Hills "r^l: 
secretary and treasurer, J. B. Cobb 
'13 and Manager J. D.French '13. 
Leaders of the different clubs are as 
follows: Glee, F. D. Griggs '13; 
Mandolin, S. M. Jordon '13 and 
Orchestra, J. C. Hutchinson '14. 

The squad of 35 that reported last 
Saturday to Coach Hubbard and Phys- 
ical Director Hicks, gives promise of 
a stronger football team than usual. 
Tne freshiTian condidates. while good, 
might be more numerous. The first 
game will be played on the campus on 
Saturday with Rhode Island State. 

H. F. Jones '13 has been appointed 
Assistant Manager and J. P. Palmer 
'14 Assistant Advertising Manager of 
the Dramatic society. A New York 
New Jersey trip is being arranged for 
the first week of the holidays. Sev- 
eral plays are now under consideration 
and active work will shortly commence. 
Tne freshman night shirt parade on 
Thursday evening vas an entire suc- 
cess inasmuch as 1915 showed the 
desired submissiveness and docility 
and was held in line by the sophs until 
the return to the Chapel. The pro- 
cession was headed by an impromptu 
band and two wagons loaded with sen- 
iors and juniors. A stop was made 
in front of the Amherst house, a suc- 
cessful flashlight of the gathering taken 
and after various more or less credit- 
able (?) speeches from the freshmen 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 




And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



It's a good thing not to worry about 
your pedal apparel, its correct, style 
comfort or durability. 

Buy your shoes from 

The Shop M Has TI18 Slylii 

" Walk Over," Haywood Shoes, 

$3. 50, $4-00, $500 



BoUes " Special, " Stetson Shoes, 

$5.00 to $8.00 



E WELL'S 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUG5 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En 
gland of S|>ecial Stutlent Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

and 

toR?ET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



KKPAIKINU DEPARJMtM 

B.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Next to Corner Drug Store. 



Angier, '13. 



Clark, '13. 



Wc have a full line of Banners, Post 
Cards, College Songs, Seal Papers, Foun- 
tain I'ens, Candy, Tonic and Student 
.Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

HASKMENT OF NO COLLEGK 



Eldridge, '14. 



Tarbell, '14. 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Block 
Amherst, Mass. 



Carptn-ter & Morehous?, 

PRINTERS. 



No I, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



H. E. KINSMAN, 

College Pbotograpber 

NA81I BLOCK, MAIN ST., 

AMHERST, :: MASS. 

High-grade artistic work. Perfect satisfactioti guaranteed. 

Studio newly equipped with large sky light 

and special lense for large 

groups. 



the return to the Chapel was made. 
There were about 140 men In line 
and additional spice was lent to the 
occasion by the many efforts to break 
up the parade. 



A quartet from the Mandolin Club 
furnished music and the reception 
closed with the singing of the college 
songs by the assembled students. 



ROPE PULL 

The annual tug-of-war across the 
pond between the Sophomores and 
Freshmen look place last Friday after- 
noon and resulted in a victory for the 
class of 1915. Sixty men were chosen 
from each class to pull. The Sopho- 
mores had the choice of sides and took 
their place on the west side of the 
pond, the Freshmen taking the east 
side. Referee Gordon fired the start- 
ing pistol at 4-25 and the second pistol 
was fired seven and one half minutes 
later; which announced that the Ust 
wet Sophomore had passed through the 

pond. 

At first it looked as though the 
Sophomores had everything their own 
way for they got the Freshmen on the 
pull and took in about 30 feet of rope, 
but this was soon stopped and every- 
thing went the other way. The Fresh- 
men, by the tug-of-war, are entitled to 
display their class banners In their 
rooms and on the camptis. 



9-25. 

7-55 

1-20. 

1-30. 

2-15. 

2-40- 



FOOTBALL COACH 

John Hubbard, the new football 
coach engaged for the present season 
is an athlete who needs no introduction 
to the students of this college. He 
was graduated from Amherst college 
in 1907 where he played varsity foot- 
ball four years and was ch:.sen all 
American full 

1906. Since graduation Hubbard has 
been coaching at the oiher end of the 
town, being head coach for two years 
and advisory coach last year. 

He has had our team In hand the 
past week and his work is such as to 
gain the confidence of all the men and 
the team Is being rapidly whipped Into 
shape for the first game Saturday. 
Manager Pearson Is to be congratu- 
lated on obtaining such a man as Hub- 
bard for coach this season, 



AMENDMENTS TO SCHEDULE 

FlSST SEMESTER, 1911-1912. 
Chapel— Mondays and Fridays all the Semester. 

7-55. First bell. 
8-02. Second bell 
8-20 Class bell. 
8 30. Clas-ses. 

Sunday Chapel -Beginning N'^u. 5th, 

9-15. First bell. 

Second bell. 

Wednesday. 

Freshmen in chapel— College Life. 

Assembly— first bell. 

Assembly— second bell. 

First bell for drill. 

4-30. Drill. 
Fvrenoon program Tuesdays and Thursdays 
until Thanksgiving. 

7-55. First class bell 
8-05- 8-50 First class period 
9-00 — 9-45. Second class period. 
9-55 — 10^40. Third class period. 
10-50— 1 1-35. Fourth class period. 
1 1-50. Drill begins. 
12-20. Drill ends. 

After Thanksgiving. Tuesday and Thurs- 
day class periods same as Monday and Fri- 
day, including chapel. 

Office hours of administrative officers 
President. 2-5 p. m.. except Saturday. 
Dean. 9-12 a. m.; 2-4 p. m.. except Saturday 
Registrar, 2-4 p. m.. except Saturday. 



Balanced and Specialized Fertilizers 



Well-balanced, specialized fertilizers, containinK the rijiht amounts 
of available nitrogen, in both chemical ami organic f..nns. w.lh an excess 
of soluble and reverted phosphoric .tcul. both for (ertil./.nti ami citaly/. 
in" effects, and the proper amount and right form of potash, all tliorough- 
Iv^blended together and in forms that will not cake, but remain in a 
drillable condition, and svhich will act not on y n. the beginning, bu 
throughout the season (fertilizers based upon the nee< Is of the crop aiul 
market requirements), are what the practical farmer should rely upon in 
growing commercial crops. Alx-ve all things, he should avoid un- 
balanced and improper mixtures that have the defect of one elemen 
being insoluble and another element too soluble for successful i>lant 
irrowth Think of this when considering home mixing. 

Itismuch the same with modern fertilizers as it is with modern 



medicine. As a rule the best phvsicia.is do not semi their patients to a 
drng store with prescriptions to be made up. They are prescribing mix- 
tures already made up to certain known standards and formulas by 
large manufacturing drug h<.uses of whom tliere are perhaps a Ho/.en m 
the United States. In this way they get the drugs they vant. th»; for- 
mulas thev want and the conditions in which t... y want them. 1 hese 
torr'^ubs ' represent the crystalli-^ experience of thou.sands o( 
physic....- indealing with »-^ , conditions. In cntica j «;<"%P''>'*'';,^'''; 

ao not put ti.rw ....... ... prescriptions made up in small lots of uncerl.i.n 

chemicals by local druggists. Can the farm- . .dh.ni to mix doses for his 
crops even if he knows his ingredients? 



BOWKER 



Fertilizer Company 

43 Chatham St. Boston 




A 



MEN'S STORE 



RUSHING RULES 

1 . The rushing season shall open 
the day college opens. 

2. The rushing season shall end at 

6 o'clock on Sunday evening the 1 9th 

' ".'" "'" , of November. 

back for the season of "' i. m i ^ ^ ,i„„ 

3. Freshmen shall pledge during 

chapel on the second Monday before 
Thanksgiving. 

4. Canaid^tes for fraternities must 
be undergraduates, and must also be 
candidates for a four year degree. 

5. The rushing of Freshmen is to 
be done only by the undergraduate 
members of the fraternities of this 
college. 



Kuppenheimer's 
Fine Clothes 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



Y. M. C. A. RECEPTION. 

The annual reception given to the 
Incoming freshman by the Y. M. C. 
A., was held Friday evening In the 
Chapel. Altho many of the Fresh- 
man were not present, a large number 
of the faculty and upper classmen 
turned out for the evening. 

As usual the members of 1915 were 
tagged and spent the evening In mak- 
ing the acqualntence of their class- 
mates and the upper classmen. To- 
ward the close of the evening Presi- 
dent Butterfield, Assistant-dean Lewis, 



Y. M C. A. NOTE 

Every man In college, no matter 
what his religious belief, Is invited to 
attend our regular Y. M. C. A. meet- 
ings on Thursday evenings. The 
Association stands for all that Is best 
in college and It Is here that we can 
best unite that "working together" 
spirit for the greatest interest to our 
college community, 

RESOLUTIONS 



Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOM TMIORING A SPECIALTY 

Thomas llE.MtNWAV, '12, M. .\. C. Kcpu Ncnt.ttivc 



FRANK S. O'bRIEN 
LIVERY, FEED AND HACK 





Hacks for Funerals, Weddings, Parties 

8 Pearl St., Near Union Sta. 

NORTHAMPTON, • - MASS. 

T«l«phone 



Wc Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Fosters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Whereas. God in His infinite wisdom has 
taken unto Himself our beloved classmate 
and comrade. Kennith French Anderson, 
we his friends and classmates do draw up 
these resolutions ; Be It 

Resoliied, that we. the members of the 

I clasa of 1908. do deeply feel the loss we 

Professor Hurd, Professor Gordon and I have sustained in the death of Kennith 
' ' , .u i French Anderson and shall ever cherish 

Professor Mackimmle spoke on the j Jj.^ ^^^^^^ Be it also 

sphere of the Y. M. C. A., in college! Resolved, that we send a copy of these 

Uf. a„d emphasized Its need for strong, '^'^^r^^^l .Tl^! ^Ht,*!"^";, 

915 on *^ 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



All styles the latest. 



Fine picture framing. 



versatile men. In welcoming 
behalf of the association, President 
Madison apologized for the delay In 
getting out the handbooks and prom- 
ised their distribution the early part of 
next week. 



further 

Resolued, that these resolutions be placed 

upon the minutes of the class and that a 
copy ht sent to the College Signal. 

John Robert Parker, 5 For the 

Harry Milliken Jennison, > Class of 

James Augustus Hyslop, ) 1908. 



THE OLD CORP DRUB STORE. 



H. W. FIELD 

... PI^ORISI^ ... 



Roses, Violets, Carnations 



OPP. ACADKMV OF MUSIC, 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 19, 191 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 19, 191 1. 



, • .J^ Ar.«s^*^A:A*,^^-v*..^iA..*v*^'^^ 

•*s^*!ik.\,^ik,V t.xx;<..'- v.-vAA-^-*.*,.',. •.,■-, .*.-*.- 

GOODS FOR MEN. 




C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 

>) English and Scotch Woolens. 

-~^^>i TH£ BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 



m 



WHY NOT SUBSCRIBE 



lu I UK 



SATURDAY 
EVENING POST 

College RiprcMi.t.itivc. 

I,. S. Frkki>man, *i4 



^E. N. PARISEAU,j» 

HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 

RAZORS HONKlJ 



OUTDOOR RIFLE SHOOT 

In the outdoor rifle match held last 
June at Wakefield the M. A. C. team 
was the winner scoring 791 points out 
oi a possible 900. thus breaking the 
previous record by nine points. Har- 
vard was second with Tech. third. 
I'his is the second time we have won 
the outdoor championship match which 
entitles us to keep the trophy for 
another year. 

The indoor team also had great 
success, winning the intercoiltgiate 
championship and breaking many old 
records. A score or 1915 out of a 
possible 2000 was made by the team 
against Georgia University, this 
being 18 points more than was ever 
made before by any college team. 
This gives an idea of the high standard 
that must be sought this year in order 
to ke«-p the trophies. The team is 
handicapped by the loss of five of its 
best men who graduated last June. 
Their places must be filled by new 
material and It Is hoped that a large 
number of Freshmen as well as men 
from the other classes will come out 
to try for the team. It is planned to 
start the season earlier than usual in 
order to give new men a chance to 
show their ability. 




COX SONS 



AND 



VINING 

262 - 4th Avenue, New York 



GAPS and GOWNS 

BEST MATERIALS and 
WORKMANSHIP 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Ma&s. 



No. 2 Plca.'yint, 5t., Amherst, MaM. 



M.O.tilLMAN. C. A MorrKT. 

TELHPHONh 1079-3. 

OILMAN and M OFFET. 

.Manufacturers of and Whok-s.ile Scalers 

CONFECTIONERY. 

fCn tutu MaIW S'TKEBT. 

Worcester, Mass. 



FOR FARMS ! 

Big, Little ur Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building Lots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W R BROWN 

Savings Bank Hl'k, 

Amherst. • ^***®* 



M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amh^tst Hou»e will receive 
prompt •ttentlon. 



STKAM H TTING. Telephone S9-4 

GAS FM TING. TINNING 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PL UMBER S. 

Specialty of KepairinK 

CHlfRCH WiNrKJWS, 

Memorial VVinhows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 
6 Clifton Ave., AMHEK.ST. MASS 



E.B DICKINSON D.D.S. 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 
OwcB Hours: 



ALUMNI NOTES 

•88. —Thomas Rice was married to 
Miss Flora Newell Walters of Fall 
River, Saturday, Aug. 1 9th. 

•90.-_Born to Mr. and Mrs. David 
Barry, at Amherst, July 15. 191 1, a 
daughter. 

•94. The state board of agricul- 
ture In its crop report for August in- 
cludes an article by Henry M. Howard 
of West Newion on growing beans, 
corn, tomatces, lettuce and spinach as 
market garden crops. Mr. Howard 
treats these crops in a practical man- 
ner giving fuil directions for their 
planting, culture, harvesting, etc. 

»Q3 y/. V. Tower is author of 

Bulletin No. 10 of the Porto Rico 
Experiment Station, entitled "Insects 
injurious to citrus fruits, and methods 
for combatting them." 

•04 and '08.— Prof. M. A. Blake, 
with A. J. Farley, is author of Bul- 
letin 236 of the New Jersey Experi- 
ment Station, entitled "Spraying ex- 
periments with peaches." 

'07. j. F. Eastman reports that 

the usefulness of the Morrisvllle. N. 
Y. State School of Agriculture is 
steadily increasing. Professor East- 
man, in charge of the agronomy 
department, not only has general 
teaching duties to perform, but is also 
engaged in lecturing to short course 
students, besides handling a large 
amount of correspondence based upon 
practical questions of every-day 

! farming. 

•08.— William F. Turner is the 
proud father of a baby girl, born June 

12. 1911. 

•08.— Winthrop Cummings has 
changed his address to 721 Belden 
Ave., Chicago. 111. 



Wright &Ditson 



Headquarters 
for 



Athletic Supplies 



}"ar„"r:.L. College Students 

&,na want the real, si- 
FieidMM>ri> pgfiof articles for 

the wrious sports^^ 
should Insist upon"* 
those bearing the 
Wright & DItson 
Tnde Mark 

Catalogue Free 



Wright & Ditson 



334 Washington St. 
Boston 

New York , . Chicago 

San Francisco 
Profidence Cambrldp 




AMHERST 

Chp Laundry 

Laundry Work and Cleaning 

& Pressing Rightly 

Done 

Agent for Laundry, H. W. Blaney, '11, 
C. S. C. House. 

Agent for I'ressing, E. L. Winn, 87 
Plea.sant St. 

Team collects Mondays and Thursdays, 
Delivers Thursdays and Saturdays. 



AN INVITATION 

The students of M. A. C. are cor- 
dially invited to the Amherst churches 
the Sunday services of which ars as 
follows: 

CATHOLIC. 

Isl Mass 8-30. 

2d Mass 10-30. 

Sunday-school 9-15 

Evening service at 7-30 after Oct. I. 

'CONGREGATIONAI., NORTH AMHERST. 

Preaching 10-45. 
Sunday-school 12-00. 
Preaching 7-00. 
Y. P. S. E. 7-45. 

CONGREGATIONAL. EAST AMHERST. 

Preaching 10-45. 
Sunday-school 12. 
Y. P. S. C. E. 7-00. 

CONGREGATIONAL, SOUTH AMHERST. 

Preaching 10-45. 
Sunday-school 12-00. 
Y. P. S. C. E. 7-00. 

CONGREGATIONAL. CENTER. 

Preaching ICM5. 
Sunday-school l(KX). 
Y. P. S. C. E. 7-00. 

BAPTIST. CENTER. 

Preaching 10-45. 
Sunday-school 12-00. 
Y. P. S. C. E. 6-30. 
Evening 7-50. 

METHODIST, MAIN ST. 

Preaching 10-45. 
Sunday-school 12-00. 
Epworth League 6-80. 
Evening 7-80. 

UNPTARIAN, NORTH PLEASANT ST. 

Evening service 7-00. 

EPISCOPAL. 

No services at present. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
camations,violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

ij Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



'08.— H. K. Hayes is part author 
of Bulletin 168 of the Connecticut 
Agricultutal Experiment Station, enti- 
tled "Improvement in corn." 

'08.— Carlton C. Gowdey will be in 
the United States during the early part 
of October. After visiting his home 
In Barbados he will return to Entebbe, 
Uganda Protectorate, British East 
Africa. 

'08.— Kennlth French Anderson 
was drowned on or about May 18, 
1911, near Valderama in the Philip- 
pine Islands, while fording the Gan- 
garanon river. A sudden rise In the 
river overtook him and swept him and 
his horse over forty feet of rapids into 
a pool below. The body was probably 
carried to sea by the current and was 
not recovered. His work in the 
Islands as supervisor of schools Is 
spoken of In the highest terms by 
those In authority. 

NINETEEN-ELEVEN. 

A partial list of the addresses of the 
class of 191 1 is as follows: 

Park W. Allen, Insurance, real 
estate, Investments, with S. A. Allen 
& Son, Westfleld. 

H. J. BaKer. assistant in Agronomy, 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
Amherst. 

Charles M. Damon, teacher, Am- 
herst High school, Amherst. 

A. R. Jenks. 120 Pleasant street. 
Supervisor Correspondence Courses. 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, 

Amherst. 

E. A. Larrabee, assistant to Dr. 
Stone, Massachusetts Experiment 
btation. Amherst. 

F. A. McLaughlin, assistant In 
Botany, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, Amherst. 

S. R. Parsons, assistant in Mathe- 
matics and Military Science, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College, Amherst, 

G. E. Laboutely, fruit farm. Wen- 
atchee. Wash. 

R, D. Lull, farm manager. Dalton 

P. H. Prouty, Shrewsbury, 

R. L. Whitney, superintendent, 
Edwin Ginn estate, Winchester. 

R. H. Patch, Wenham. 

H. B. Morse, head of Science 
department. Proctor Academy. Ando- 
ver. N. H. 

G. P. Nickerson, with South Belt- 
ing Co., 40-46 South Forsyth St., 
Atlanta, Ga. 

E. L. Winn, chemist. Carteret, 
N.J. 

\. W. Davis has been connected 
with the state inspection of bees eur- 
ing the past summer. He has 
accepted the gositton of •'^^^'■^uj;'^'' °* 

Agronomy and Pomology, •"-'-"-^ 

college, Middlebury, Vt. 



,-.v...-. ■■...■. ' . ■ ■..■. I .... ■ ■..,.- ;.....vv.-...-. . ' " ' ' -. '' ".:-.:.:'. ' 



FATIMA 

„TURKISH 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



Middlebury 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from I A. M. to 4 A. M. 



««THE YEAR'S INAUGURAL." 

[Continued fr^m page 1 1 

form to eternal Laws. Let us hope 
that as never before there will be here 
a spirit of real work, laboring In a 
spirit of kindness for the college and 
the Commonwealth, with God as the 
Partner in the building of our charac- 
ters." 





With each packape of 
Falima you get a pen- 
nant coupon, 25 of 
toluih tecure a hand' 
tome felt college 
pennant (12x32}— 
ttleclion oj 100, 



k 



.^. DLEND _ 

CIGARETTES 

MINING 

A good prospect is soon 
discovered to be a rich find 
if you start smoking Fa- 
timas. When assayed they 
reveal only rare tobaccos 
blended to produce a disr 
tinctly "difocnt" taste. 
Come fellows,getrich quick, 
dig up some silver and 
buy gold, for Fatimas are 
nuggets of intrinsic value. 
And their goodness is sui- 
prising. 

They cost only 1 5 cents 
for 20, which gives you 10 
additional. 
THE AMETIICAN TOBACCO CO. 



OS 



Orchards Pay Better Than Gold MInea When Fertilized WWl 

GENUINE THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER! 

The M«Mchus*tt» State Board of Agriculture Offered a frixe U^ the »4o,t ••'•'•^•ble Acre of 
M ass ichusetts Or<Aanl*. ThU Contest Has Recntly Llo»ed, and the 

PRIZe IS WON BY THR OREW-MUNSON FRUIT CO.. of l.ltlWIon. Mm»: 

Their Prize Winning Acrcof Baldwin Apples 
GAVE TMEM A TOTAL RETURN OP $7I».70-THR NET PROMT WA« f8l9.55 



^l!.V\VL".ill('."»^V.1fiE|IBHiE THOmilS PHOSPHITE POWDEB.^oL.l^y'p'^VALK: 



The F.ll.w.n? l.-tt-^r From Birne, Brother,, the Famou. Kruit (irowers and OrchardiM.of 

Yale«r>lle. Conn.. Show* lh.at Thomai Phosphate Powder BnnRS a Prize to 

Every User in the Form of a ProfJtaW* Crop : 



Tmr Cor-Mohtimeu Company, 

Gentlemen: ^, .i ., « v _ 

1 n regard to Thomas Photphatt Poifder, 

you will recall that we bouRht of you last vear 
ito tons an<l we wish to say that it gave us mesl 
exiellfHt results. < »n our |.e«ch orchard where 
we used it, the trees made a sfilendtit grrowth 
With heavy dark green foliage, the fruit was o/\ 
exeelleni color, and the keePiHg\qualittes werere-i 



markahle. whtch was a big advantage, esjietial- 
ly when we had uver no cars to harvest in about 
/7M ay?*! :»s we ha-i this year. aj^j,,^. 

W* never saw better colored Baldwin Applet 
than those we^grerr tthert we applied a good 



le g. - - - 

\dressing of Thomaf Phosphate 
best told at retail for pi.oo Per barrel. 



'on-der. Th* 



Yours truly, 

Baknks Brotui r«!. 



THERE IS A TRUTH IN ALL THIS FOR YOU I 

The whole story is told in the New Kdilion of nur Ho.klet. ' I'p '" H.ite 
FruitGrowing," which is sent free if you mention I hk Oui i. i -i.nM-. 

The Coe-Mortimer Co.,>f,r(f,^rERs 5 » Chamber St., N. Y. City 

We also distribute from Boston. Mass.; Bbi-fast, Maine; Baitimorr, 
Mn.; PHiLA.. Pa.; Norfolk. Va.; Savannah. Ga.; Chari.ston, S. C. 



8 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 19, 191 1. 



m. J. Laporle, Inc. 



f'roprittors of 



flDrO-LllfEBT-IIOBSE 



Tel. 183. 



Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 



ASK YOUR 

STATIONER 

FOR 




Ward's Fountain Tens, Fine Papers 
and Knvelopcs, Students' Supplies. 
Send for samples of Kny;raved Invita- 
tions, class and Fraternity Paper, 
Banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, &c. 

SAMUEL WARD CO., 
Wla rA 'c 57-«3 Franklin Street. 

▼ ▼ mxU o boston. 



DUDLEY 

OUTFITTER IN 

Fine Athletic Goods 

FOR EVERY SPORT 

We clothe the best Hase Ball Teams 
in America. We make the ''Dudley" 
Superior Shaker Sweaters which are 
to day the Standard Sweaters of the 
world. We specialize in Complete 
College and Professional Team Kquip- 
ment. Uniforms, Base Balls, Bats, 
Shoes, etc, etc. Special Quotations 
to Clubs and Team Managers. 

Write for cataioge. 



Ciiarles H. Dudley 



HANOVKK, 



N. H. 



BASSALOTTI & GENTASO 

FRUIT. 

CONFECTIONERY. 
SOOA AND 

ICE CREAM. 

KR1CKS TO TAKE MUMR. 

CORNEk AMU V St PI.KAS A NT STREETi* 



JOHN WOJTAZCZYK 



Boot & Shoes Repaired 

FIRST CI.AS» WORK 

Amherst, - - . Mass. 



BOYDEN'S 



Restaurant and Bakery 

Catering 
a Specialty 

196-200 Main St., Northampton, Mass. 



THE 



Massacltusetts Agricultural Gollese 

Offer a thorough training in agricultural 
vocations that are not yet over crowded, 
and in which there are constantly increas- 
ing opportunities for employment. 

NECESSARY EXPENSES MODERATE 

LOCATION OF COLLEGE IDEAL 

ATTENDANCE RAPIDLY INCREASING 

Complete Catalog for 191 1 Now Ready for 
Distribution. Send for a Copy. px> >> [> 



KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 



AMHERST. MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association. 

Nineteen Hundred and Twelve Index, 

Nineteen Hundred and Thirteen Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club, 

M. A. C. Dramatic Society, 

Debating Society. 

Public Speaking Council, 



H. C. Walker, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

C. C. Pearson, Manager 

R. T. Borden, Manager 

R. T. Beers, Manager 

H H. Wood, Manager 

S. M. Jordan, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

O. G. Anderson, Manager 

F. S. Madison, President 

L. S. Caldwell. President 

J. D. French, Manager 

W. J. Weaver, President 

E. R. Lloyd, President 

W. J. Birdsall. President 

J. M. Heald, President 

T. J. Moreau, President 



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THE COLLEGE SIGN.\L 



Vol. XXII. 



MASSACHUSETTTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, September 26, 1911. 



REDIVISION OF COURSES 

Departments of Instruction as Recently 

Changed, with a Complete List of 

Members of the Faculty. 



TRUSTEE MEETING 



TRACK OUTLOOK 



Several Important Matters Decided at , M«ny Candidates for Cross Country 



.1 



No. 2 



I DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE. 

/ Agronomy. 
James A. Foord. Head of Division. 
Sidney B. Haskell, Assistant Prof. 
William P. Brooks, Lecturer. 
Herbert J. Baker, Assistant. 

2 Animal Hnsbandry. 
John A. McLean. Associate Prof. 
Elvln L. Quaife, Instructor. 

3 Dairying. 
W. P. B. Lockwood, Associate Prof. 
G. F. E. Story, Ext. Instructor. 

4 Farm kdministration. 
James A. Foord. Professor. 

5 Poultry Husbandary. 
John C. Graham, Associate Prof. 

II DIVISION OF HORTICULTURE. 

Frank A. Waugh, Head of Division. 

/ Floriculturg. 
Edward A. White, Professor. 

2 Forestry. 
FraiiK F. Moon, Associate Prof. 
Frank W. Rane. Lecturer. 

J L.::Jsc,\ f^^rJening 

Frank A. Waugh. Professor. 
Arthur K. Harrison, Instructor. 
4 Market Gardening. 
Frederick L. Yeaw, Assistant Prof. 
5 Pomology. 

Fred C. Sears, Professor. 

Alvah J. Norman, Ext. Instructor. 

Ill DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 

James B. Paige. Chairman of Division. 

/ Botany, 
George E. Stone. Professor. 
A. Vincent Osmun, Assl.Mant Prof, 
F. A. McLaughlin, Assistant 

2 Chemistry. 
Joseph B. Llndsey, Professor. 
Charles Wellington, Professor. 

j. S. Chamberlain, Associate Prof. 
Charles A. Peters, Assistant Prof. 
William A. Turner, Assistant. 
Harold S. Adams, Grad. Assistant. 

3 Entomology. 
Henry T. Fernald, Professor. 
Guy C. Crampton, Associate Prof. 
Burton H. Gates, Assistant Prof. 
William S. Regan, Grad. Assistant. 

4 Mathematics. 
John E. Ostrander. Professor. 
C. Robert Duncan. Instructor. 
William L, Machmer, Instructor. 
Samuel R, Parsons, Assistant. 

5 Physics. 
Philip B. Hasbrouck, Professor. 
Chester A. Butman. Instructor. 



the Last Meeting. 

The Trustees in their last meeting 
adopted a plan for the administrative 



Good Schedule Planned for 
this Year. 



The track season this fall will open 
organization of the various departments I under quite favorable conditions. 
of Instruction. The general Idea is to With but two men of last year's team 



FOOIJALL 

Rhode Island State Team Wins in 
Loosely Played Ga\ne on Cam- 
pus Last Saturday. 



divide the organized teaching depart 
ments of the college Into certain 
divisions, each of which shall have a 
head or chairman. It Is thought that 



lost by graduation and with abundant 
material in the freshman class which 
only needs development, the prospect 
for a successful season seems good. 



both m the organization of the teach- 1 The scheduk which has been arranged 



Ing and in the business administration 
of the Institution this plan has manliest 
advantages. Departmental Integrity, 
however, will be retained. 

The following vote was passed con- 
cerning the relationship of the college 
with Boston university. 

Whereas, the trustees of Boston 



Is somewhat larger than usually 
Among other events Is a cross country 
run with Tufts on Oct. 28, at 
Amherst. 

The schedule for indoor 
still Incomplete but Is expected to 
meet the approval of the students. 
Outdoor events have also been 



University on June 6. 1911, adopted I arranged to take place In the spring 
recommendations annulling the agree- , and the opportunities are such as to 
ment between the governing bonds of 1 call out every man who has any ability 
Boston University and the Massachu- In track work. 



setts Agricultural College, with the 
request that a similar action be taken 
by the trustees of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, therefore be It 
resolved, that the agreement thus 
made In 1 875 be and hereby is abro- 
gated: re:iOived. further, (hat a copy 
of this vote be sent to the secretary of 
the beard of trustees of Boston Univer- 
sity, and that the president of this 
college be authorized to Indicate to 
the president of Boston university the 
sincere appreciation for all courtesies 
received from the university. 

Plans were adopted for the convey- 
ance of the property of the college to ' 
the commonweahh In accordance with 
a recent law passed by the Legislature. 
The trustees also voted to adopt the 
recommendations which had been 
passed by the trustees' committee on 
buildings and grounds, that the college 
should permit and encourage the erec- 
tion of fraternity rooming houses. 
Tentative plans were adopted regard- 
ing the proposed agricultural building, 
and the committee on buildings and 
grounds was authorized to have archi- 
tects' plans and builders' specifications 



List Saturday Rhode Island State 
won its first victory ovtr M. A. C. 
here on the campus by the small 
margin of 5-0. The visitors scored 
the only touchdown of the game in the 
third period, when Doll carried the 
ball over the line. Sullivan failed to 
kick the goal. The game started at 
3-10 when Walker kicked off to Sulli- 
van, who after .successfully dodging 
the team, was downed by Gore on the 
50-yard line. Our team held the 
meets Is { visitors for downs and received the ball 
on the 40yard line. Jones received 
a forward pass and gained 20 yards, 
we then lost the ball on an Incompleted 
forward pass. A line plunge and an 
end run netted Rhode Island 10 yards, 
then Sullivan punted to Brewer who 
fumbled and Rhode Island recovered. 
Rhode Island failed to gain the first 
down, Jones made a sensational tackle 
throwing Newton back lor 8 yards. 
Sullivan then punted to Brewer who 
made a fair catch. Little ground was 
then gained by either team And the 
f-^ilod ei.d..i -;tl. »!.w^ ball oj. Rhode 
Island's 20-yard line. The second 
period started with Sullivan punting to 
Gore who advanced the ball 8 yards. 
Burden out for two minutes. Nlssen 
advanced the ball 8 yards and Gore 
made first down. Two Incomplete for- 
ward passes gave Rhode Island the ball 
on t heir 40-yard line . J ones recovered 
for M. A. C. on a fumble and a for- 
ward pass to Larsen netted 10 yards. 
Two more Incomplete forward passes 
gave the ball to Rhode Island. Smith 
replaced Gore and stopped Sullivan 
TAKE NOTICE | after a 12-yard gain on a fake punt. 

II Moreau recovered for M. A. C. on a 

For the past two years, our college. | •^o'^"" ^^ lu_j. i,i-„^ ..-.«„-,.«^ 

represented by the Stockbridge Club, 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

(Notices for this Mluma should be dropped In the 
Smmal Office or hea<ie<l to M. C. Pratt 12, oa or 
bolero the Saturday precedlnf each laaoo.J 



Sept. 

Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept 
Sept 



26—7-00 p. M. Stockbridge 
Club, Agricultural Recitation 
Room. All members are re- 
quested to be present. 

27— 1-30P. M. Assembly. Mr. 
George S. Ladd, Sturbrldge. 

28—6 45 P. M. Y. M. C. A. 
Meeting In the Chapel. * 

29 — 6-30 P. M. Anniversary 
Night. Draper Hall. 

30— Football. M. A. C. vs. 
Dartmouth at Hanover, N. H. 
6-30 P. M. Social Union 
entertainment. Drill Hall. Mr. 
Henry H. Clayton. 



has sent judging teams to the Brock- 
ton fair to cope with teams of the 
other state colleges In an annual stock 
judging contest. In both these con- 
tests the Aggie boys have shown their 

^ mettle and have come out ahead. 

completed. It was decided by the j^j^ y^^^ ^^g ^^^^ seems more corn- 
trustees to locate the agricultural petent than ever to win this contest 
group, containing at the outset a dairy I ^^^ ^^ jj^j^g ^onor to Its Alma Mater, 
building and the proposed new agrlcul- 1 s^^ ^\\ ^^^^ n^g team to win, and 
tural building, on the land just north of ^^.g ^p ^^ every one of us to help, 
the ravine and west of the present j Subscription papers will be passed 



A tuition fee will hereaf- 



dlnlng hall. A tuition tee wm nereat- j j^^Q^g you this week, 
ter be charged for students registering j y^y^ g^are. 
In the winter school, and beginning — — i^^a^^^i 

with the autumn of 1912 tuition will ' The members of the 



Be sure to do 



fumble, then Rhode Island recovered 
on a fumble and Sullivan punted to 
Smith. First half ended with the ball 
on our 40-yard line. 

In the second half Hubert replaced 
Edgerton, Rhode Island kicked off to 
Brewer who advanced the ball to our 
3 1 -yard line. No gains made and 
Brewer punted to Doll who advanced 
the ball to our 50-yard line. Sherwin 
made 5 yards through right tackle, 
then Sullivan advanced the ball to our 
15-yard line. First down was again 
obtained by two line plunges through 
right tackle and a left end run. A 
line plunge through right guard and an 



[Conttnuod on poc* 3] 



913 Index \ end run by Doll gave Rhode Island her 
be charged for students In the regular board are hard at work. Some of the! touchdown. No goal was kicked. 
courses who are not residents of the \ copy has already been sent to the | jhe third period ended with the ball on 
state. This, of course, will not apply printer. Some radical changes have jour 33-yard line. 

been planned, but a good book Is jhe fourth quarter started with Gore 
expected. and Samson playing In place of Smith 



to students already in college prior to 
the opening of the college year 1912-13, 



The College Signal, Toesdajr, September 26, 191 1. 



The College Signal, Tuet4ay, September 26. 1911. 



and Hubert. Brewer downed Doll for 
a loss and M. A. C. was given the ball, 
but lost it by a blocked forward pass 
from Brewer. Sullivan then punted 
to Gore who funnbled, but recovered. 
Rhode Island recovered on a fumble. 
Walker blocked Sullivan's punt but 
Sullivan recovered. Doll advanced 8 
yards through right tackle to our 40- 
yard line. Sullivan punted to Gore 
who recovered the ball for a touch- 
back. Brewer punted to Sullivan 
from our 25-yard line. Period and 
half ended with the ball In Rhode 
Islands possession on our 45-yard line. 
The score : — 



VI GENERAL DEPARTMENTS. 

/ Military Science. 
George C. Martin, Prof, and Captain. 
Samuel R. Parsons, Assistant. 
2 Physical Education. 

Curry S. Hicks, Assistant Prof, 
3 Library. 

Charles R. Green. 



RHODE ISLAND 


STATE 


M. A. 


Davis, le 




re, Larsen 


Burden. It 




ft. Walker 


Patlerson. Ig 




rg, Hayden 


Barry, c 




c, Johnson 



Ahrens. rg Ig, Edgerton, Hubert Sanr.pson 
Keith, rt It. Baker 

Webb, re le. Jones 

Sullivan, qb qb. Gore. Smith 

Doll (capt.). Ihb rhb. t>Jissen 

Newton, rhb Ihb. Brewer 

Sherwin, fb fb. Moreau 

Rhode Island State 5, M . A. C. 0. Touch- 
down — Sullivan. Goal missed — Sullivan. 
Referee — Hammond. Northampton. 
Umpire — Foley. Field judge — Roberts. 
Amherst. Linesman— Chapman, M. A. C. 
Timer— Sanderson. Time— two 9 and two 
8 minute periods. 

REDIVISION OF COURSES 

[Connnued from p>ce I] 



6 Veterinary Science. 

James B. Paige, Professor. 
George E. Gage, Assistant Prof. 

7 Zoology and Geology. 

Clarence E. Gordon, Assistant Prof. 
Leonard S. McLalne, Grad. Assistant, 

IV DIVISION OF HUMANITIES. 

Robert J. Sprague. Head of Division. 

/ Bconomics and Sociology. 
Robert J. Sprague, Professor. 

2 History ar^ Gooernnmit. 
Rimer K. Eyerly, In charge. 
George H. Holcomb. Lecturer. 

3 Language and Literature English. 
George F. Mills, Professor. 
Robert W. Neal. Associate Prof. 
Edward M. Lewis, Assistant Prof. 
Willard A. Wattles, Instructor. 
Helene Goessman, Assistant. 

Public Speaking. 
Howard G. F. Widger, Instructor. 

German. 
Rdgar L. Ashley, Assistant Prof. 
Arthur N. Julian, Instructor. 

French. 

A. A, Mackimmle, Assistant Prof. 
William L. Harmount. Instructor. 

V DIVISION OF RURAL SOCIAL SCIENCE. 

Kenyon L.Butterfield, Head of Division. 

/ Agricultnral Economics. 
Alexander E. Cance, Assistant Prof. 

2 Agricultural Education. 
William R. Hart, Professor. 
Floyd B. Jenks, Assistant Prof. 

3 Rural Sociology. 
Elmer K. Eyerly, Associate Prof. 



FRATERNITY HOUSE 
CONFERENCE 

By authority of the Trustees, Presi- 
dent Butterfield, in June, 191 I, called 
a conference for the purpose of discus- 
sing general matters connected with 
the erection of fraternity houses at M. 
A. C. and the regulations governing 
the control of the same. 

To this conference there were In- 
vited the members of the Trustees 
Committee on Buildings and Grounds, 
the members of the undergraduate fra- 
ternity conference, faculty representa- 
tives of each fraternity, several mem- 
bers of the faculty not belonging to , 
fraternities represented at M. A. C.,' 
and official representatives of each 
fraternity corporation. 

Thirty-six men gathered for this 
conference, which was held In the new 
entomological building on the evening 
of June 8th. 

The announcement was officially 
made at that time that the college 
would permit and encourage the erec- 
tion of fraternity rooming houses In 
accordance with certain regulations to 
be determined by the Trustees and 
agreed upon by the individual fra- 
ternities. 

A general discussion followed rela- 
tive to the control of fraternity houses 
by the Trustees with respect to loca- 
tion, to Inaximum and minimum cost, 
sanitation and general plan of the 
houses. Questions as to whether 
freshmen should be permitted to room 
In fraternity houses, and whether 
meals should be served therein, were 
also discussed. Suggestions were 
made and considered relative to vari- 
ous forms of faculty control over stu- 
dents rooming in fraternity houses. 

An arrangement was suggested by 
the Trustees whereby they would lease 
college land to fraternity corporations 
for the purpose of erecting buildings. 

The desirability of holding another 
conference of this nature was sug- 
gested. It was also urged that the 
fraternity corporations in consultation 
with undergraduate representatives of 
the frateruities should further discuss 
the general matter of fraternity houses, 
and the relation of the same to the 
college administration. 

The following resolutions were 
passed : 

That pending the action of the Trus- 
tees concerning the main question of 
fraternity houses, representatives of 
the respective fraternities should In a 
conference discuss the details of the 
matter as affecting their mutual rela- 
tions. 

That the president of the undergrad- 
uate fraternity conference be author- 



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COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
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FtMt Refiitirimf a Sfitcialty 
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1 Ized to call In the early autumn a joint 
conference of graduate and under- 

I graduate representatives of the various 

fraternities to consider the details 

underlying the general nnanagement of 

fraternities and fraternity houses. 

That further conferences similar to 

' this be held frequently in the future. 

CLASS ELECTIONS 

During the past week the following 
class officers were elected for the first 
semester: 

1912— President. Alden C. Brett of 
North Abington; vice president. The- 
odore J. Moreau of Turners Falls; 
secretary and treasurer, Eric N. 
Boland of South Boston ; class cap- j 
tain, Edward R.Lloyd of Boston; ser- 
geant-at-artns, John E. Plerpont of 
Williamsburg ; historian, Edwin B. 
Young of Dorchester. 

19l3_Presldent. Herman T. 
Roehrs of New York city ; vice-pres- 
ident, Charles D. Walker of Green- 
wich Village ; secretary and treasurer, 
David S. Caldwell of South Byfield; 
class captain, Stuart D. Sampson of 
Grand Isle. Vt. ; sergeanl-al-arms, 
George W. Barber of Franklin; his- 
torian. Robert S. Fay of Monson. 

I914_-President, Stanley B. Free- 
born of Ware; vice-president. David 
W. Gibson of Groton; secretary. 
Leiand H. Taylor of Peabody , treas- 
urer, John P. Palmer of Portsmouth. 
N. H. ; class captain, Sidney S. Bes- 
ser of Gllbertvllle ; sergeant at-arms. 
Harold C. Wooley of Maiden ; histor- 
ian, Chester E. Wheeler of Lowell. 

1915— Class captain, Paul J. Kaul- 
back of Greenfield. 



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AT- 



CHANGES IN TITLE OF OFFI 
CERS OF THE INSTITUTION. 

Edgar L. Ashley, Instructor In Ger- 
man, Assistant Professor of German. 
Joseph S. Chamberlain. Associate 
Professor of Chemistry, Associate 
Professor of Organic Agricultural 
Chemistry. 

Elmer K. Eyerly. Assistant Professor 
of Political Science and Lecturer in 
Rural Sociology. Associate Professor 
of Rural Sociology. ! 

Philip B. Hasbrouck, Registrar of the 
College. Associate Professor of Math-] 
ematlcs. and Adjunct Professor of i 
Physics, Professor of Physics and Reg- 
istrar of the College. 

Joseph B. Lindsey.Goessmann Pro- 
fessor of Agricultural Chemistry. 

Anderson A. Mackimmle. Instructor 
in French, Assistant Professor of 
French. 

George F. Mills, Dean of the College. 
Head of the Humanities, and Profes- 
sor of Languages and Literature, Dean 
of the College. Professor of Languages 
and Llteratuje. 

Charles Wellington, Professor of 
General and Agricultural Chemistry, 
Professor of Chemistry. 



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The freshmen at Amherst College 
easily won the annual flag rush last 
Saturday evening This is the second 

Thp rnllCRG DrUR StOrO time m succession that the sophomores 
I lie UUIICD O I ^^^^ ^^^^ defeated. 




PROMPT SERVICE 




The College Signal, Tuesdax, September 26, 191 1. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 

the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOABD OF KDIT0B8. 

ALDEN C. BRETT, 1912 EdItor-ln-ChW. 

MARSHALL C. PRATT, 1912, Assistant Editor. 
JESSE CARPENTER. JR.. 1 91 2 Maiu^lne Editor. 
ROYAL N. HALLOWELL. 1912. Athletics. 

JOSEPH A. HARLOW. 1912. Athletics. 

SILAS WILLIAMS, 1912. Depirtmeiit Notes. 

OSCAR G. ANDERSON. 1913. Alumni Noiat. 
R. H. VANZWALENBURG. 1913, Col leue Notes. 
S. MILLER JORDAN 1913. Collage Notes. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912. Business Muuger. 

GEORGE ZABRISKIE, 1913 AsM. Bus. Manafer. 
ERNEST S. CLARK. JR., 1914, Circulation. 

CHESTER E. WHEELER 1914. Circulation. 

STUART B. FOSTER. 1914. Cifcutolioa. 



Subscription $150 per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Albert W. Dodge. 



Entered a* Moond-claM matter at the AmhefM 
Peat Offiee. 

Vol. XXII. TUESDAY, SEPT. 26. No. 2 



Don't forget that Oct. 1st the com- 
petition for positions on the Signal 
board begins. If you have any literary 
or business ability plan to enter. An 
announcement of the rules governing 
the competition will be made later. 



M. C. A. in the chapel Thursday 
evening at 6-45. All come. 

The Spitzbuber Club held an out-of- 
town social meeting last Saturday 
evening, only the members being 
present. 

The Assembly last Wednesday was 
addressed by Dean George F. Mills. 
After the address there was a short 
mass meeting. 

The Dramatic Society has chosen 
for presentation this winter George 
Broadhurst's comedy, ''What Hap- 
pened to Jones." 

The wily sophs have devised a 
scheme for enriching their class treas- 
ury. The freshmen are the "goats" 
on the poster deal. 

President Butterfield tendered a 
reception to the new members of the 
faculty on Friday night and another 
Saturday to the class of 1915. 

Postmaster Griggs reports that all 
of the mail boxes have not yet been 
taken. Sunday delivery has begun 
and as soon as the remainder of the 
boxes are rented there will be four 
delivetles a day instead of the present 
three. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 




E WELL'S 



It's a good thing not to worry about 
your pedal apparel, its correct, style 
comfort or durability. 

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It was evident to every spectator 
that the spirit shown by the student 
body on the side lines Saturday was 
not what It should have been. The 
chee.s and songs might have been con- 
sidered very creditable if given by a 
prep, school of a couple hundred but 
they were not what should be expected 
of five hundred college men. Get a 
little more of the old M. A. C. spirit ; 
the kind that has been shown at Spring- 
field every year. Cheer yourself 
hoarse, your vocal cords will get over 
it. Believe in the team, support it, 
think it will win, and it can not help 
but win. 



How about our musical clubs ? 
Are they this year going to be institu- 
tions of which the college may justly 
feel proud, or shall we continue In the 
same old way to support a second class 
organization ? Surely in a body of 
five hundred men sufficient first class 
material can be found. The problem 
then is to secure and develop this 
material. In the first place all men 
who have any musical ability whatso- 
ever should tryout, and secondly, every 
man who comes cut must be willing to 
put his best efforts into the work. 
The complaint of the coach of last 
year was continually, not enough 
practice. We have this year leaders 
of ability and it now rests with you 
men whether or not the season shall be 
a success. 



TEACHERS OF AGRICULTURE 

Professor Hart has a letter from the 
Commissioner of Education of the Phil- 
ippine Islands asking about the 
preparation of teachers at this college. 
The commissioner is now in this coun- 
try looking for men qualified as teach- 
ers of agriculture in the islands. 
Graduates of agricultural colleges will 
be given the preference. Some Im- 
portant positions are now open. 
Wages range from $1000 up to $3000 
a year depending on the length of 
time one has taught and the grade of 
the service one is in. Teachers are 
limited to $2000. Directors and 
supervlsiors get more. The commis- 
sioner's letter indicates that he will be 
In Amherst in the near future. Those 
wishing a conference with him may 
consult Professor Hart. 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUa5 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn- 
gland of .Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 



Holies " Special, " Stetson Shoes, 

f5>oo to $8.00 

K EPA I KING DKI'ARTMENT 

E. M. BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Next to Corner Drug Store. 



Angier, '13. 



Clark, 'ij. 



We have a full line of Hanncrs, Fost 
Cards, College Songs, .Seal Papers, Foun- 
tain Tens, Candy, Tonic and Student 
Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

BASEMENT OF NO. COLLEUK 



Eldridge, '14. 



Tarbell, '14. 



S. S. HYDE 



AND 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Philli|M Block 
Amherst, Mass, 



COLLEGE NOTES 

"A bad beginning makes a good 
ending." Watch the team "come 
back." 

There will be a meeting of the Y. 



MEN FILLING POSITIONS ON 

FACULTY MADE VACANT 

BY RESIGNATIONS 

Curry S. Hicks, Assistant Professor 
of Physical Education and Hygiene.for 
Percy L. Reynolds. 

Charles A. Peters, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Inorganic and Soil Chemistry, 
for S. Francis Howard. 

Frederick L. Yeaw, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Market Gardening, for Charles 
S. Heller. 

Arthur K. Harrison, Instructor In 
Landscape Gardening, for John Noyes, 

Howard G. F. Widger. Instructor 
in English, for Frederick B. McKay. 

'08.— H. K. Hayes received the 
degree of M. S. from Harvard last 
June. "Inheritance In Maize." Bul- 
letin 168, Connecticut Experiment 
Station by E. M. East and H. K. 
Hayes. "Improvement In Corn, Bui- 
letin 168, by H. K. Hayes and E. M. 
East. 



C&rp^n-tcr S Morehousf, 

PRiriTERSi 



No I, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Maat. 



H. E. KINSMAN, 

College PhotograpDer 

NASH BLOCK, MAIN ST., 
AMHERST, MASS. 



High-grade artistic work. Perfect satisfaction guaranteed. 
Studio newly equipped with large sky light 
and special lense for large 
groups. 

All styles the latest. Fine picture fuming. 



L 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 26, 191 1. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

ENTOMOLOGY. 

The department has recently added 
considerably to its equipment in way 
of trays for the insects. 

Several new pieces of spraying 
apparatus have been donated by the 
different manufacturers for examina- 
tion by the students. 

So far .seven graduate students have 
registered thus year. 

Dr. Fernald made a large collection 
of insects at Nantucket this summer 
and found several not heretofore known 
to occur in Massachusetts. 

ZOOLOCY-CEOLOCY. 

During the month of July the 
department tstablished a camp at the 
seashore and collected a large supply 
of laboratory material for the sopho- 
more and junior zoology courses. 
Along with the collecting and the chart- 
ing of localities a study of the habits 
and habitat of the different forms was 
made by the student members of the 
party. 

Arrangements have been made 
whereby the deparment may obtain 
supplies of intestinal and other para- 
sites of domestic animals for the ani- 
mal parasite courses. These courses 
are open to properly qualified seniors 
or may be pursued as a part of the 
postgraduate work In advanced zoology. 
If preceded by the proper prerequisite 
studies. 

•During the latter part of jhe summer 
Professor Gordon accompanied a col- 
lecting party from Columbia University 
through different parts of New York 
state for the purpose of extending the 
collections and illustrative material for 
the geology courses. 

LANDSCAPE GARDENING 

Students in Landscape Gardening 3 
recently spent an afternoon laying off 
and constructing a rustic walk up the 
hill to President Butterfield's house. 

The department has been busy dur- 
ing the summer designing and direct- 
ing various Improvements on the 
grounds, the most conspicuous being 
the waiting station and the new walks 

The drafting rooms in Landscape 
gardening and Drawing are all over- 
crowded. It has been impossible to 
accommodate all those who applied, 
and the probability is that additional 
room will have to be secured within a 
year or so. 

The graduates in Landscape Gar- 
dening have been in strong demand 
this year, and many of the men have 
found new places. H. R. Francis '10 
has become superintendent of grounds 
at Culver Military Academy, Culver, 
Ind. Clifton L. Flint '08, has decided 
to stay with the Oregon Agricultural 
College. D. P. Miller '08, has left 
New York city and the nursery trade 
to go into business for himself at Wor- 
cester. E. M. Brown '11, is In the 
Hartford Park System. A. H. Sharpe 
Ml, Is doing landscape garden work 



with a Canadian firm. H. W. Blaney 
'II, is with Warren H. Manning, Bos- 
ton, R. C. Robinson '1 1, is with W. 
B. Hatch '05, at Nyatt, R. I., 
engaged on landscape construction 
work. Louis Brandt '10, decided to 
stay with the University of Illinois in 
preference to Smith College. H. D. 
Phelps '09. is with Brett & Hall, 
landscape architects of Boston. 

POMOLOGY 

The teams for the intercollegiate 
contest in judging and paclcing apples 
are already in training. After some 
preliminary work at the college they 
will visit some of the agricultural fairs 
for a final finish. The contest is to be 
held this year at Boston in connection 
with the New England Fruit show. 
Oct. 23d-28th. 

Professor Sears judged fruit at 
Clinton Fair on Sept. 12th and 13th 
and at Greenfield on the 20ih. At 
Clinton the exhibit was one of the 
largest and finest ever shown in New 
England consisting of 13 grange 
exhibits of 55 boxes each. 

The new storage and laboratory 
building is almost completed in fact 
one of the refrigerated rooms and two 
storage rooms are already in use for 
the early fruits. It is being built by 
the Madison Cooper Co. of Water- 
town. N. Y. and the man who put in 
the refrigerator apparatus, who has 
been in the employ of the company for 
14 years, pronounced it the b-*st build- 
ing he had ever worked on. 

ALUMNI NOTES 

'85. -Edwin W. Allen, Ph. D., Wash- 
ington, D. C. Editor of Experiment 
Station Record is Secretary and Treas 
urer of Society for Promotion of Agri- 
cultural Science, and Vice-President 
of the Association of American Agri- 
cultural Colleges and Experiment 
Stations. Dr. Alien has also been 
designated as collaborator on the 
American yearbook. 

C. F. W. Felt is Chief Engineer of 
the Atchison. Topeka and Santa Fe 
Railroad. 

'88.— Fred Smith Cooiey, is Head 
of the Extension Department in the 
Montana Agricultural College. A 
better farming special on the North 
Pacific Railway reached 30.000 
people. 

'89. — B. L. Hartwell, Professor 
Agricultural Chemistry, Rhode Island 
State College has heen elected Fellow 
of A. A. A. S. and member of So- 
ciety for Promotion of Agricultural 
Science. 

'90. Edgar Gregory has been elec- 
ted 2nd Vice-President of the Ameri- 
can Seed Association. 

'91. — Malcolm A. Carpenter, Green- 
field, Mass., is superintendent of de- 
velopment of a Residential Park, 
Montclalr, N. J. 

'92. — George E. Taylor, Jr., won 
the sweepstakes with ten ears of corn 
at the N. E. Corn Exposition. 

'93.— Fred A. Smith is Secretary of 
the Essex Agricultural Society. 



Balanced and Specialized Fertilizers 



Well-balanced, specialized fertilizers, containiii);; the ri(;ht amounts 
of available nitrogen, in both chemical and organic foims, with an excess 
of soluble and reverted phosphoric acid, both for fertilizing and citalyz 
ing effect.s, and the proper amount and right forn» of potash, all thorough 
Iv blended together and in forms that will not cai<c, liut remain in a 
arillable conciition, and which will act not only in the beginning, but 
throughout the season (fertilizers based upon the needs of the crop and 
market requirements), are what the practical farmer should rely upon in 
growing commercial crops. Above all things, he slionid avoid un- 
oalanced and improper mixtures that have the defect of one i-ifincnt 
being tMsoluhle and another element (00 soliilile for successful plant 
growth. Think of this when considering home mixing. 

It is much the same witli modern fertilizers as it is will) modern 
medicine. As a rule the best physicians do not send their patients to a 
drng store with prescriptions to be made up. They are prescribing mix- 
tures already made up to certain known standards and formulas by 
large manufacturing drug hou.ses of whom tliere are perhaps a do^eii in 
the United .States. In this way they get the drugs they want, the for- 
mulas they want and the conditions in which they want them. These 
formulas represent the crystallized experience of ihou.sands of 
physicians in dealing with many conditions. In critical ( ases physii ians 
do not put their trusts in prescriptions made up in small lots of tint cttain 
chemicals tjy local druggists. Can the farmer afford to mix doses foi liis 
crops even if he knows nis ingredients.' 



BOWKER 



Fertilizer Company 

43 Chatham St. Boston 



f=. A. SHERARD. 

MEN'S STORE 



Kuppentieimefs 
Fine Clothes 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOM TAILORING li SPECIAITT 

THO.MAS Hkmknwav, '12, M. A. (■ Rt presentiitive 




FRANK S. O'bRIEN 
LIVERY. FEED AND hACK 



Hacks for Funerals, Weddings, Parties 



8 Pearl St., Near Union Sta. 

NORTHAMPTON, • MASS. 

T«lohone 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



HENRY ADAMS k Go. 



THE OLD GOIIIIER DRUli STORL 



H. W. FIELD 

... FbORIST ... 



ROMS, Violets, Carnations 



OPP. ACAt>EMY OP MIJ.SK-, 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 26, 191 1. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September j6, 1911. 




■ • -»; A A ,«. ,^ •, ,>■, A ••:. ,!«, X ;<, .». .K, Sf. *. X X X XX. X. X XX XXX X X '. 

GOODS FOR MEN. 

C. & K. Derbys, 
Keiser Cravats, 

English and Scotch Woolens. 



TH£ BIG COLLEGE STORES. 



CAMPION, 



AMHERST. 



DARTMOUTH. 



^•,'A;****.^-v'2*«*^v.%^M^^*^»*«*«»^«%*r*»**^iVx%^^^ 



Highest Grade Roses 

We are offering to our local patron;*, selection from our large 
stock of finest Roses, es|>ecially grown for the Ntw York and BosruN 
fi.owKR M.AkKfcrs. 

THE MONTGOMERY CO., Inc., 



MADL-fc-Y, fVIASSS. 



TELEPHONES. 

Amherin. I9t>-R. 
Northampton, 660. 



M n.QiLMAN. r A Morrrr. 

II:LEPMONn 1079-3. 

GILMAN and M OFFET. 

Matiuf4Clureis of .tiid Wliolcsale Dealers 

CONFECTIONERY. 

/•'Till til Main strkkt. 

WORCI-^STIiR, MahS. 



WHY NOT SUBSCRIBE 



T«l THK 



FOR FARMS ! 

Big. Utile or Middle Sized, 

Also 

Village Houits or Building I,ots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W. R BROWN 

Savings Bank Bl'k, 

Amherst. Mass. 

SfKAM KITTINO, Telephone s^-4 

GA5 FITI ISr;, TINNINr,. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PLUMBERS. 

Specialty of HepairinK 

CuirRCH Windows, 
Memorial Winoows, 
Lkai) I.ir.HTS, &c. 
6 Clifton Ave.. AMUI-.KST. MASS 



SATURDAY 
EVENIHG POST 

(Jollegc Representative, 

I-. S. Krkkkman, '14 



jtH. N. PARISKAU,j» 

HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 

RAZORS HONKIJ 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst. Mass. 



M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 

Orderi left at the Amhrrtt Houie will receive 
prompt attention 

E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

Williams Bro( k, Amherst, Mass. 

< •ri'l' F. lIoifRS: 



Dr. H. F. Staples Is President of 
the Homcepathic Medical Society of 
Ohio. 

I '95. — George A. Biilings, Silver 

Spring, Md., has been investigating 

; Farm Management Problems in Penn., 

and New York during the past Year. 

Robert A. Cooley has recently par- 
ticipated in the investigation of the 
ticks and Rocky Mt. Spotted Fever in 
Bitter Rock Valley. He is author of 
Bulletin 82 of the Montana Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station, this being 
the eighth annual report from the of- 
fice of the state entomologist. 

Candidate for M. A. C. in 1932— 
Walter Harrison Morse, son of Walter 
L. Morse, lertninal engineer New 
York Central & Hudson River R. R. 
company. 

F. C. Toby, General Manager West 
Stockbridg^ Lime Co., known as the 
••Toby Lime Co.. Fred Ttrrer '99 is 
one of the directors. 

'96.— F. C. Clapp is Deputy Di- 
vision Engineer on work of Board of 
I Wattr Supply of City of New York. 
I '97.— George H. Drew is Vice Presl- 
jdent Conn., Poniological Society. 
Mr. Drew has recently studied Fruit 
Growing on the Pacific Goast. 

T. A. Enrich Is 1st Vice-President 
of ihe Oregan S. S. Asiocla'lon. Presi- 
dent Oregon S. S. Committee for In- 
ternational Missionary Convention of 
Christian Churches. 

■98.--The firm of Wiley & Hoffman. 
15 S. Gay Street, Baltirrore, Md. . 
was dissolved by mutual consent on 
August 30. 191 I. Samuel W. Wiley 
has assumed all the obligations of the 
old firm and will continue a chemical 
laboratory at the old address under name 
of Wiley & Co.. where he will be glad 
to see his friends and clients as in the 
past. 

'98.— Julian Stiles Eaton has re- 
signed his position as Chief Adjuster 
of Travelers' Insurance Company. 
Hartford, and also that of President 
of Inter ational Claim Association to 
take up general practice of lav in 
New York City. 

'00.- F. H. Brown. Secretary 
Massachusetts Fruit Growers' Asso- 
ciation, Master Borough Pomona 
Grange, Executive Committee Mas- 
sachusetts Corn Show. 

F. G. Stanley, M. D., Civil Service. 
American Express Examiner, Surgeon 
to Athletic Association. Beverly High 
School Emergency Surgeon, Casualty 
Insurance Company, and President of 
Beverly Hospital Staff. 

'07. John N. Sum.Tiers, Entomol- 
ogist, is located at the Gypsy Moth 
Parasite Laboratory, Meirose High- 
lands. He received the degree of 
doctor of philosophy from the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College last 
June. 

'07. F. A. Watkins, West Mill- 
bury, recently underwent an operation 
for the amputation of his left forearm 
three inches below the elbow. 



1908 CLASS NOTICE. 
Please address future communica- 
tions with the secretary to U. S. 
Dep't Agriculture, Bureau of Ento- 
mology, Washington, D. C. 

'08.— On Saturday. Sept. 23rd, 
John Robert Parker was married to 
Miss May Elizabeth Phillips. The 
ceremony took place at the home of 
the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Stanley A. Phillips, Pleasant St., 
Amherst. The event was followed by 
by a wedding reception. 

'08. W. S. Regan, Deputy State 
Inspector of Nurseries, was seen about 
the campus recently. His presence 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



A Specialty of College Classes. 



I02 Main St. 



.Northampton, MabS. 



WrlgiitiDltson 



Heatfqiarlirt 
for 



Athletic Suppli^.s 



Bate B^ll 

i.awii I riiiii 
(inll 

H4Nk<'t lull 
Fnol H.1II 
H-Hkpv 
Trarlc i«n«1 
Field ^|H«rt- 



Ideals ^ 
K for ^t>v 



Ceitigo SlDdoflls 
and Athletes 
want the real 

perior articles ... ^^^^ 
the larious sports^^ (^; 
thoBid Insist upon^o** •** 
those bearing tht 
Wright & Oltsoi 
Trail Marl 

CatalogHe Free 

Wright & Ditson 

334 Washington St. 
Boston 

Nil Yorli Chicago 

San Francisco 
Proiliiici CMlrMgii 



AMHERST 

Chp Laundry 

I-aiindry Work and Cleaning 

& Pressing Rightly 

Done 



Agent for Laundry, H. W. iJlaney, 'ii, 
C. .S. C. flouse. 

Agent for Pressing, 1.. L Winn, 87 
riea.sant .St. 

Team collects Monday.s and Thursdays, 
DcliverR Thursdays and Saturdays. 




Cmn. Valley SI. Ry. Lloes 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green* 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations,violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

87 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Chsed only from t A. M. to 4 A. M. 



In Amherst was due to the class 
wedding. 

'08. — H. M. Jennison has severed 
his connections with Perdue Univer- 
sity and Is now connected with the 
Montana Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion at Boseman, Montana. 

'08.— T. L. Warner, C. E.. Coast 
and Geodetic Survey, Washington, D. 
C, was recently leader of a party for 
the determination of the intensity of 
gravitation. 

'08. — E. W. Bailey is now associ- 
ate professor of Pomology. University 
of Illinois, and first assistant in plant 
breeding at the Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station. 

'08.— J. A, Hyslop received the 
Master of Science degree from Wash- 
ington State College. 

'08. — H. M. Jennison received the 
degree of Master of Arts at Wabash 
College, June 14. 1911. 

'09.- Harold J. Neale. 2 Sturgis 
St., Worcester. married Dorothy 
Whitman, June 26, 1911. 

'09.— John Noyes is W. R. Man- 
ning, landscape designer, Boston. 

'09.— H. L. White, of Maynard. 
was married to Miss Rena E. Smith 
of Maynard, March 22d, 191 I. 

'09.— R. C. Lindblad, married at 
Brimfleld on Sept. 9, 1911. to Miss 
Rosa Brown. 

'09.— P. P. Cardin has recently 
been made a member of the Ameri- 
can Phytopathological Society. Mr. 
Cardin is chief of the department of 
Vegetable Pathology and Entomology. 
Estaclon Agronomlca, Santiago de las 
Vegas, Cuba. 

'09.— Harold P. Crosby was mar- 
ried to Miss Lucy Eastman of North 
Amherst last July. 

'09.— Harold D. Phelps recently 
purchased a small estate in West 
BrooKfield, where he will make his 
home with his mother, retaining his 
connection with Brett & Hal!. Land- 
scape Architects, 31 Beacon St., 
Boston. 

'10. — In a letter received during 
the vacation W. C Johnson says that 
he Is "hitting the high places" in 
central New York state as a success 
ful fertilizer salesman, gaining m.uch 
valuable experience and enjoying life 
In the open at the same time. 

•|0.— H. A. b.-ooks, 102 B Street, 
N.E., Washington, L^.C, draughtsman. 
Washington Terminal Co. 

•10.— J.P.BIaney.with Guy Lowell. 
landscape architect, Boston. 

'10. — "Pete" Allen was also a 
guest at "Bob" Parker's wedding. 

'10.— Charles Oertel writes "trans- 
ferred from San Xavier to Indian 
Oasis. 65 miles further west. I am 
under the same agency but the work 
here is much broader. 

'10. — H. W. French has purchased 
a farm. 

'10.— S. C. Brooks has been seri- 
ously 111 with typhoid fever but Is 
slowly recovering. « 



TIC AHHms r mii^ 



SEPTEMBER 26 and 27 



Aeroplane Flights by STONE In a 



Monoplane 



At Hampshire Park, Sfptt-nilKM- 26 aiui 27, Aiitliur H. Stone, 

the famous aviator, sensation <>l the Chicago Aero 

Meet and big prize winner at the Ii(»^ton 

Meet, will fiv both days. 



GREAT RACING BOTH DAYS 

Splendid exhibits in all dej)artments. jmenilf e.xhibits and 

athletic sports, (irandstand seats for Wednesday 

reserved. Tickets on sale at IViiel'.s 

and C<»llege Drug Store, 50c. 

For prtmium list, address Da.- id II. Ketdy. Amherst, Afass. 



OrchardB Pay Better Than (iold Mines When l-ertlllJEed With 

GENUINE THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER! 



I h<> Ma««arh«i^Ptt« Stale lto.ird oi .Xicricullurc OfT«red a Priz<> tor the Movt Prnhtablr Acr« of 
VI \s-\ tcliuu>ltH < IrclLirdt. Tills Contest Mas Recently Closed, and the 

PRi2e IS WON BV THE OKEW-MUNSON FKUIT CO.. •! LItttoton, Mm*. 

Their Prlw Winninf Acre of liatdwin Appl«« 

UAVB THRM A TOTAL HRTUHN OF i718.70-THH NRT PROFIT WA* >8I«.SS 



FKRriUZKIl \VI Til 



KEillNE THOmilS PHOSPHITE POWDEI,' 



000 I. HS PICK ACRE 



The Pilliwing \M\ft Prom H irnc^ Hrtither>i, tli** Famous Fruit Cirower* and OrrhardiM^ of 

Valesville, (nun.. Show* that Thonmi I'hosphate Powder Krings .1 Pti^e to 

ICvery User in the Fi»rn» of a Profitable Crop ; 



!IF •'•H MtlHTIMFR COMHANV. 

•]-«jfntlenicn . 

In r>-K;ird to I'liomas Phosphate Prnvtifr, 

vou will ret.ill that wi* IiourIiI uI vou last year 
I Vj/<"«« ind w<* wish to s^y th.»t it save ii» most 
fti.fUent rftiillf. On mir j>eich orchard where 
we iiswl It, the frfe>. made a fftfmtid groiHh 
■with heavy dark grtfn f,diagt. the ftntl was of 
txifllrnl ,olor, :inil tli.- kfel>tng\^iialitiifutrtri 



markabtt, which wai a Ing advanlage, especial- 
ly when we had over \\o cars to harvett in ahtmi 
hvo u>eeki as we had this year. 

Wt never lav belter 1 olored Raldivin APpUt 
than thofe we rrru> where we aP/lied a gmh/ 
dretiinr 0/ Thomai Phoiphate J rnvder. Th* 
hett t^ld at retail Jar |m oo/cr barrel. 

Vours truly, 

liANNRS BRoTHEIIS. 



THFRR IS A TRUTH IN ALL THIS FOR VOU I 

The wholo story is told 111 the .New Kdition of our Honklet, 'tJp-To Pate 
FraitCirowing," which is sent free if you mention 1 hk Coli.egh SiriNAL. 

The Coe-Mortimer Co.iM^mKTEKs 5 « Chamber St., N. Y. City 

We also distrihute from Boston, Mass.; BBtrART, Mainr; liAiTiMOKB, 
Md.; Phii.a.. Pa ; Nonroi.K, Va.; Savannah, CiA.; Chari.ston, S C. 



i 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 26, 1911. 



m. J. Laporie, Idc. 



H 



I'roprietors of 



prO-LllfEBY-|IOR8E 



Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 



Tel. 183. 



ASK YOUR 

STATIONER yfei 1 

FOR xi:>^ 

Ward's Fountain I'ens. Fine Papers 
and linvelopes, StucJents' Supplies. 
Send for.sampk-.sof Kngraved Invita- 
tions, class and Fraternity Paper, 
Itanquet Menus, Visiting Cards, &c. 

SAMUEL WARD CO., 

Ward's "\'o^^oT""' 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Forty-fifth year has opened with the registration 
of four year men aggregating 4?! : to date of Sep- 
tember 23. The distribution by classes is as follows : 



Seniors, - 
Juniors, 
Sophomores, 
Freshmen, - 



84 
98 

164 



Corres|X)nding registration for other years has 
been : 



1906 
1901 - 
1896 



219 

- '34 
81 



Send for a catalog. 



Allen Bros. 

Contractors & Builders. 
Painting, 

Electrical Work. 



Amherst, Hass. 



KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, PRESIDENT 

AMHERST. MASS. 



DUDLEY 

oUTrrrxKR in 

Fine Athletic Goods 

FOR EVERY SPORT 

We clotiie the best Base Ball Teams 
in America. We make the "Dudley" 
Sujierior Shaker Sweaters which are 
to day the Standard Sweaters of the 
world. We specialize in Complete 
College and Profession alTeam Fxjuip- 
ment. Uniforms, Base Balls, Bats, 
Shoes, etc, etc. Special Quotations 
to Clubs and Team Managers. 

Write for cataloge. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

N.neteen Hundred and Twelve Index, 

Nineteen Hundred and Tnlrteen Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club. 

M. A. C. Dramatic Society, 

Debating Society. 

Public Speaking Council, 



H. C. Walker, President 
Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

C. C. Pearson, Manager 

R. T. Borden. Manager 

R. T. Beers. Manager 

H H. Wood, Manager 

S. M. Jordan, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

O. G. Anderson. Manager 

F. S. Madison, President 

L. S. Caldwell. President 
J. D. French, Manager 

W. J. Weaver. President 
E. R. Lloyd, President 

W. J. Birdsall. President 
J. M. Heald. President 
T. J. Moreau, President 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 



diaries H. Dudley 



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N. H. 



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FRUIT. 

CONFECTIONERY. 
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RRICKS TO TAKE MOMK. 

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JOHN WOJT A ZC ZYK 

Boot & Shoes Repaired 

Fli«»T CLASS WORK 

Amherst, . - - Mass. 



U/hen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets. Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BKST of c:i.FAN8iNO, Pressing, 
Dyking, and Kefairinu. 

ricKcr •rmrmM 

No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish's 
Store. 



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1>lephone (onn«ctioB 

TAILOR AND PRESSER 

Fall and Winter Suits 

Chevrons and Stripes 

Tut on Military Suits 

Full hress Suits to Rent 

Gents' Furnishings 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manuf.icturers of 



CARS 

Leave AOCIIE COLLEQE for HOL- 
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CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AOGIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and J7 mim. past each 
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SpMtal Can at R*M«Mbl« ttmt— 

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BOYDEN'S 

Restaurant and Bakery 

Catering 
a Specialty 

1 96-200 Main St., Nortbanptoi, Mm. 



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For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

JACOB Reed's Sons, 

Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



THE NEW ENGLAND NEWSPAPER 

All the news and the Truth 
about it, in the :: 

Springfleld Republican 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 
News fully reported. 

BEST SPORTING PAOS^ 

The Weekly Republican will be sent 

free for one month to anyone 

wishing to try it. 

Dai/y, $». Sunday, %a. Wetkly, $1. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Vol. XXII. 



MASSACHU SETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 3, 191 1 



Y. M. C. A. 



First Meeting of the Year Addressed by 

Prof. MacKimmie Who Spoke on 

"Why the College Y. M. C. A.?" 



SIGNAL COMPETITION 



Announcement for the Year. Competi- 
tion Starts at Once and Contin- 
ues Until March i. 



DARTMOUTH GAME 



4) 

V -3 



No. 3 



ANNIVERS-o NIGHT 



The firsr regular meeting of the 
College Y. M. C. A. was held last 
Thursday evening at the usual time 
and place. Professor Mackimmie 
gave an interesting and Instructive talk 
on "Why the College Y. M. C. A." 
When confronted with this topic upon 
which to address the students he said 
that he felt like asking "Why any- 
thing?" He put the question to those 
present: How would you like to be 
able to say after your graduation here 
that you were a graduate of the best 
college in the world? It is a fact, he 
said, that in no college do all the 
students work up to their full capacity. 
If the students in M. A. C. would 
work up to their full capacity for the 
coming year, the reputation of M. A. 
C. as the best college in the world 
could be firmly established. Refer- 
ring to the Y. M. C. A. triangle which 
stands for development In spirit, mind, 
and body, he said that In coliege.s 
the association could neglect its bus- 
iness of developing the minds of its 
members: the faculty would do that. 
Its greatest concern should be to 
develop its members bodily. Body 
development is not primarily the devel- 
opment of the muscles, although this 
Is necessary, but the development of 
body purity. Dwelling upon this sub- 
ject, he said that he knew of no way 
that this condition could be reached in 
the Individual except through fellow- 
ship with the Almighty, thus bringing 
out the necessity for the development 
of the spiritual nature also. 



INTERCLASS CROSS COUNTRY 
RUN 



This year the Interclass cross coun- 
try run will come much earlier than In 
former years. October 12th is the 
day on which it is planned to have it 
come off. One reason for having it 
earlier is to bring out the best material 
possible In preparation for the run 
against Tufts, on Oct. 28th, on the 
course from Sunderland to Amherst. 
Points will be given as informer years, 
twenty to the winner, nineteen to the 
second man, and so on, the class hav- 
ing the largest number of points win- 
ning. The victorious class receives 
twelve points which count, together 
with points won in the Interclass meets 
towards the cup which Is competed for 
each year by the classes. There are 
a large number of candidates out, and 
attempts will be made to lower the 
record established last year. 



In order to elect new mambers to 
the Signal Board, a competition is 
held to choose the best men for the 
position. This competition Is In 
charge of the Board of Editors who 
appoint one of their number to attend 
to the details. Election to the board 
Is made through a system of credits 
which are given according to the 
quantity and quality of work done. 

This year the rules of the competi- 
tion have been somewhat changed. 
A distinction has been made between 
those desiring positions In the editorial 
department and those desiring positions 
In the business department. In the 
editortial department there will be six 
new appointments made, two from 
each of the three lower classes. One 
credit will be allowed for: — 

Each ten inches of original copy. 
This may include athletic contests or 
college notes. 

Each fifteen Inches of reprint or 
material such as speeches, alumni and 
department notes, and articles secured 
by interview. 

The competition in the d-partnent 
will be In charge of the competition 
editor, except the giving of assign- 
ments which will be In charge of the 
edltor-ln chief. Material to count for 
credit, must be suitable for pdblicatlon 
In the Signal. The editor-ln-chlef 
and the competition editor, acting 
together shall be judges of whether or 
not material Is suitable for publication. 
Materl?! shall not be suitable for publi- 
cation, when the article Is poorly writ- 
ten, unnecessarily long, or not of gen- 
eral Interest. All material must be 
passed into the Signal office, or to the 
competition editor, subject to the fol- 
lowing time limit. Reports of events 
happening before Friday noon must be 
passed In before 8-00 a. m. Saturday. 
Reports of events later than Friday 
noon must be passed in before 7-30 a. 
M. Monday, earlier If possible. Aii 
alumni and department notes and | 
reports of lntervie*/s must be In before 
8-00 A M. Saturday. Failure to 
observe these time limits will result In 
the forfeiture ol any credit that would 
otherwise be given lor that article. 
Competition starts at once, and will 
continue until March 1st, 1912. 

In the business department two 

appointments to the board will be 

made one from the Sophomore and 

I one from the Freshman class. One 

credit will be given as follows : 

New advertisements to the value of 



(Continued on p«c« 2] 



Team Loses to the Green Team by aa-c 

Score. Large Score Partly 

Due to Fumbling. 

Massachusetts met her secona 
defeat of the season at the hands of 
Dartmouth. Saturday, at Hanover by 
a 22-0 score. The first half was 
featured by long gains through the 
Aggie line and repeated fumbling by 
both teams. The second half found 
Massachusetts showing a better de- 
fense and more aggressiveness in her 
offensive work. Dartmouth stuck to 
straight football throughout the game, 
while Aggie, after finding no gain pos- 
sible through their opponent's line, 
featured the second half by numerous 
open plays. 

The ball was put In play by Elcock 
of Dartmouth kicking to Nissen, 
After an exchange of punts and a 
fumble by Dartmouth Morey carried 
the ball over by line bucking for the 
first score. Barends kicked a pretty 
goal. The first quarter ended after 
Aggie had twice held the green line 
for downs. Hogseit opened the sec- 
ond quarter by scoring after several 
line bucks and a long end run, but 
failed to kick the goal. Moreau took 
Merrfirs place and Larsen was 
injured, Jones replacing him. An 
exchange of punts followed and scrim- 
maging from the 25 yard line was 
frequent. 

Dartmouth recovered the ball on an 
onside kick, and line plunges by Hog- 
sett and Dudley placed the latter 
across the line for the third score, 
Hogsett again missing the goal. 

Walker put the ball In play again by 
kicking to Dartmouth who returned It 
to the center of the field. Here the 
Green punted to Smith, who fumbled. 
Estep recovered the ball and slipped 
through the Aggie line for the last 
score, Hogsett succeeding in kicking 
the goal. 

Massachusetts attempted open plays 
on the next kickoff and Jones made a 
pretty gain of 10 yards. The half 
ended with an exchange of punts. 

The second half started with a few 

\ changes in the Dartmouth line. Aggie 

started by holding the Green line for 

downs. Several successful forward 

passes placed the ball in position for a 

try for a field goal by Smith, who 

i failed by a wide margin. Dartmouth 

' punted out of danger from the 25 yard 

line after failing to gain. Gains by 

Aggie through successful passes 

• brought the ball down into Dartmouth 

territory again and again, but at no 

time was the Green in danger. 

Huntington was Injured after being 

tContinuod oa pa(a 2) 



First of the Series 
Celebrated at D 



}llege Nights 
Hall Last 



Friday j ;?. g. 

The first College „... of the year 
was Well attended. Draper Hall being 
crowded with students, faculty and 
trustees, and was In every way a suc- 
cessful affair. After a long yell for the 
football team, then In Hanover. Pres- 
ident Butterfleid briefly explained the 
meaning and purpose of college nights 
and designated this one as a celebra- 
tion of the opening of the college to 
the first class, 44 years ago. The 
publication of official registration fig- 
ures giving a total enrollment of 514 
men was greeted with hearty applause. 
Mr. Bowker *7I, was unable to 
reach Amherst In time and his place 
was taken by Mr. Ellsworth, secretary 
of the State Board of Agriculture. 
Mr. Ellsworth spoke of the kindly feel- 
ings entertained for the college and its 
work by the State Board of Agricul- 
ture and after touching upon the grow- 
ing revival of agriculture in New Eng- 
land and especially Massachusetts, 
pointed out that the best method of 
showing appreciation for the liberal 
state approprlatsons for the college was 
the grasping of opportunities and fol- 
lowing with earnest work 

Dr. Cr.ar.es A. Peters '87, a new 
member ot the faculty, contrasted the 
educational systems of this country 
and Germany, and the attendant 
growth of military spirit In the latter. 
The military instruction here should 
be made to count for something in the 
armed reserve strength of this country 
and must therefore be studied well. 
In Introdclng William Wheeler '71, 
President Butterfleid referred to his 
many years of faithful service on the 
board of trustees. Mr. Wheeler an- 
nounced his intention of relating a few 
reminiscences of life at the Massa- 
chusetts of his student days and hoped 
that some Inspiration might be derived 

from them. 

Dr. Robert J. Sprague after an- 
nouncing that he was slated to speak 
on no subject and intended to carry It 
out to the letter stralghway spoke on 
the democratic tendencies In our col- 
leges today and of the new nobility 
composed of men who have not only 
the virile strength of the individual but 
the ability and power to use It for their 
fellows and not against them. 

After Frederick Yeaw '05, the 
"freshman" member of the faculty as 
he called himself had spoken of the 
desirability of working while here, the 
president told of his long search for a 
man who could fill the position of 
assistant dean and In Professor Lewis, 



ii 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 3, 191 1. 



was sure that he had secured such a 
man. In an ingenious play upon 
words that kept his hearers roaring 
with laughter Mr. Lewis told of his 
perplexity before coming here and his 
subsequent impressions after arriving. 
His plea was for the explification of 
of the social aspects of M. A. C. life. 
'Show your fellow students; bubble 
over when a team wins; support all 
activities and thus develop your minds 
and characters. The greatest need 
of college men is to be dead In earnest 
and of this college and its men to be 
dead in earnest about the social wel- 
fare of the students and faculty. " 

President Butterfield closed the 
evening with a few words. He said 
In part. "To me these gatherings are 
a constant inspiration. When I look 
over an assemblage like this, I cannot 
but think of the marvelous power for 
good or evil, tied up in a bunch of 
college men. I hate to think that 
there may be one man In our 500 
who shall not live to his full caoactty 
of service not only to college but com- 
monwealth and country. We have 
passed the 500 mark, shall we be sat- 
isfied? My hope is that out of this 
meeting may grow an inspiration for 
the year 1 9 1 1 - 1 9 1 2 for greater earnest 
ness. The late of the college rests 
upon us. The answer to ail criticism 
of the institution Is with us. May we 
then have a conservation and utilization 
of our t>est powers in work for the old 
cohere, a get together spirit of the 
cooperation that shall advance our 
Alma Mater stii) further." 



SIGNAL COMP'-TITION 

CConKnued from p>«e ij 



four dollars ($4.00) at the regular 
rat • 

Eacii I wo hours worK to be given at 
the direction of the Business Manager. 

The Business Manager will be in 
charge of competition in this depart- 
ment. A new position, that of Adver- 
tising Manager has been created In 
this department, and the men apoolnted 
to the board will eventually rise to this 
position or to that of Business Manager. 

M. C. Pratt • 12 has been appointed 
competition editor, and he will be glad 
to answer any question that candidates 
may desire to ask concerning the com- 
petition. All candidates must give 
their names to him before the:y can 
compete. Competition starting at 
once and will continue until March 1st, 
1912, and Is open to any member of 
the three lower classes. 

DARTMOUTH GAME 

CContlnued from page 1 1 

on the receiving end of many of the 
forward passes and Smith took his 
place. Gore went in at quarterback 
and Ojntinued the open plays. An 
exchange of punts followed and the 
quarter ended with the ball in Dart- 
mouth territory. 

During the last period Massachu- 
setts showed her best football. Open 



plays were constantly used and proved 
very successful. Dartmouth seemed 
U'lable to make continual gains and 
the play was In her territory the 
greater part of the tiine. Jones made 
a long gain by a trick play, and for a 
moment seemed on the way to a score. 
Brewer broke through the line and had 
a clear field before hiin, but slipped in 
the soft ground. The game was quite 
free from penalties, both teams suffer- 
ing about alike in this respect. 
Llewellyn, the Dartmouth quarter, 
played a fast game while Hogsett, 
Estep and Dudley proved strong on 
defensive and offensive work. 

For the Aggie team Hubert and 
Sampson played by far the best game. 
Sampson was in every play, whi e | 
Hubert tore things up from one end to i 
the other. Brewer proved a consist- j 
ent ground gainer and bore the brunt 
of the work in the backfield. The ; 
ends played a fair gaine on tht 
defense, but showed their best work in 
recovering forward passes. 

The summary: 



DARTMOUTH. 

Capt. Daley, le. 
Margeson, le, 
Elcock, It. 

Whitmore. Dunbar, Ig, 
Gibson, c. 
Beer, Farnum, rg, 
Burends. Engelhorn, rt. 
Estep. re. 
Ucwellyn, qb. 
Estep. qb, 
Hogsett, Ihb, 
Dana. Morey. rhb. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

re, Lju-son 

re. Smith 

rt, Hayden 

rg, Capt. Walker 

c, Hubert 

Ig, Baker 

rt, Samson 

le. Jones, Huntington 

qb. Smith 

qb. Smith, Gore 

rhb. Nisson 

Ihb. Brewer 

fb, Merrill 

Touchdown-s — 

Estep. Coals 



Dudley, fb. 

Score— Dartmouth 22. 
Morey, Hopwtt, Dudley, 
from touchdowns, Barends, Hogsett. 
Umpire— Andrews, Yale. Referee— Mc- 
Gri^, Boston college. Field judge — 
Braggs, Wesleyan Linesman — Boyle. 

Dartmouth. Time— four 10 min. periods. 



SOCIAL UNION ENTERTAIN- 
MENT 

The first of the Social Union's fall 
and winter entertain.nents was given 
last Saturday evening in the Chapel. 
Henry H. Clayton, the well-known 
balloonist and meteorologist, delivered 
an illustrated lecture on "Aviation." 
He outlined the steps in the conquest 
of the air, begining with the hydrogen 
balloon, taking up next the dirigible and 
finally ending with a description of the 
heavier-than-air machines and of many 
of the present day types of aeroplanes. 
The Illustrations was very good, es- 
pecially the bird's-eye views. 



RESULT OF SATURDAY'S FOOT- 
BALL GAMES 

Harvard 15, Bates 0. 
Yale 26, Holy Cross 0. 
Tufts 1 1 , Worcester Tech. 0, 
Brown 56, New Hampshire 0. 
Dartmouth 22. M. A. C. 0. 
Amherst 3, Springfield T. S. 0. 
Rhode Island 3, Maine 0. 
Williams 0, Rensselaer 0. 



75.— H. S. Carruth, present 
address, Amherst. 



UP-TO-DATE 



* COLLEGE FOOTWEAR* 



Elite Shoes, 
Swell Shod Shoes, 
Pumps the fit, - 



$3.50 to $5.00 

- $5.00 and $6.00 

$4.00 



EXPERT REPAIRING 



PAGE'S Shoe Store, 



BKTWKKN THK BANKS 



The College Signal, Tuesday. October 3. ^9" 



E. E. MILLETT TlIE WoRTIlV 



Jeweler and Optician. 



Violii, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

I.KNs OKINlMMi 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



Kodaks, 

Eastman Films, 

Victor Talking 
Machines, 

Victor Eecords, 

Fountain 
Pens, 

Leather Goods. 



FKANK H. DANFORTH, Mr.R, 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



Amherst Corner in Rathnkellar. 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Mailers 
of 



de:ue:i.*s 



DRUG STORE 



CAR & OOWNS 

To the .American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. • 



The Prospect House 



Good Board and 
Clean, Airy Rooms 

MRS. E. EI. PERRY 

Ihere are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 



or 



C. R. ELDER 



THE 



Hoover & Smith Go. 



616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 



Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 



Phlladelpliia's Official Fraternltn Jeweler 



SPECIALISTS IN 

Fraternity Badges. Fobs. Novelties. 
Rings, Charms ..... Prizes Trophies 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, Charms.-. 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS 

Fine Repatrinf a Specialty 
Custom Work 



Holland's Block. 



Phoenix Row 



MIL-L_S 
rnoTOGi^ArHER 

The best workmanship. 

The latest styles. 

Reasonable prices 

Lincoln Building, Amherst, Mass. 

YOU WILL FIND 
A FULL LINE 



OF 



im & GioaietlK 



TOBACCO 



AT 



The College Drug Store 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'71.— L. A. Nichols, constructive 
engineer, Chicago. 111., is president of 
the Chicago Steel Tape Company. 

'71.- Edgar E.Thompson, principal 
and supervisior of public schools. Wor- 
cester, has ceen president of the Wor- 
cester County Schoolmaster's Club 
for the year 1910-11. 

•71._After Oct. 1st George C. 
Woolson's address will be Riverview 
Manor. Summit Driveway. Hastings- 
on-Hudson, N. Y. 

72.— Frank C. Cowles. 31 Grand 
St., Worcester. 

'72.— Charles O. Flagg has re- 
signed position of superintendent Mix- 
ter Creamery Stock Farms and is now 
superintendent of the Paige Demon- 
stration Farms. Hardwick. 

'72.— E. G. Howe. Chicago. 1. 1., a 
science teacher in Englcwooo High 
School, spent the summer in Japan. 
He visited his sister. Miss Annie L. 
Howe who has charge of the trainmg 
school for kindergarten teachers. 

'74.— Edgar H. Libbey, Clarkston, 
Wash., was actively connected with 
the reorganization of the Lewlston- 
Clark.ston Company, a company inter- 
ested in irrigation and power develop- 
ment. 

•74,___Harrie McKeen Zeiler. 
Hagerstown. Md., was county chair 
man M the Prohioltion party for Wash- 
ington County, and a member of the 
state commitee. 

'74.— Daniel G. Hitchcock. War 
ren, Is agent for fire, health, and 
accident insurance. He conducts 
touring parties to the Catskills, Flor- 
ida and Nassau in the B^han.as. He 
Is also agent for the Monation Rsalty 
Investing Corporation of New York. 

'76._Wiiham H. Porter, Agawam, 
was chairman of the Mt. Tom State 
Reservation Commission. 

'78.— Arthur Amber Brigham. 
Ph. D., Principal of South Dakota 
School of Agriculture and Director of 
Summer School and of College Exten- 
sion is Director of the North American 
Laying Competition. 

•78.— Amos L. Spofford, deceased. 
78. Rufus P. Woodbury Is sec- 
retary of the National Live Stock 
Exchange. 

'80.— Alvan L. Fowler, change of 
address 4 13 Post-office Building, Phila- 
delphia. Pa., National Bank Examiner. 
•80.— William G. Lee. Municipal 
Engineer, Holycke, has removed to 
Corning, Cal., where he is engaged 
in fruit growing. 

'81. Henry E. Chapin, president 

of the New York M. A. C. Club, lec- 
tured before the Brooklyn Institute of 
of Arts and Sciences. 

'81. E. D. Home has been 

engaged to deliver an address at the 
annual meeting of the Vermont Dairy- 
man's association jaji. 12, 1912. 



rKir«i«sroo*c.! Sanderson 

L * >i*9 / /f/1 




&> Thompson 

lail 
Announcement !! 

Our Fall and Winter Oulfutiug for 
students is lu.w ready. Vou may 
conlulenlly look to this store for the 
very Litest fashions. 

Oyf Pfices M\ Pieveiit a Sale 

We w.mt y<ni to feel at iiertetl 
lilicriy to lo<.k as loiig aiul as often as 
you like without buying. 

This is thf home of the Hart, 
SchafnerX Marxtlothe.s. 

lntL-r«<>v<n iiosc in all ftradea, 
250. 35c and 50c. 

phoenix silk h^'^• 

The Arrow liraiid ami H. « I. 
collars. 

Kverything you may need for your 
wardrobe at pri<es no one can under- 

M-ll. 



Sanderson 

&f Thompson 

ClotWers, Hitters, Tailors 



Established 




1851 



Jifr ?»r 



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205-211 Third Ave., Cor. J 8th SU - - ' Rcw York 



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Chemicals, Chemical, Physical, Bacteriological 
Apparatus and Assay Goods 

Our Euro,H.an connections are such that we are enabled to offer you 
the best servKe for duty-free importations un suentiftc suppl.es at the 
lowest prices. 



Wc carry the largest stock of Laboratory Supplies in the U. S. 



PROMPT SERVICE 



(ConitmMd on |«t* 5.) 





The College Signal, Tuesday, October 3. '9"' 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 3, 191 1. 



THE COL LEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 

the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

ALDEN C. BRETT, 1912 Edrtor-tn-Chle(. 

MARSHALL C. PRATT. 1912. Assistant Editor. 
JESSECARPENTER. JR .1912 M.iuirlne Editor. 
ROYAL N. HALLOWELL. 1912, Ath'.atlcs. 

JOSEPH A. HARLOW. 1912. Athletics. 

SILAS WILLIAMS. 1912. Department No»et. 

OSCAR C. ANDERSON. 1913. Ahjmni Notes 
R. H. VANZWALENBURC. 191 3. College Notes. 
S. MILLER JORDAN 1913, College Note*. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMEWT. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912. Business Manager. 

GEORGE ZABRISKIE 1913 As«. Bus. Manager 
ERNEST S. CLARK. JR.. 1914. Circulation. 

CHESTER E. WHEELER. 1914, Circulation. 
STUART B. FOSTER. 1914. C'rculatlon. 

Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Albbrt W. Dodge. 



Entered ■■ •eoond-class matter at the Amlieret 
Pwl Office. 



Vol. XXU. TUESDAY, OCT. 3. No. 3 



On another page will be found the 
announcement of the competition for 
membership on the Signal Board. This 
is a chance for the men who, perhaps, 
have no talent for the musical club or 
the dramatic society to display their 
ability as writers or business managers. 
Do not be bashful about coming out. 
especially Freshmen. Show your 
athletically Inclined room-mate that he 
Is not the only one who can maJce a 
aame for himself. Competition is 
open to all. 



At a recent meeting of the Signal 
board, R. H. Van Zwalenburg '13 of 
Rutherford, N. J., was elected assis- 
tant editor of the board. 

H. H. Clayton gave a well Illustra- 
ted lecture on aviation in the Chapel. 
Saturday evening. This is the first 
of the series of Social Union Saturday 
night entertainments. 

A large delegation from college wit- 
nessed Amherst's 3-0 victory over 
Springfield. The score was a poor 
indication of the respective merits of 
the teams. 

The stock-judging team left for the 
Brockton fair Sunday night. The 
men composing It are Madison, 
Weaver and Southwick, alternate. 

The Informal committee for this 
year will be made up as follows: A. C. 
Brett, Chairman; E. M. Boland, 
Treasurer; T. J. Moreau, F. S. Mer- 
rill, Rayinond K. Clapp. William R. 
Bent. Everett H. Cooper, Albert F. 
Edmlnster. The first Informal will be 
held October 14, the day of the Wor- 
cester Tech game. 

The number of students registered 
was announced by President Butter- 
field at the "College Night" last 
Friday as follows: 

Post graduates, 7 

Seniors, 84 

Juniors, 98 

Sophomores. 125 

Freshmen. 174 

Unclassified, 26 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 




And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full Hue of College Supplies 
may be found at 



It's a good thing not to worry about 
your pedal apparel, its correct, style 
comfort or durability. 

Buy your shoes from 

The SHOP ]UM TUB style 

•' Walk Over," Haywood Shoes, 

13-50, 14-00, $5-00 



EW ELL'S 



BoUes " Special, " Stetson Shoes, 

fS.oo to $8.00 

RKPAIRING DEPARTMENT 

E.M.BOLLBS 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Next to Corner Drug Store. 



Total, 



514 



The first Informal will be held Sat- 
urday Oct. 18. Immediately after the 
Worcester Tech game. For the ben- 
efit of the new men it should be stated 
that although under the direct control 
of the fraternities, the Informals are 
held for the benefit of every man in 
college, and should have the support 
of the entire student body. As their 
name Implies they are strictly Informal 
and no hesitancy need be felt by even 
the greenest freshman on that account. 
Future plans of the committee will 
depend upon the success of this the 
first one, every man who can possibly 
attend should plan to ao so. Special 
cars will be run to both Northampton 
and South Hadley and men desiring 
seats are asked to sign up promptly. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

(Notices for this column should be dropped In the 
SioNAL Omceor handed to M. C. Pratt 12. on or 
before the Saturday precedlne each Issue. ] 

Oct. 3—6-45 P. M. Stockbrldge club, 
Agricultural Recitation room. 

Oct. 4—1-30 P. M. Assembly. Presi- 
dent Kenyon L. Butterfield. 

Oct. 5—6-45 p. M. Y. M. C. A. meet- 
ing In the Chapel. 

Oct. 7— Football, M. A. C.vs. Brown 
at Providence, R. I. 
6-30 p. M. Social Union enter- 
tainment In Drill Hall. Prof. 
Edward M. Lewis. 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



Angler, '13. 



Clark, '13. 



We have a full line of Hanners, I'ost 
Cards, College Songs, Seal I'apers, Foun- 
tain Pen*, Candy, Tonic and Student 
Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

basement of no. college 



Eldridge, '14. 



Tarbell, '14. 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Block 
Amherst, Mass. 



COLLEGE NOTES 

The first half of the 19 13 /ndex 
went to press last Saturday. 

Professor Sears judged apples at the 
Valley Fair at Brattleboro, Vt., last 
Tuesday. 

The Metawampe Club's initial trek 
was made, Saturday, to Mt. Lincoln. 
There were 38 In the party. 

The college "Tub" will soon be 
splashing. Pea-grten waterwings may 
be procured at the College Store. 

Mysterious nightly vanishing of both 
freshmen and sophs would suggest that 
the class rope pull teams are rapidly 
rounding into shape. 



C&rp^rx-ler & TAoreKoust, 

PRINTERS. 



No. 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mast. 



ASSEMBLY 

The speaker at the Wednesday as- 
sembly was E. F. Richardson '87, of 
Millls, who took as his theme "Oppor- 
tunity." He pointed out the oppor- 
tunities offered to college men in dif- 
ferent lines of work closely allied with 
agriculture, and laid especial stress on 
the splendid opportunities awaiti g in 
scientific farming. 

Mr. George S. Ladd of Siurbridge 
was the scheduled speaker, but at the 
last moment found that he could not 
come, so the President secured Mr. 
Richardson on very short notice. 



'06. C. E. Hood has severed his 

connections with the United States 
Department of Agriculture and Is now 
employed by the Porto Rico sugar 
producers' association, Champaign, 111. 



H. E. KINSMAN, 

College Pbotograpber 

NASH BLOCK, MAIN ST., 
AMHERST, :: MASS. 

High-grade artistic work. Perfect satisfaction guaranteed. 

Studio newly equipped with large sky light 

and special lense for large 

groups. 

All styles the latest. Fine picture framing. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

[Continued from page 3] 



Athletic Outfitters 

Complete line of 

Foot Ball, Base Ball 

Track and 

Hockey Supplies 



SWEATERS AND 

SWEATER JACKETS 



The M. A. C. .Agent is Thomas 
Hemenway. 1912. Kindly refer all 
orders to him. 



WM. READ & SONS 



IJOSTON, MASS. 



THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CLEANSING. 

PRESSING. 

REPAIRING. 

Qiiickostil«rvlce, Bent Work, I.owt-M ITl«.«! 

All woik carefully done. Work called for and 
delivered. Cients' overcoats, suit*, uants and 
coats. Ladies' hne linen suits a sjiecialtv. 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rear Nash Bl'k, Amherst. 



Tel. No. 342-4 



'8l._F. H. Fairfield, 1 53- 1 54th 
Ave., East Orange. N. J., is super- 
intendent of the Electrolytic Chemical 
Works. 

'81. — Elmer D. Howe, class secre- 
tary, is in line with the modern dairy- 
men, "producing the milk that needs 
no washing." 

'81,— Austin D. Peters. Veterlna- 1 
rian, M. R. C. V. S.. London, for-! 
meriy of Jamaica Plains, has pur- 
chased a farm and moved to Harvard. 
'81. — Edward B. Rawson received 
the degree of Master of Pedagogy from 
New York University during the past 
year. 

'81.— C. E. Young, M. D.,ls Med- 
ical Director cf "The Keeley Insti- 
tute," Columbia, S. C. 

'82.— Herbert MyrICK, president 
Orange Co., has established the semi- 
monthly educational journal. School 
Agriculture, Domestic Science and 
Manual Training. He also established 
the "vttVXy , Orange Jwid Nortfrt/est 
Farmstead, coverlrg the states of 
Minnesota, the Dakotas. Wyoming, 
Montana, Idaho, Oregon and Wash- 
ington. During a vactlon In Europe 
this summer Editor Myrick was 
granted a special Interview with the 
king of Italy. 

'82. — Charles S. Plumb, professor of 
Animal Husbandry. Ohio State Univer- 
sity has published "A Partial Index to 
Animal Husbandry Literature." 

»82.— James S. Williams. Glaston- 
bury, Conn., is president of the Wil- 
liams Brothers Manufacturing Co. 

'83. — D. O. Nourse has resigned 
his position as professor of Animal 
Husbandry, Clemsoti College, S. C. 
He is situated on a fruit farm near 
Newburgh, N. Y. 

'83.— Charles H. Preston, Hawth- 
orne, bank president, has been reap- 
pointed trustee of this college. 

'83.— Homer J. Wheeler. M. A., 
Ph. D., director of the R. 1. Experi- 
ment Station and professor of Geology, 
Is president of the American society of 
Agronomy, and received the honorary 
degree of Sc. D., from Boston Uni- 
versity during the past year. He is 
also vice-president of the section of 
Agricultural Chemistry of the next 
International Congress of Applied 
Chemistry (1912). 

'85. — Dr. E. W. Allen, assistant 
director of experiment stations, In- 
spected the experiment stations In the 
Central West the past summer. An 
I editorial by him In a recent Issue of 
Experiment Station Records discusses 
the compensations of a scientific 
career, pointing out some of the 
■ advantages apart from salary and the 
opportunity which such a career offers 
In agriculture. 

'88. — Thomas Rice was married 
on Aug. 19th, at Fall River. Mr. 
Rice is connected with the editorial 
staff of the Fall River Daily News. 



Balanced and Specialized Fertilizers 

Well-balanced, specialized fertilizers, conLiininR the right .imounts 
of available nitrogen, in Vxith chemical and organic forms, with .m excess 
of soluble and reverted phosphoric acid, both for fertilizing and cataly/ 
ing effects, and the proper amount and right form of potash, all thorough 
ly blended together and in forms that will not cake, but rem.iin in a 
drillable condition, and which will act not only in the beginning, but 
throughout the season (fertilizers based upon the needs of the crop and 
market requirements), are what the practical farmer should rely upon in 
growing commercial crops. Alxive all things, he should avoid un- 
bahinced and improper mixtures that have the defect of one element 
being insoluble and another element loo soluble for successful plant 
growth. Think of this when considering home mixing. 

It is much the same with modern fertilizers as it is with modern 
medicine. As a rule the best physicians do not send their patients to a 
drng store witli prescriptions to l)e made up. They are prescribing mix 
tures already made up to certain known standards and formulas by 
large manufacturing drug houses of whom there are perhaps a dozen in 
the United States. In this way they get the drugs they want, the for- 
mulas they want and the conditions in which they want them. These 
formulas represent the crystallized expeiience of thousamis of 
physicians indealing with many rondititms. In critical « ases physinans 
do not put their trusts in prescriptions macie up in sm.dl lots of uncertain 
chemicals by local druggists. Can the farmer aflord to mix doses for his 
crops even if he knows his ingredients? 

DAW/l/DP Fertilizer Company 

Dl/IlIVDll 43 Chatham St. Boston 



F. A. SHEPARD. 

MEN'S STORE 



Kupptnheimer's 
Fine Clothes 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOM TAILORING A SPECIAITT 

Thomas Hemenway, 'i*, M. A. C. Rcpresent.itive 




FRANK S. O'BRIEN 



We Carry 



uveRV. peeo a.d .ACk «°»^%,S;«URr"'" 



Hacki for Funerals, Weddings, I'arlie* 

8 Pearl St., Near Union Sta. 

NORTHAMPTON, • • MASS. 

Telephone 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



HMHERST BOOK STORE 



THE OLD CORP DRU6 STORE. 



H. W. FIELD 

... Fi;0RI{51^ ... 



Roses, Violets, Carnations 



DPP. ACADEMY OF MUSIC, 

NORTIfAMPTON, MASS. 



The College Signal, Tuesday. October 3. 19'^ 



The College Signal, Tuesday. October 3, 1911. 



*ia<^aai56^i^^Nft«^^^!^i^^>^«^i^^^ 



vV'*v*-.^*^v*.-*i-*y"'i'*«r^?*>^ 




GOODS FOR MEN. 



" '90-H D. Haskins, as '-aMas-l '04. -E. A. Back as agent and expert 
sachusetts expert" was quoted in an | or U. S. Dep't. Agric. has taken a tr.p 
article on -'High Grade vs. Low Grade through Cuba and Mexico - -/-^ ^^ 
Fertilizer- in the August numner of insect parasites. He is State Ento- 
the Cuba Ke^eu.. i -^'^^ist of Virginia and E^^o-^ ^^^ 

■94.-Periey E. Davis. Granby.-f Virginia Agricultural Experiment 
won the $500 Bowker grand prize at Station 



C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 



<•#- 



rx 



English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 



'k'^.*»V5aa6<:v(Vi«v- ■ •■•••■ • • • ■ • ■ • * • 



Highest Grade Roses 

We are oflfering to our local patrons, selection from our large 
stock of finest Roses, e.>i>ecially grown for the Nkw York and Homon 

FloWKK M AKKKIS. 

THE MONTGOMERY CO., Inc.. 

HADl_EY, MASS. 

TELEPHONES. 

Amher»t, I96-R. 

f<]orthampton, 660. 



MD. OILMAN C A M.ITKT 

TELEPtlONH 1079-3. 

GILMAN and M OFFET. 

Manufacturers of .md Wliolesaie Dealer* 

CONFECTIONERY. 

107 to til MiklK HTKBKT. 

Worcester, Mass. 



WHY NOT SUBSCRIBE 



the Worcester corn show for maxi- 
mum yield of corn. 

>95 ___-p p. Foley has been 
awarded a two yesrs scholarship at 
the N-iW York Law School. 

•96._S. W. Fletcher and family 
are spenalt:s? a montn's vacation at his 
lOO-acre apple orchard at Fishers- 
viile, Va. 

•99.„Wllliam Henry Armstrong, 
Captain of Porto Rican Rtgia.ent, U. 
S. Ipfaniry. Sa- Juan, P. R..isin 
charge oi tie survey and re-mapping of 
Porio Rico. He is adjutant of the 
2nd Battalion and Quartermaster and 
Commissar, Co. A. 

»99, Dr. Hurds. state entomolo- 
gist of Alabama, has predicted thai 
the caterpillar or cotton worm will cur- 
tail tne cotton crop in that siate tr^m 
30 to 50 per cen». 

'00.- A. W. Morrill has an article 
in the August issue of tlie Journal 0/ 
Economic Entomology o . ••Organized 
eitorts as a factor in the c-ntrol of the 
citrus Whitc-Fly." 

'01.— C. L. Rice. Ass't Sup'i. 
Western Eiectnc Co., address, Narth 
Woolwich, London, Engtand. 

'01. D. B. fashjian. Ipswich, 



'04.— A. W.Gilbert. Ph.D., assistant 
professor of plant breeoing, Cornell 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of Collci^a- Classes. 



I03 Main St. 



Northampton, Ma.ss. 



Wright &Ditson 



Headquarters 
fir 



&lh!etic Supplies 



io THE 



SATURDAY 
EVENING POST 

College Representative, 

L. S. FREEr»MAN, '14 



FOR FARMS ! 

Big, Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building Lots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W R BROWN 

Savings Bank Bl'k, 
Amherst, Ma»8. 

STKAM FITTINO. Teiephone $9-4- 

GAS FIT I INC.. TINNINC. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PLUMBERS. 



jiE. N. PARISE.\U.j« 

HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 



RAZORS HONFJ) 



No. 2 Pleaaant, St., Amherst, iVla*s. 



Specialty of Kepairins 

Church Windows, 
Memorial WiNoows, 
Lea» Lights, &c. 
6CmtonAve., AMHEKST. MASS 



M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 

Orders left at the Amtw-rst House will receive 
prompt attention. 

E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 



WiM.iAM.s Bi.oc K, Amherst, Mass. 

Ofkh H Hours; 



h^ass.. marrifd Ij M ss Victoia Ha 
rootunian cf Prtvidcnce, Juiy 9, 1911. 
•02 — T. M. Carpent-r has been 
visiting physioL^gical unlversiiy labora- 
tories, clinics and hospitals in the In- 
terests of the Nutrition Laboratory of 
the Carnegie Institution of Washing- 
ton. 

•03.— W. E. Tottingham. Pro- 
fessor of Agricultural Chemistry, Col- 
lege of Agriculture. University of 
Wisconsin, has been made assistant 
professor In the university. He has 
published (with E. A. Hart) a text 
book on General Agricultural Chemis- 
try. 

'03.— M. A. Blake is Associate 
Professor cf Horticulture in Rutgers 
College. 

'03. M. V. Tower, San Juan, i 

Porto Rico, has resigned his position 
as emomolcgist at the Porto Rico i 
experiment station to accept that cf ] 
plant insoectcr for the Island. 

'03.- W. E. Tottingham, assistant j 
orofessor of agricultural chemistry, 
University of Wisconsin, spent a 
month's vacation at his home in Ber- 
nardston this summer. 

'03.— A son, Myron Howard. Jr., 
was born to Mr. and Mrs. M. H. West 
of Chicago on Aug. 20th. 

, '04. At the class reunion, held 

I last commencement, the following 
I were present. Back. Blake, Fulton, 
i Gregg, Haskel, Parker and Staples. 



B.scB..!! College SiudenU A. 
and Athletes who ^Jw 



I. awn I fill 
<iolf 

H.iiik»-t n*n 
F..ot lt.ill 
H.-cW. V 
Track ar»(i 
Field •'p'*!! 




». «»» 



vant the real, sn- ^w^ 
perior articles for -''^' 
the larioLS sports^^ 
$^•.ul>1 Insist upon--'" 
those bearing the 
Wright & DItsoR 
Trade Mark 

ratal«»Kiie Free 

Wright & Ditson 

334 Washington St. 
Boston 

NewYorti , . Chicago 

San Francisco 
Proildence Citbrtigi, 



AMHERST 

Co-op LaundiY 

Laundry Work and Cleaning 

& Pressing Rightly 

I )c)ne 

Agent for Laundry. H. W. r.laniy, 'ii, 
C. S. C House. 

Agent for Pressing, K. L. Winn, 87 
I'lt-asaiit St. 

Team collects Mondays and Thursdays, 
Delivers Thursdays and Saturdays, 




Conn. Vft St. h Lines 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new <?reen- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations,violets and chy santhcmums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300- 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

a 7 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from i A. M. to 4 A. M. 



University, is Vice-President of Na- 
tional Corn Exposition. He was ap- 
pointed Head of the Agricultural De- 
partment of the Chautauqua Summer 
Schools, and was elected a Fellow of 
A. A. A. S. during the past year. 

'04.— Zachary T. Hubert has been 
elected to the Presidency of Jackson 
College. Jackson, Miss. 

•05.— H. F. Tompson was a mem- 
ber of the reception committee of the 
Boston market gardeners' association, 
at its fourth annual convention, held In 
Boston Sept. 19th to 22d. 

•05.— J. F. Lyman, Ph D., Asso- 
ciate Professor Agricultural Chemis- 
try, Ohio State University, is lecturer 
In Physiological Chemistry In Sterling 
Medical College. Ohio. 

•05.— A. D. Taylor is General Su- 
perintendent and Personal Represen- 
tative for Warren H. Manning. Archi- 
tect. 

'06.— Richard Wellington received 
the degree oi Mister of Science in 
Botany from Harvard University, dur- 
ing the past year. 

'06.— Stanley S. Rogers, Plant Pa- 
thologist University of California, was 
married July 6, 1911. During the 
year he published a Bulletin on "Late 
Blight of Celery," 

•06.— George W. Sleeper has pur- 
chased a 60 sere estate at Kendal 
Green, Mass. He has a fine large 
herd of registered Holstein cattle. 

*06. Herman A. Suhike. 273 Bld- 
dle Ave.. Wyandotte. Mich., assistant 
superintendent Goldschmldt Detlnning 
Co. , cost accountant Penn. Salt Mfg. 
Co., auditor Wyandotte Southern R. 
R. Co. 

'06.— Riciard Wellington, formerly 
assistant horticulturist at the Ne* 
York Geneva Station, has recently 
been advanced to the position of asso- 
ciate hortlcuhurist. 

•03.— Born, June 12, 1911, at 
Auburn, Ala., a daughter, Jacqueline 
Brigham. to Mr. and Mrs. William F. 
Turner. Mr. Turner is assistant ento- 
mologist at the Alabama Polytechnic 
Institute. 

•09. S. S. Grossman and W. W. 

Yothers recently published an article 
in the Florida (Jrower on "Recent 
results on compounding miscible oils 
for use m controlling the White-Fly." 
'09. P. Cardin, Cuban entomolo- 
gist, has recently written a bulletin on 
Insects injurious to Cassava In Cuba. 

'09.— Oscar F. Bartietl is back at 
college to continue his post-graduate 

work. 

'JO. L. Septimus McLaine is back 

in Amherst to continue his work as In- 
structor in Zoology. 

'11, Park W. Allen, son of Mr. 

and Mrs. S. A. Allen of Westfleld, 
was married Friday. Sept. 22. 1911. 
to Miss Dolly K. Searle of Southamp- 
ton. Mr. Allen Is employed by the 
firm of S. A. Allen &. Son of 
Westfield. 



Rtsm f OR vavEi tobacco 



orchard. Pay Better Th«. Oold Mine. When Fertilized With 

GENUINE THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER! 

raize IS WON bv the drew .mdnson fruit CC oI l.»tl.to«. Wo. 

Their Priie WinBing Acre ol Baldwin Appl» 

OAVE THEM A TOTAL RETURN OP ,7.5.70-THE NET PROFIT WA. M.9..S 



?^'i'\?t^i'/'.^.V\'^lV mSEHOIHE T83inHS PHOSPHITE POWDEB.^oi.'.iy'fRWcSE 



"*•""*• ,,,„, jj^, in the Farn. ot a ITofitable Crop : 

.-„,k»klt TtiAiek wmt a hie aitvantnf*. p«pecial- 
„R CoeMoktimer CoMfANV. \Ty%^t!m^hlA.^x\',o car, to harvest ,n about 



y„u»Ul recall that «e U.ughf .f y„u la,t V-ar Moi. M.« »*/--«" ''i'r\k'^/^J,[^»r Tk* 
i«/<7«. an.t w,. wish t<. s.^v tli.it it Rave us 'r'"[\,ireitine of Thomas Pkosfhaft Ftwdtr. l at 

wf uv(l It. til*- ireet made a sf''"><'*'*r^'^^A Youri truly. 

TMF.RE IS A TRltTM IN ALL THIS FOR YOU I 

The Coe-Mortimer Co. ,m^h-o^k^I*e1rs 5 ■ Chamber St.. N . V. City 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 3, 1911. 



m. J. LapoFle, Inc. 



Proprietors of 



HDrO-LIlfEBY-PBSE 

Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 

Tel. 183. 




ASK YOUR 

STATIONER 

FOR 



Ward's Fount.iin I'cns, Fine Papers 
and Knvelopes, Students' .Supplies. 
Sendfor s.implt;sof Kiijjraved Invita- 
tions, class and Fraternity Paper, 
banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, &c. 

SAMUEL WARD CO., 

WTa rA 'c "-63 Franklin Street. 
▼ ▼ itlXM O BOSTON. 



DUDLEY 

ourrirrER in 

Fine Athletic Goods 

FOR EVERY SPORT 

We clothe the best Hase Hall Teams 
in America. We make the ''Dudley'' 
Sujjerior .Shaker .Sweaters which are 
to day the .Standard Sweaters uf the 
world. We specialize in Complete 
College and Prufes!>ional Team Kquip- 
ment. Uniforms, Base Balls, Bats, 
Shoes, etc, etc. Special Quotations 
to Clubs and Team Managers. 

Write for cataloge. 



Charles H. Duty 



HANOVER, 



N. H. 



BASSALOTTl & GENTASO 

rRUIT. 

CONFECTIONERY. 
•OOA AND 

ICE CREAM. 

BRICKS TO TAKE HOMK. 

CORNER AMITY & PLEASANT STREETS 



JOHN WOJTAZCZYK 



Boot & Shoes Repaired 

FIMST C1.A&S WORK 

Amherst, - - - Mass. 
BOYDEN'S 

Restaurant and Bakery 

Catering 
a Specialty 

196-200 Main St., Northaopton, Mass. 



H 



Massacliusetts Agricultural College 

Forty-fifth year has opened with the registration 
of four year men aggregating 4?! ; to date of Sep- 
tember 23. The distribution by classes is as follows : 



Seniors, - 


- 84 


Juniors, 


- 98 


Sophomores, - 


- >2S 


Freshmen, - 


- 164 



Corresponding registration for other years has 
been ; 



1906 


- 


- 


219 


1901 - 






• «34 


IS96 


- 


- 


81 


Llog. 









Send for a catalog. 



KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

N.neteen Hundred and Twelve Index, 

Nineteen Hundred and Tnirteen Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club. 

M. A. C. Dramatic society. 

Debating Society, 

Public Speaking Council, 



H. C. Walker, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

C. C. Pearson, Manager 

R. T. Borden. Manager 

R. T. Beers, Manager 

H H. Wood, Manager 

S. M. Jordan, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

O. G. Anderson, Manager 

F. S. Madison, President 

L. S. Caldwell. President 

J. D. French, Manager 

W. J. Weaver. President 

E. R. Lloyd, President 

W. J. Birdsall, Presid^-nt 

J. M. Heald. President 

T. J. Moreau, President 



U^hen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases. Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



I. JM. trA^KOVITX 

I elephoiie Connection 

TAILOR AND PRESSER 

Fall and Winter .Suits 

Chevrons and .Stripes 

Put on Military Suits 

Full Dress Suits to Rent 

Gents' Furnishings 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
form.s worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples, of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of ''Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Allen Bros. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGf 5g 



Contractors & BuilderslvoL. xxii. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 10, 1911. 



Painting, 



Electrical Work 



Amherst, Hass. 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 



COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BKST of Cleansing, 1*ressin<., 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

riCKMT aYsrmM 



No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish'r 
Store. 



CARS 



Leave ACKilE COLLEQE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AQQIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mim. paat aack 
HOUR. 

Special Can at ReaaonaMa Rate* 

AIHIRST & Sioiiui ST. RK. CO 



THE NEW ENGUND NEWSPAPEf 

All the news and the Truth 
about it, in the :: :: 

Springfield Republlcai 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 
News fully rejxjrted. 

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SIGNAL COMPETITION 



ASSEMBLY 



Isieven Men Out. More are Needed. 
Chance in Business De- 
partment. 

With the competition for positions 
Dn the Signal staff one week old the 
^ollovlng men are competing: 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT. 

1913— Griggs. 
Serex, 
H. W. Allen. 

1914— Allen, 

Demond. 

1915_E. F. Morse. 
Hatfield. 
H. B. Marsh, 
J. C. Callard. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

1916— M. J. Clough. 
M. B. Saven. 
There should be at least 20 men out 
I for this competition. One Sophomore 
[must be taken on by the business 
[department, but at present there are 
no candidates for this position from 
1914. The responsibility for Issuing 
la weekly paper worthy of M. A. C. 
rests with every man who has any 
; ability whatever in either business or 
I editorial lines. Get into it I M. C. 
t Pratt has charge of the editorial 
»nd A. W. Dodge of the business 
competition. 



Several Matters Recalled and Settled. 
Faculty Committees An- 
nounced. 



SOCIAL UNION 



Prof. E. M. Lawis Tells of the Recol- 
lections of a Has-been. 






No. 4 



^;^0WN GAME 



Team Puts Up Strong Qsmc in First 
Half but Loses afr-o. 



MEETING OF MASS. FRUIT 
GROWERS' ASSOCIATIOJI 

The Massachusetts Fruit Growers' 
[Association held a meeting Monday at 
[the college. In the morning Mr. John 
jCastner or Hood River, Oregon, an 
expert box-packer gave a demonstra- 
tion of his methods. Dinner was 
srved at Draper Hall. At I 40 the 
[members took the car for South 
I Amherst where they Inspected the Bay 
Road Fruit farm. A return was made 
to the college and at 4 00 p. m. a 
second demonstration was given by 
Mr. Castner at the new storage Labo- 
ratory. The members present were 
representatives of the best fruit-growers 
of Massachusetts, among those present 
being Mr. Brown of Boston. Mr. 
Whitney of Worcester and Mr. Priest 
of Gleasondale. 



At the Wednesday Assembly Presi- 
dent Butterfleld gave a short talk on 
questions of Interest to the students 
He spoke about Sunday chapel, which 
Is to be made compulsory this year, 
and also of the new committees on 
student life for the coming semesters. 
The Student Life commitlee consists 
of seven members of the faculty, each 
member being chairman of a sub-com- 
mittee. The members of the com- 
mittees are as follows: 

Student Life; Hurd, chairman. 
Chamberlain, McLean, Haskell. Mac- 
klmmle, Lewis, Hicks. 

General Student Organization : 
Hicks, chairman, Hurd. Sprague. 

Social Union; Lewis, chairman, 
Kenney, Lockwood, Watts. 

Fraternities ; Macklmmle, chair- 
man. Chamberlain. Moon. 

Religious Work and Social Service ; 
Chamberlain, chairman. Hart, Eyerly. 
Wald. Baker. 

Music and Musical Organizations; 
McLean, chairman, Crampton, Ashley, 
Duncan. 

Student Clubs and Societies ; Has- 
kell, chairman, Eyerly, McLean, 
Crampton, Yeaw. Widger. 

Student Living (Boarding, rooming, 
expense); Hurd, chairman, Sprague, 
Kenney. Watts. 

Student Publications; Lewis, chair- 
man. Neal, Wattles. 



DRAMATICS. 

The following men have reported as 
candidates (or the dramatic club cast 
for the coming season : 

1912; Hills. Gray, Wilde. 

1913; Curtis, Hyland. Jordan, 
Molr. Roberts. Griggs. 

1914; Freedman, F. W. Read, 
Sexton. Simmons, MacDonald, 
Wheeler, Whidden. 

1915; Boyer.Cale, Callard. Draper. 
S. D. Clark, Gibbs, Eaton, Hlldreth. 
Hyde, Farrar. Hasklns, Karnam, 
Komp, Lewis, Moore, Rogers, P. L. 
Smith. Thayer, Tonry, R. E. Tower, 
Weed. 



According to the newspaper scribes, 
the "burly" Aggie team with Its 
"heavy line" and "brawny backs" 
threw terror into the hearts of the 
Brunonians. 



West Springfield High defeated 
Amherst High 7-0 in a game played 
on the campus Saturday afternoon. 
Springfield outweighed the Amherst 
team.. 



Pro. Edward M. Lewis, assistant 
dean of the college, was the speaker at 
the Union gathering held In the Drill 
Hall, Saturday evening and his talk on 
'•Experiences of a Has-been" held 
his audience from start to finish. 

Professor Lewis, who was a member 
of the varsity nine at Williams, was also 
a well-known and successful pitcher of 
the Boston Nationals when they won 
the championship inthe late nineties. He 
said : • • Better men than you and I have 
been Interested In worse games than 
baseball. Henry Ward Beecher once 
failed to keep a lecture appointment 
at Yale and was at last discovered In 
the hotel Immersed in newspaper re- 
ports of the Sullivan -Ryan prize fight, 
totally forgetful of his appointment. 
It Is not only among our young men 
that we find this Interest ; I have found 
that the older men appreciate the fine 
points of our national game more than 
the young ones. This wide-spread in- 
terest In sport was never perhaps better 
illustrated than when a schooner sent off 
a boat In a furious storm and the ques- 
tion asked when the steamer was 
reached was "Who won the Corbett- 
Fltzsimmons fight ?" Now we even 
have a literature of baseball which is 
growing up around the national game; 
every phase of the position Is featured 
from the comic to the tragic. At 
present we have 1000 to 1200 players 
employed in the leagues ever year. 
This is paid for by millions of people 
who like to see a square thing main- 
tained and are satisfied that baseball 
Is fair and square. 'Fake' games 
are fortunately a rare occurrence and 
this Is partly so because the least un- 
fairness can be easiy detected by the 
spectators. It has been said that 'a 
has-been Is one who tells of exploits 
that never happened.' So you must 
take my stories with a grain of salt. 

"The hardest luck I ever had was 
when a screaming drive I had knocked 
fell thru the branches of some trees 
and hit the fielder on the side of the 
head. The ball bounded toward the 
shortstop, I was held on third, and we 
lost the game by one run. I have 
many a time, thought to myself 'Why, 
oh, why couldn't that baseball have hit 
the man on the top of the head ! 
• 'Another funny experience was when 



Last Saturday afternoon the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural college football 
team met with their third defeat of the 
season at Andrews field Providence, 
the Brunonians scoring 26 0. During 
the first period of play the Aggie boys 
seemed to play the Brown eleven 
off Its feet for they rushed the ball 
from the kickoff down the field to their 
opponent's 8yard Une where they lost 
the ball on an attempted forward-pass. 
Brewer. our best distance maker, went 
through tackle for a series of plunges 
that always netted good distances until 
Gottsteln was replaced by Kulp. In 
the second period Brown advanced the 
ball to our 25 yard line, then Sprack- 
llng broke through for the first touch- 
down. Brown scored again in this 
period, when a forward pass netted 30 
yards, and gains by Crowther and 
Jones took the ball to our 20-yard line. 
Sprackllng dropped a goal from the 
field. The forward pass, and gains 
through the line followed by a 22-yard 
sprint by Sprackllng. gave the second 
touchdown. 

The third touchdown was made by 
Crowther who, standing directly under 
his own goal posts, received the kick- 
off and with Sprackllng, Bean and 
Ashbaugh as Interference ran the whole 
length of the field, 1 10 yards, for a 
touchdown. After putting In a second 
string of backs Brown made her last 
touchdown In the fourth period- 
The line-up : 



M. A. c. 

re. Larsen 

rt. Hay den 

rg, Walker 

C Johnson 

Ig. Bsker 

It, Samson 

I le. Edgerton 

qb. Core, Mellecan 



BKOWN. 

Adams, Shipley, le 

Krstz. It 

Gottsteln, Kulp, Ig 

Mitchell, c 

Goldberg, Bohl, rg 

Celp, Murphy, rt 

Ashbaugh, re 

Sprackllng. qb 

Marble, Crowther. Wentworth, Ihb 

rhb, Nissen 

Bean. Marble, Metcalf. rhb 

Ihb, Brewer, Smith 
Jones. Sncll. fb fb, Hubwl, Moreau 

Score— Brown 26. M. A. C. 0. Touch- 
downs— Sprackllng 1. Crowther 2. Goals 
from touchdowns— Ashbaugh 3. Goals 
from field— Sprackllng. Time— Two 10- 
mlnute and two l2-minute periods. Offi- 
cials-Referee, Marshall of Harvard ; 
umpire. Dorman of Columbia : field Judge, 
Foley of Amherst ; head linesman. Slsson 
of Brown. 



(CoiitiHs4aa 



3) 



LeUnd Hart Taylor '14 of Peabody 
has been pledged to Phi Sigma Kappa. 



INrOPHAL SATURDAY 



Tht College Signal, Tuesday. October lo, 1911. 



The College Signal. Tuesday. October 10. 1911. 



SOCIAL UNION. 

[Continued from page 1] 



our team lost to a team whose pitcher 
was so drunk that h'^ couldn't make 
out the signals and who proceeded to 
get three balls on about 12 men and 
then struck them out. 

"Superstitions are very curious in 
baseball. Players who had attended 
church on Sunday and had made a 
good record in the Monday game were 
sure to be found in church the next 
week. We always took off our hats to 
a wagon full of empty barrels; each 
barrel represented a hit. Cross-eyed 
women and black cats are sure signs 
of bad luck. The personal habits of 
the men who play baseball are better 
than Is usually thought. The majority 
of the men atteiid church; drunken- 
ess is a rare thing and the morals of 
the best players are exceptionally 
strong. They have come to realize 
that no man can dissipate his powers 
and expect to 'matte good.' And 
especially is this true in the game of 
life. Live truly and half the battle is 



investigators. He will say something 
worth hearing. 

Henry Dana Smith of Rockland, 
president of the Massachusetts State 
Poultry Association, stands in a class 
by himself as a demonstrator In capon- 
izing. He is also one of the leading 
growers of South Shore roasters. 

These meetings will be well worth 
attending. 



MASS MEETING 

Immediately after the assembly on 
Wednesday, a student mass meeting 
was held. The president of the sen- 
ate announced that the senate had 
elected a committee on student ath 
letic celebrations, which was to act In 
conjunction with the captains of the 
four classes. At this meeting two 
senate committees were elected as 
follows: The Social Union Room 
Committee. Moreau '12 and Griggs 
'13; the Game Room Committee, 
Harlow *I2 and Ellis M3. At this 
time Harlow '12 gave the students 
some pointers on side-line cheering. 



won. 



POULTRY MEETING 

The following is a program of the 
Poultry Rally to be held at the college 
Oct. nth and 12th: 

Wednesday. Oct. 1 1. 
Animal Husbandry Building. 
2-00 P. M. Address of Welcome, 
Pres. K. L. Butterfield. 
Response, Henry Dana Smith. 

2-30 — Lecture. "Poultry ke-pingfrom 
the standpoint of the practical 
poultryman." Prof. W. R. 
Graham, Agricultural College, 
Guelph, Can. 

4-00 — Business meeting. 

7.30 — Conference and Smoker. 

Short speeches and general 
discussion by the members of 
the faculty and visiting mem- 
bers of the State Poultry 
Association. 

Thursday, Oct. 12. 

Chapel. 

8-30 A. M. — "Some diseases of Incu- 
bator chicks. " Dr. George S. 
Gage, Agricultural College, 
Amherst. 

"Problems confronting the 
Massachusetts poultrymen." 
Prof. J. C. Graham, Poultry 
Department, Amherst. 
"Practical points in Incubation 
and brooding." Prof. W. R. 
Graham. 

Caponizing Demonstration. 
Henry Dana Smith. 
The college is very fortunate indeed 
to get a man like Dr. Gage to address 
the meeting. His thoroughly scientific 
knowledge and the extremely valuable 
experimental work on poultry diseases 
carried on by him at the Maryland 
station places him in the front rank of 



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STOCK JUDGING 

The stock judging team, consisting 
of W. J. Weaver. F. S. Madison, 
and R. A. Warner, of the class of 
1912, took second place at the annual 
intercollegiate stock judging contest at 
the Brocton fgir. Only the New Eng- 
land state colleges are eligible to com- 
pete. Connecticut state won the con- 
test, with Massachusetts second, and 
New Hampshire third. This is the 
first lime that Connecticut has entered 
the contest. 



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INFORMAL DONT S 

1. Don't miss it. 

2. Don't wait until the last mo- 
ment to sign up for the special cars. 
The number will be limited and you 
may get left. 

3. Don't buy your ticket at the 
door. Get it beforehand. The treas- 
urer is overworked as it is, 

4. Don't forget your ticket or 
money. The other fellows hate to 
loan you and there {^positively no credit. 

5. Don't forget to Impress upon 
your girls the fact that these dances 
are Informal. 



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RESULTS OF LAST WEEK'S 
FOOTBALL GAMES 

Wednesday, Oct. 4. 

Brown 12, Rhode Island Stale 0. 

Saturday, Oct. 7. 

Harvard 8, Holy Cross 0. 
University of Pennsylvania 9. Urainus 
Yale 12, Syracuse 0. 
Princeton 31, VUlanova 0. 
Amherst 0, Wesleyan 0. 
Tufts 49, Connecticut State 0. 
Springfield Training School 6. Wil- 
liams 3. 

Brown 26. Massachusetts State 0. 
Carlisle 59, Mt. St. Mary's 5. 

Dartmouth 12, Colby 0. 

University of Maine 12, New Hamp- 
shire State 0. 

Bates 18, Fort McKinley 0. 

West Point 12. Vermont 0. 

Cornell 15, Oberlin 3. 

Naval Academy 27, Johns Hopkins 5, 

Norwich (Vt.) 24, Mtddiebury (Vt.)3 

Trinity 6, Worcester Polytechnic 0. 



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The College Signal. Tttcsday. October lo. 1911. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 10, 191 1. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOAKO OF BDIT0B8. 

ALDEN C. BRETT. 1912. E*lor-l«-ChW. 

JESSE CARPENTER. JR.. 1912 MM*rinr Editw. 
MARSHALL C. PRATT. 1912. Competition Editor 
ROYAL N. HALLOWELL. 1912. Athletic* 

JOSEPH A. HARLOW. 1912. Attiletict. 

SILAS WILLIAMS. 1912. D«pMtm«.t NclM. 

OSCAR C. ANDERSON. 1913, Ahimnl Noi«». 
R. H. VANZWALENBURC. 13. Asrtiwet Editor. 
S. MILLER JORDAN, 1913. 



BUSINESS OKPABTMIRT. 



ALBIRTW.DODCE. 1912. BuahtMt MuMC«r. 
GEORGE ZABRISKIE. 1913 A«t. Bus. Muwcw. 
ERNEST S. CLARK. JR.. 1914, Circulation. 
CHESTER E. WHEELER. 1914. ClreulstlMu 

STUART B. FOSTER. 1914, CbwhtloB. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

[NetlcM for this soluma thould b« dropped In the 
SioNAL Office or hwided to M. C. Pratt 12. on or 
before the Saturday precedlnf each iaauo.J 

Oct. 10—6-45 p. M, Stockbrldge club, 

Agricultural recitation room. 
Oct. 1 1—3-30 p. M. Assetnbly, O. E. 

Roberts, International Y. M. 

C. A. committee, in Chapel. 
Oct. 12—6-45 p. M. Y. M. C. A. 

meeting in Chapel. 
Oct. 14—3-00 P. M. Football. M. A. 

C. vs. R. P. I. on Campus. 

4-00 P. M. First Informal In 

Drill Hall. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 




SalweripHon fl.SO per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Albekt W. Dodoi. 



Baiarad m SMond-daaa mattw at tha AmkMM 



Vol. XXII. TUESDAY, OCT. 10. No. 4 



The football game and Informal 
next Saturday is an opportunity that 
no man who is able to can afford to 
miss. Don't put it off and then wish 
later that you had begun before. 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



Begin to get a little spirit into your- 
selves and into the team in expecta- 
tion of the Springfield game. Com- 
parative scores would indicate that a 
hard contest is to be expected. Don't 
wait to be driven to It by the over- 
worked cheer leader. 



The social union room Is now com- 
pleted and within a few days will be 
put in It's permanent form. This roo'r 
Is meant to serve as a social meeting 
place and as a study room for the men, 
especially those who room off-campus. 
Be sure and avail yourself of the privil- 
eges offered. 



When will the men in the dormi- 
tories get a square deal? The early 
morning explorer groping about in the 
Egyptian darkness of the basement 
and halls is forcibly reminded of the 
horrors of fire or similar midnight 
catastrophe. The turning off of the 
dormitory lights at midnight Is crim- 
inal. Other parts of South College 
are lighted throughout the night. All 
that the students want is all-night 
Illumination of the halls and 
basements. 



SCRIBES VISIT COLLEGE 

At the Invitation of President Ken- 
yon L. Butterfield. the Massachusetts 
Press Association visited the college 
Monday. The members were enter- 
tained by the faculty and dinner was 
served at Draper Hall. In the after- 
noon the Northampton Auto Club 
took the members for a run through 
Deerfield and Hatfield. Among those 
present were Mr. and Mrs. Bcttlnger 
and son Fritz of Plymouth. 



COLLEGE NOTES 

The senate ruling on freshman caps 
was a timely and much needed action. 

Lost — A usually calm and unruf- 
fled smile. Finder apply to J. Harlow. 

About 40 men have come out for 
dramatics and the first tryout will be 
held tonight. 

The scoreless Amherst- Wesleyan 
game was marred by the uncertain 
playing due to a slippery field. 

The orchestra rehearsals under 
Leader Hutchinson promise to pro- 
duce a better organization than ever. 

The freshman tennis tournament is 
not yet finished. The contestants left 
are Archibald, Draper, Lo and Griggs. 

It would be Interesting to know the 
sentiment of the student body with 
respect to the presence of young ladies 
at Informal Union gatherings. 

The Union entertainment was a 
decided success. It Is to be hoped 
that Professor Lewis may be Induced 
to speak again at no late date. 

By the care-worn, haunted expres- 
sion on the faces of some of I913's 
•Mnk-sllngers" we can guess that the 
••grind" section of the Index has been 
reached. 

It Is expected that the •'hash 
house" authorities will shortly issue a 
pamphlet on "Hew and why we cor- 
nered the bean supply." Booklets 
free on application. 

The freshmen held a class meeting 
Thursday evening for the election of 
officers. No officers were elected, 
however, as no candidate secured a 
majority. The two highest candidates 
for president, Lewis and Callard, and 
for track manager. Thayer and Tonry, 
will be voted on at the next meeting. 

The annual Inter-class cross country 
run will be held on Thursday, Oct. 12. 
A large number of candidates have 
been training every night tor the past 
few weeks. The cross-country this 
year offers a special Inducement In 
that the first five men at the finish will 
represent M. A. C. In the intercolle- 
giate race with Tufts. 

Pea-green waterwlngs were In 
demand Wednesday afternoon when 
seven of the most famous or infamous 
members of 1915 were thrown into 
the pond. After complaints of In- 
fraction of rules, refusal to work, or 



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general "freshness" had been brought 
up against all seven, the senate gave 
approval and the sophomores did the 
rest. 

Prof. George E. Olds of Amherst 

College has been secured to deliver 

the Phi Kappa Phi oration at the 

I Agricultural College on Wednesday. 

I Oct. 18th. It has been the custom 

for several years to have some noted 

speaker address the student body and 

! members of the faculty in behalf of 

the lionor fraternity, Phi Kappa Phi, a 

chapter of which is located at this 

college. 

The Potato Culture Club held its 
third annual meeting in Veterinary 
Science hall Saturday, October 7. The 
forenoon session was devoted to a dis- 
cussion of potato growing and practi- 
I cal exercises in p:.tato judging. The 
afternoon was spent In an inspection 
of the many places of inttrest about 
the campus. Officers for next year 
are Charles B. Ward of Pelham and 
W. R. Hart of Amherst. 

W. R. Hart, secretary and general 
manager. 



EVERY STUDENT 

Taking agricultural chemistry should keep up with 
present developments as well as grounding himself in 
principals. We wish every student would send us a 
postal card request for Mr. Bowker's latest circular 
treating of 

AVAILABLE SULPHUR 
IN ACID PHOSPHATE 

It In a "Live" Suhject. The CiKcri.Ak Is Kkee 
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DEPARTMENT NOTES 

EXTENSrON. 

The Exte-.sion department has be»n 
busily engaged attending the numerous 
agricultural fairs in the state, lecturing 
and demonstrating. At present Pro- 
fessor Hurd is in Boston in charge of 
the exhibit of the college and experi- 
ment station at the Industrial Exposl- 
tlon under the auspices of the Boston 
Chamber of Commerce. Professor 
H'jrd says that our exhibition is by far 
the largest and most comprehensive cf 
all the exhibits of the New England 
educational institutions. 

Prof. H. T. Femald has taken an 
exhibit of insects down to the New 
England Industrial and Educational 
Exhibition at Boston. The exhibit 
consists of 25 trays and two large 
cases of common injurious insects. 



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Kuppenheimcfs 
Fine Clothes 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the Frencli Shoe 

CUSTOM TMIORING k SPECIUTY 

Thomas Hemenway, '12, M. A. C. Representative 




FRANK S. O'bRIEN 
LIVERY, FEED AND HACK 



THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CLEANSING. 

PRESSING, 

REPAIRING. 

Qnlckeat Oerrlcw, Heat Work, I.ow«>t Prl«w 

All woik carefully done. Work called (or and 
delirered. (ients' overcoats, suits, pants and 
coats. Ladies' line linen suita a specialty. 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rear Nash Bl'k, Amherst. 



Tel. No. 342-4 



ALUMNI NOTES 
Notice to Alumni. 

Owing to the recent repairs in the 
Trophy and Union rooms and the re- 
newed interest in both, it seems advis- 
able to request all alumni and friends 
of the college who have any athletic 
trophies to send them in. Baseballs, 
footballs. hockey pucks, and tennis balls 
ate especially desired. Any alumnus 
knowing of another who has any tro- 
phies will confer a favor upon the 
i Trophy roomcommittee by communi- 
I eating with them. Please send com- 
I munications addressed to Trophy 
I Room Committee, care Joseph A. 
' Harlow, Amherst. Express charges 
! will be paid on trophies by first writing 
to the above, 

'75. —Prof. W. P. Brooks' "Agri- 
culture" is now in Its fourth edition. 
Recently a set was sent by request to 
Dr. Kulnick. Head Master at Emperor 
Williams' Real Gymnasium in Berlin 



Hacks for Funerals, Weddings, Parties 



t Pearl St., Near Union Sta. 

NORTHAMPTON, - - MASS. 

Ttlefhone 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, lid PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE OLD eORP DRD6 STORL 



H. W. FIELD 

... PbORISf ... 



Roses, Violets, Carnations 



OPP. ACAOKMY OF MUSIC, 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October lo, 1911, 



The College Signal. Tuesday. October lo. 19"- 



5^5«:V^^"i^V3^ 



who spoke in terms of highest approval 
of the work. 

Ex-'Sl. — Winslow B. Howe, treas- 
^^Cmm^C. ^^^^ ^j ^^^ ^^^^^ Williams Ice Co.. 



Students Attention ! 




GOODS FOR MEi 



C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 



*>^ English and Scotch Woolens, 
""if 



THE£ BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMFIERST. DARTMOUTH. 

//.^^^^^'^AA^i^i*;i^^a<?y^^W5«06^«^*^^^S«^^ 



Highest Grade Roses 

We are offering to our local patrons, selection from our large 
stock of finest Roses. es|>ecially grown for the Nkw York and B.»sit>N 
Fi.owfcR Markkts. 

THE MONTGOMERY CO., Inc., 

HADLtY, MASS. 

TELEPHONES. 

Amhtrtt, 196-R. 

Northampton. 6t>0. __^ 







mo.muMAH. c.A. MorrBT. 

TELEPHONI: l079-«. 

GILMftN and M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of ani Wholesale l)caler» 

IN 



WHY NOT SUBSCRIBE 



TO THE 



SflTUiiDAY 
C"!™™!."'- EVEHING POST 



College Representative, 

L. S. Freeoman, '14 



FOR FARMS ! 

Big. Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building I-^ts 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W. R BROWN 

Saving> Bank Bl'k, 

Aiiherst. ' ****** 

STEAM KITTING. Telephone S9-4. 

GASFITIINO, TINNING. 

CHARLES DANCE i SON. 

PL UMBER S.' 

Specialty of Kepairinfi 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Liohts, &c. 
6 Clifton Ave., AMHEK.ST. MASS 



^E. N. PARI5t£AU,^ 

Barber j^ Shop 

RAZORS HONKIJ 



No. 2 Pleaaant, St., Amherst, Ma»». 



M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 

Orders left at the Amhirst House will receive 
prompt .tttentlon. 



and one of the best known citizens of 
Marlboro, passed away at a hospital 
in Westboro Tuesday evening at II 
o'clock after a long illness with a 
nervous malady. He was 53 years 
old. He was the son of the late Mr. 
and Mrs. Ephralm Howe, and was 
born in Marlboro. He was educated 
in '.he Marlboro schools and afterward 
I received a supplementary course of 
Instruction at M. A. C. He went into 
the Ice business with his brothers, 
Irving R. and Oscar W. Howe, and 
when the company became the Lake 
Williams Ice Co. he continued with 
ihe company as treasurer. H-i was a 
member of the common council in 
1899 and 1900. representing Ward 6, 
and in 1901 served as a member of 
the board of aldermen. He was a 
member of the Marlboro lodg-: ol 
Fellows, Marlboro Grange arid 
belorgea to the Union Congregational 
church. He leaves a wife and three 
children, Robert of Belmont. Mrs. 
Fred Potter of Newton, and Pauline, 
who lives at home. He was a man 
held In high esteem by a host of 

friends. 

'94. —Frederic L. Greene, principal 
Reedle> Joint Union High school. 
Reedley, Fresno county, Cal. 

•97 .„prof. Clayton F. Palmer is 
head of the department uf Agricuhure 
in the new Gardena Agricultural High 
school of G-rdena. Csl. Tne schoo. 
is one of the L-s Angeles system. 
All the science work of the school Is 
placed under the supervision of the 
department cf Agriculture so as to be 
sure that it will be properly directed 
The school isstarting an orchard of 
100 fruit trees and a vineyara 
of 40 vines. A 17x25 green- 
house, a citrus lath house, soil 
laboratory, two school buildings, a 
barn and a dairy house represent the 
constructions under way. This 
i is all under Profebsor Palmer's 
management. 

'01. —A daughter. Margaret, was 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Max Shaffrath 
atCoalinga. Cal.. Sept. 7. 

»04. At the class reunion held last 

commencement, there were present. 
Back, Biake. Fulton. Gregg. Haskell, 
Parker and Staples. 

£x-'05.— F. K. Williams, qaanager 
of Kingsford Farms Nursery, Oswego, 

N. Y. 

'06.— G. O. French is the author 
oi Bulletin 335 of the New York 
Experiment station "Spraying to Erad- 
icate Dandelions from Leaves." 

'06.— C. E. Hood formerly with 
the bureau of entomology at Crowley. 
La . is now assistant entomologist of 
the Porto Rico Sugar Producers asso- 
ciation and is located at Champaign, 
III., his special work being the intro- 
duction into Porto Rico, parasites of 
the Sachnosterna. 



Before you get your winter footwear it 

will pay you to see W001.EV, '14, 

agent for 

G. H. BASS & CO. 

Moccasins and Winter Stioes 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. Northampton, Mass. 



Wright &Ditson 



Headquartent 



Athielic Supplies 



iiaM.H,.ti QQjiege Students 



Golf 

KAskfi Ha II 
Foot li.tll 
llocki.v 
I'rack nii'l 
Field >p<'>t' 



and Atliietes wlio 
want the real, su- 
perior articles for 
ttie various sports 
should insist upon 
those bearing the 
Wright & Ditson 
Trade Marl( 

Catalf>ifue Fr«* 

Wright & Ditson 

334 Washington St. 
Boston 

NewYorli ^ ^ , Chlcagi 

San Francisco i 

Pravidenci Cawbrldp 




AMHERST 

Co-op liundm 

Hii^h-Graiic Co/lcoe Work 
LAUNDRY 



Shirt.s. 

Collars. 

Cuffs, - 

Plain wa.sh, 

Same, rough dry, 

Ralph R. Parker, agent, ( 



10-15C 
ac 
ac 

40c per doz. 

- 25c per doz. 

S. C. House. 



85 Pleasant St. 
Francis S. Madison, agent for 191 5 and 

short course, Vet. Lai). 
DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 
Fred S. Merrill, agent, C. S. C. House, 

85 Pleasant St. 
Put full name and addres» on laundry 




Conn. Valle) SI R). Lines 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 

aral department. The new gi jn- 

>uses are now producing first class 

laterial and ve have excellent roses, 

irnations.violets and chysanthemums 

their season. Telephone or leave 

>ur orders at the office in French 

tall. These will receive prompt 

ad careful attention. Liberal dis- 

Dunt on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



OODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

27 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



.UNCHES 
SODA, 



•07._ Ralph W. Watts and Edna 
Mabelle Kingsbury of Dorchester were 
married July 1 1th. 

'07.— E. G. Bartlett with his wife 
and daughter returned to Honolulu 
Sept. 2 after a summer spent near 
Boston and Chicago, 

'07.— J. F. Eastman was on Cape 
Cod for part of his vacation, the rest 
being spent at his home in Townsend. 
'09,— Ason, Russell, Harkness was 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. 
White at North Uxbrldge. Sept. 16. 

'09.— S. S. Grossman and W. W. 
Yothers recently published an article 
in the Florida Grower on "Recent 
results on compounding miscible oils 
for use in controlling the White Fly." 
'10. — Sum' er C. Brooks recently 
resigned his p:)sition at the college as 
assistant in th- department of Botany 
and Plant PathoLgy of the Experiment 
Station. 

•10.— R. S. Eddy and Verbeck '08 
were in Europe for 10 weeks last sum- 
mer, being members of an agricul- 
tural tour, under the management of 
the University Travel Bureau of Bos- 
ton. The party visited Scotland, 
England, France, Switzerland, Ger- 
many, Denmark, Holland and Bel- 
gium. 

»10. — S. W. Mendum is in Ber- 
wick. Nova Scotia working for one of 
the big apple growers there. 

•|0. — E. Farnham Damon, Paonia, 
Colo., is with the North Fork Fruit 
Growers association. 

'10._Willard M. S. Titus is on 
the road covering western New York 
for the Coe Mortimer company. 

'10, — Myron W, Hazen Syracuse. 
N. Y.. representing the central New 
York Interests of the Coe Mortimer 
Fertilizer company, visits fairs and 
other farmers gatherings, strenuously 
advocating the use of basic slag. 

'10.— Robert P. Armstrong has 
resigned has position in Porto Rico 
and is now professor of Horticulture at 
the school of Agriculture, St. Law- 
rence university, Canton, N. Y. 

' I ; . — Edward A. Larrabee has been 
appointed to succeed Sumner BrooKs* 
as assistantin the department of Bot- 
anyand Plant Pathology at the Exper- 
iment Station. 

'1 1.— Robert D. Lull was married 
to Helen Wentworth Pray of Natlck, 
June 22d. 

'1 1.. —Harry F. Willard was mar- 
ried to Mary Porter Hyatt of Leom- 
inster, June 27th. 

'11. Park W. Allen was mar- 
ried to Dorothy Kathrlna Searle of 
Southampton, Sept. 22d. 



ICE CREAM, 



^iosed only from i A. M. to 4 A.M. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

OrricB Hours: 
» to i« A. a«. *.oo*o» *».»«. 



RESERVED EOR VELVET TOBACCO 



Orchards Pay Better Than aold Mine* When fertilized With 

GENUINE THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER! 

The Mai»achu»etU State »o*rd of Agriculture Offered a PrUe for the Moet I'rofit.bte Acre of 
M AMtf httiMU Orchard*. This Contest Has Recently Closed, and the 

PHIZR IS WON BY THR DREW-MUNSON FRUIT CO.. ol Littleton, Meee. 

Their Prize Winning Acre of Baldwin Ap|tle» 

OAVB THRM A TOTAL RETURN OF $7IS.7©-TMH NET PROFIT WA* fSIV.SS 



THISOKC 
FEKIILI 



^z'Ji^i^rAtfiEIOIIIE THOmflS PHOSPHITE PflWDEI.^Joi!/t'^^>'JcKcK^ 



! .. F.!.*ins{I,etter Imm IJirnM Brothers, the Famous Fruit Grower* and OrchaHiats of 

ValesTille. Conn.. Show* I h.it Thomas Phosphate Powder BrinRs a I'n/. to 

Every User in the Form of a Profitable Crop : 



HE CO« MoKTIMEa COMPANY, 
TOentlenien : „. , r, t 

In rifRard to Thomas Phospkale PoM'itr. 

yiiu will rf call that we ixjiight of you last year 
xtatons an-l we wish to s;iy that it gave us mott 
excelUnt retullt. On our p.?*ch orchard where 
we usfd It. the trees maHe a spUndut growth 
with heavy dark grten foliof*. the fruit was of 
txctllent color, and the kt*ptn^ qualitits -were re- 



markabU. ivhtck was a hig aiivantage. <>si*cial- 
ly when we had over iSO cars lo harvest in about 
/iro «w*/ as we h,id thin year „ ,, .... 

W* never saw bett*r {colored Baldwin Appits 
than those we greiv where we atplied a good 
dressing of Thomas fhosfihate Vvivdtr. fk* 
btit sola al retail for ff^.oo Per barrel. 
Yours truly, 

Barnks Broth«r». 



THRRE IS A TRUTH IN ALL THIS FOR YOU I 

The whole story is told in the New Edition of .mr It ...klet. ' Up- To-Uate 
Fruit (irowing," which is sent free if you mention 1 hk Coli-RGR Sional. 

The Coe-Mortimer Co.,m7o^,^|^rs5I Chatnber SL,N. Y. City 

We aUo distribute from Boston. Mass.; BSLrAST, MainR; Baltimorr. 
Mn.; Phiua., Pa.; Norrolk, Va.; Savannah, Ga.; Chari^ton. S. C. 



The CoUefc Signal. Tuesday. October lo. 19^' 




^"TM E — ^ 

PI. J. lapoite, Inc. Massachusetts Agricultural Colleee 



Proprietors of 



»yF0-LlllEBM10II8E 

Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 
Tel. 183. 



Forty-fifth year has opened with the registration 
of four year men aggregating 47i I to date o Sep- 
tember 23. The distribution by classes is as follows . 




Seniors, - 
Juniors, 
Sophomores, 
Freslunen, - 



84 

- 98 

- 164 



ASK YOUR 

STATIONER 

FOR 



Ward's Fountain Pens, Fine Papers 
and Knvelopes, Students' Supplies. 
Send for samples of Engraved Invita- 
tions, class and Fraternity Paper, 
Banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, &c. 

SAMUEL WARD CO., 
w-«r «t C7.6S Franklin Street, 

Ward S " Boston. 



Corresponding registration for other years has 
been : 



Allen Bros. 

Contractors & Builders. 

Painting, 

Electrical Work. 



1906 
1901 
1896 



219 

"34 
81 



Amherst, Hass. 



Send for a catalog. 



KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD. President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



DUDLEY 

OUTFITTER IN 

Fine Athletic Goods 

FOR EVERY SPORT 



We clothe the best Base Ball Teams 
in America. We make the "Dudley" 
Superior Shaker Sweaters which are 
to day the Standard Sweaters of the 
world. We specialize in Complete 
College and Professional Team Equip- 
ment. Uniforms, Base Balls, Bats, 
Shoes, etc, etc. Special Quotations 
to Clubs and Team Managers. 
Write for cataloge. 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association. 

N neteen Hundred and Twelve Index, 

Nineteen Hundred and Tnirteen Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 
Fraternity Conference, 
Musical Association, 
Stockbridge Club, 
Rifle Club. 

M. A. C. Dramatic Society. 
Debating Society. 
Public Speaking Council, 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 

H. C. Walker, President 
George H. Chapman, Secretary 

0. C. Pearson, Manager 

R. J. Borden. Manager 

R. T. Beers. Manager 

H H. Wood, Manager 

S. M. Jordan, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

O. G. Anderson, Manager 

F. S. Madison, President 

L. S. Caldwell. President 
J. D. French, Manager 

W. J. Weaver. President 
E. R. Lloyd, President 

W. J. Birdsall. President 
J. M. Heald. President 
T. J. Moreau, President 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 



All work of a first class order. 
EUctrical Massage 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Chafles H. Dudliiy 

HANOVER, - - N. H. 

Agent, HAZEN '14 



BA^ALOTTll GENTASO 

^^*^* CONFECTIONERY. 
•OOA AND 

ICE CREAM. 

BRICKS TO TAKBHOMB. 

CORNER AM1TY&7i:EASANT STREETS 



JOHN WOJTA ZCZYK 

Boot & Shoes Repaired 

FIRAT Cl-A»» WORK 

Amherst, - - - Mass. 



U^hen Fitti ng Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets. Sheets. Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 

J A CKSON & CUTLER^ 

Teleptione Connection 

TAILOR AND PRESSER 

Fall and Winter Suits 

Chevrons and Stripes 

Put on Military Suits 

Full I )ress Suits to Rent 

Gents' Furnishings 



COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BEST of Cleansing, Pressing, 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

TICKKT SY3TBM 

No. 19 Pleasant St.. Rear Henry hish's 
Store. 



CARS 



Leave AOOIH COLLEGE lor HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 

I CARS 

Leave AMHERST lor AOQIE COL- 
LEO E at 7 and 37 ml«n. P"* •^>» 
HOUR. 

miRST & SUNDERLAND ST. Rt. CO 



BOYDEN'S 

Restaurant and Bakery 

Catering 
a Specialty 

1 96-200 Miin St., Nortkiiptoi, Mm. 



~~j^b Reed's Sons are the leading manu facturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer "'ent. The un, 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

JACOB REED'S SONS, 

Makers of " Gold Medal Uniforms. ' 

X4a4-i4^6 Chestnut St.. Philadelphia. Pa 



THE HEW EHGIUHO HEWSPfcPER 

All the news and the Truth 
about it, in the :: 

Springfield Republican 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 
News fully reported. 

BEST SPORTING PAGES 

The Weekly Republican will be sent 

free for one month to anyone 

wishing to try it. 

\ Daily, %B. Sunday, $2. Weekly, %t. 



THE COLLEGE SIGN/ iL 



MASSACHUSETTS AORICU 



Vol.. XXll. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 17, 1911. 



.5a 



CROSS COUNTRY RUN 

VVon by Caldwell in 36.16 3-5- Seniors 
First Wtth 66 Points. 

The Senior class won the annual 
interclass cross-couniry run last Thurs- 
day afternoon by the small margin of 
seven points. There is little dcubt 
but thai the best team won, and it 
was the teamwork of the 1912 men 
that was responsible for their victory. 
The usual six and one haif mile course 
between Sunderland and the college 
was the stretch chosen fur the event. 
"Dave" Caldwell '13 was the indi- 
vidual star of ihe contest finishing fully 
three minutes ahead of the rest of the 
field. He made the distance in 36 
minutes, 16 3-5 seconds. If he had 
been hard pressed he would have 
surely beaten the present record which 
is about 34 minutes. Youi.g '12. 
Southwlck '12 and Tower '12 were 
the next men to finish, making a vic- 
tory for the seniors probable at the very 
outset. "Ted" Shaylor '15 came in 
for the fifth place, thus earning for 
himself a place on the college cross- 
country team. The other runners 
finished In a procession. Weather 
conditions were favorable for good 
running but the roadbed was rather 
hard on the feet. The officials who 
had the event in charge were G. H. 
Chapman, referee; S. Crossman, 
starter; E. H. Larrabee and R. K. 
Ciapp. timers. 

Following Is the order in which the 
men took the tape: Caldwell '13, 
Young '12, Southwlck •l2.Tower '12. 
Shaylor '15. Bemls '51, Cory '13, 
Shirley '14. Blake 'l3. Smith '14. 
Rendail '15. Stevens '14, Bodfish '12, 
Mayer '13. Baker '13, Johnson '15. 
Gasklll '12, Coe '14. Rogers '15. 
Peters '14. The total points scored 
were: Seniors 66, Junlars 59, Fresh- 
men 48. Sophomores 37. Silver; 
cups will ba awarded the first five who 
finished. They will also constitute the 
team which will represent "Aggie" 
against Tufts cross country team over 
the same course the 24th. Thurs- 
day's cross-country also served to 
start the interclass track contest for 
the cup. By winning the event the 
seniors score 12 points toward the 
grand total. The juniors won seven 
points and the freshmen three. The 
class of 1913 has won the cup bo:h 
years since it has been in college. 




1914 Six-Man Rope-Pull Tham. 
Which took 45 Inches from the Freshmen. 



The Rifle club held a short business 
meeting Thursday, and elected the 
following officers ; President. Mac 
Dougal'13; vice-president, Edmins- 
ter '13; secretary, Ells '13; treas- 
urer, Lesure '13: range captain, N. 
E. Raymond '12. 



FIRST INFORMAL 

A Success Though Not Largely At- 
tt-niled. 



The first Informal of the year was 
held Saturday In the Drill Hall and was 
a success from ev«ry point of view. ■ 
The decorations were somewhat of an 
Innovation and were both pleasing and 
unique. Streamers of red bunting 
were draped from two centers m the 
celling m all directions ; the corners 
occupied by the orchestra, patronesses] 
and refreshments were banked with j 
palms and tropical plants ; a large flag I 
curtained off one end of the hall while 
from the gallery at the opposite end « 
shone forth the letter M done In 
maroon electric lights. 

The patronesses were Mrs. Butter- 
field and Mrs. Waugh of M. A. C. 
Miss Culster from Mt. Holyoke ana 
Mrs. Orcuit from Smitn College. 
Conway's orchestra from Northamp- 
ton furnished the music. The recep- 1 
tlon was held at 4-30 P m. after which I 
dancing continued until 6-00 o'clock 
when supper was served at Draper 
Hall. Dancing commenced again at 
700 o'clock and continued till 9-00. 
Among the members of the faculty 
who were present were Professors 
Waugh and McLean, and Mr. Story 
of the Extension Department. 

Those who attended are as follows : 
1912— Carpenter, Hills, Castle, 
Phllbrick, Wilde, Gellnas, Beers. 
Robinson, Wales, Gasklll. Glbbs. Puf- 
ler. Walker, Heald. Brett, Moreau, 
Bent. Harlow and Hemenway. 

1913 French. Blake, Shute, 

Zabriskie, Harris. Anderson, Jordan. 

JLowry Roehrs. Borden, Walker. 



JUNIOR DAY 



WORCESTER BEATEN 12-0 



191 3 Presents Ttie "Coronation- in 
Unique Burlesque. 

The class of 1913 was not far be- 
hind when It came to celebrating 
••Junior D-)" coincident withthe 
I sophomore-freshman rope-pull last 
i Tuesday afternoon. For many years 
! it has been the custom of the third- 
I year men to make this particular day 
1 one to be remembered m the annals 
I of college life as well as on the pages 
of The Index. Not being satisfied to 
rig up without some general scheme of 
action, the wise ones In the class got 
together and concocted a stupendous 
burlesque on "The Coronation." that 
most solemn climax of British pagean 

! try. 

j The committee on arrangements 
i consisted of Webster J. Birdsall, Her- 
i man T. Roehrs and Fred D. Griggs. 
' This commute drew up the frrm of 
the ceremony and as.slgned the parts. 
At 3-30 o'clock the possession started 
from the drill hall, led by George Zab- 
riskie. 2d, as the archbishop of Canter- 
bury. Then followed In order the 
bishops, the royal band, the army, 
the navy the king and queen, with 
escort, crown bearers. attendants 
and gentlemen and ladles-ln-walling. 
and a long trail of foreign envoys. 

The line of march led to the chapel 
steps. There the king and queen, im- 
! personated by B. J. Kelley, and R. 
C. BUke. respectively, were crowned 
with mock solemnity, and the young 
prince, in the person of S. D. Sam- 
son, was made prince of Wales. The 
royal party then continued to the tower 



Team Shows Ore«t Improvement 
Especially in Defense. 



tContlnu«Jo«I»U«2l 



IContlBuad OB paf* 2l 



Whatever douoi there may have 
been In the m.nds of the loyal support- 
ers of the "Aggie" 'ottball team over 
the work of tne eleven in the recent 
games witn Dartmouth and Brown, 
was quiCKly dispelled last Saturday 
afternoon after the exhibition of foot 
I ball that the men put up against Wor 
cester "Tech." The team that 
" Fcch" sent down this year- was no 
easy one to beat. Tufts and Trinity 
both had their hands full In beating 
them. But the way the Massachusetts 
men went after them was a revelation. 
There was seldom a moment when th^ 
"Aggie" goal line was In danger whit^ 
on the other hand. Worcester was con- 
tinually forced to punt In order to keep 
the ball out of her home territory. 

The weather was Ideal for football. 
Perhaps the large number of pretty 
girls along the side lines helped to spur 
the home team on to victory. Wor- 
cester presented a line that averaged 
190 pounds from tackle to tackle but it 
wasn't long before Coach Hubbard's 
charges were tearing holes In it a yara 
wide. It is true that the "Aggie" 
backfield reeled off yard after yard but 
the linemen deserve credit for making 
these gains possible. Both teams haa 
its individual stars but If any one man 
shone above the rest It was "Mike" 
Brewer. He was always sure to carry 
the ball for big gains even though the 
1 whole opposing line was waiting for hlin 
on a third down. Moreau had littl-i 
difficulty m finding the gaps and Smith 
at quarter ran the team with plenty tf 
dash. Both teams worked the forward 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 17, 191 1. 



The College Signal, Tuesday. October 17. '9'^ 



V 



pass to good advantage, Worcester 
being especially fortunate in this 
departm.int. Clough got his punts off 
well but his attempts at a goal from 
placement went low and wide. Toward 
the close of the game both teams 
showed the effects of the fast pace and 
were content to resort to kicking, 

Both touchdowns came in the first 
half, one in each quarter. Clough 
kicked to Larsen who ran the ball back 
to the 40-yard line. Here a blocked 
punt gave Worcester the ball and 
Clough missed his first goal from 
placement. Massachusetts put the 
ball in play on her 25-yard line and 
Brewer made first down in two rushes. 
A forward pass netted 15 yards. 
Brewer added 10 more through center 
and another forward pass to Larsen 
brought the bail to the 20-yard line 
where it went to Worcester on an 
illegal pass. Clough punted high and 
Johnson recovered for M. A. C. on 
the 25-yard line. Brewer made 10 
yards and Smith 8 yards. With the 
goal to make, the former carried it 
over on the next rush and Smith kicked 
the goal. 

At the beginning of the second 
period "Tech" was penalized for hold- 
ing. After losing the bail on an illegal 
pass, Worcester received Brewer's 
delayed kick on her own 25-yard line. 
Larsen threw Halligan for a loss and 
M. A. C. got the ball on a fumble. 
Brewer made 15 yards and Moreau 
followed with 10. With It third down 
and three to go. "Mike" went through 
tackle and just over the line for the 
second touchdown. Smith punted out 
to Brewer and then kicked the goal. 
From this point on, the play was more 
even, although the "Aggie" backCeld 
continued to tear off some big gains. 
"Tech" came back stronger in the 
second half, but aside from Clough's 
second attempt at a field goal was 
never dangerous. 

The score ; 



M. A. C. 




w. p. 1, 


Edgcton, Curran. le 




re. Kicss 


Hayden, It 




ft. Clough 


Balder, Ig 




rg, Roberts 


Johnson, c 




c. Schopfer 


Walker capt.. Phillips. 


Dodge, 


rg Ig. Drake 


Samson, rt 




It. Howard 


Larsen. re 




le, Lewis 


Smith, qb 




qb. Halligan 


Brewer, Ihb 




rhb. Kane 


Morean. Darling, rhb 




Ihb. Baxter 


Merrill. Moreau. fb 


fb 


Power Capt. 



Score— M. A. C. 12. W. P. I. 0. Touch- 
downs — Brewer 2. Goals from touch- 
downs — Smith 2. Umpire — Foley. Referee 
— Brown of M. 1. T. Field judge — Wood 
of Williams. Linesman — Chapman of M. 
A. C. Time — Four 12-minute periods. 



JUNIOR DAY 

[Continued from page I] 



on South college, and the king presented 
the prince to the cheering subjects be- 
low. By this time it was 4 o'clock 
and the rope-pull took up the attention 
of the crowd. 

After the pull the the juniors seated 
themselves In a large circle and pro- 
ceeded to smoke the peace pipes. 



Miller Jordan then gave realistic war 
dances and scalp dances of the red 
men. These dances was followed 
by speeches and songs. Taken as a 
whole, the celebration was unique and 
attractively staged, The principle ac- 
tors took their parts well, especially 
Archbishop "Zabrisk" and King 
Kelley. "Seth" Howe created a 
sensation in his new "harem-scare 
'em" gown. Some excellent photo- 
graphs were secured of the grand 
parade and other ceremonies. 



FIRST INFORMAL 

[Continued from pafe 1 .J 



Edmlnister. Clark and Hayden. 

1914_Handy, Palmer, Leete, 
Davis, Brown, Edwards, Read, Foster 
and Tarbell. 

1915— Shaylor, Archibald, Lewis, 
Haskell, Bittinger and Price. 

Heath '05, Pray 07, Crossman '09, 
Bickford ex- '1 4, Preston and Selkregg 
were present. 



Y. M 

K. E. 



C. A. MEN IN CHAPEL 



ROBERTS AND OTHERS ADDRESS 
ASSEMBLY. 

A party of Young Men's Christian 
association officials pa;d a visit to the 
college Wednesday and addressed the 
students at the regular assembly held 
in the chapel at 3-30 o'clock In the 
afternoon. A. E. Roberts, secretary 
of the country work department of the 
international Young Men's Christian 
association, was the principal speaker. 
Seated on the platform behind hlin 
were 25 members of the state execu- 
tive committee which has charge of the 
work in Massachusetts. 

Before introducing Mr. Roberts, 
President Butterfield call upon one or 
two other members of the committee. 
The first of these men was Charles 
White, formerly field agent for the 
college and now doing extension work 
In Worcester county. Mr. White 
told of the work that had already been 
done by the members of the college 
Young Men's Christian association 
In co-operation with the people in 
the towns immediately surrounding 
Amherst. 

The next speaker was L. A. Cros- 
sett of North Adams, chairman of the 
executive committee, and a business 
man when not working for the associa- 
tion. He spoke of the advantage of a 
sound training In agriculture and con- 
gratulated the men on their choice of 
a vocation. In a few words he told of 
the object of the committee and the 
work that it is accomplishing In win- 
ning young men to high ideals and a 
pure and religious life. 

President Butterfield then called on 
H. M. Clinton of the Norwood press, 
who is chairman of the subcommittee 
on country work. He told of the work 
of the association in the small towns 
and its importance. 

Mr. Roberts was then introduced as 
a man who "spoke straight from the 
shoulder," and he lived up to his 



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recommendation. After telling a few 
anecdotes, he said : "We are going 
to consider for a moment the rural 
community. Do you know that 80 ! 
per cent of all our successful business 
men came from the country? Every 
president, with the possible exception 
of Mr. Roosevelt, has been country 
bred, and he received his training on 
the great plains. That our greatest 
leaders have come from the country is 
a fact of no little signidcance. They 
have been men with a vision, and it is 
due to no accident that they have 
become great. The small town and 
rural community Is the wellspring of 
the nation. Tnere is an economic 
premium on country-bred boys. City 
conditions are against the trainii g of 
leaders. Whether social or political, 
they are too artificial. The city has 
long since shown that it is incapable of 
self-fovernment, and ii Is the country 
vote that has saved the nation. So 
you see we have a great problem 
before us. It pertains not only to the 
country, bu' to the w-^Hare of the 
nation. The solution of the problem 
lies in our instilling morality Into the 
hearts and lives of men. Now, how 
can we help out?" 

Mr. Roberts then told of the work 
that the college men ar«i doing along 
this line. He cited instances at Dart- 
mouth college and pointed out that the 
men who were engaged in the work 
found it extremely worth while. He 
went on to tell of other experiences 
with men who had worked with com- 
munity groups, especially among young 
men. In closing, he said: County 
work Is in the newest form of Young 
Men's Christian association work. 
There Is some satisfaction In being a 
pioneer. It has grown by leaps and 
bounds until there are now 27 states 
and 56 counties, comprising 2500 
communities, fully organized. Men, 
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AN OPPORTUNITY 

The attention of every m.an in col- 
lege Is called to the effort being made { 
to vitalize the Stockbridge Club. 
Notice has been given of the Intended 
plan of work by which both agricultural 
and horticultural students may be ben- 
efited by the club. This year the 
club aims to be an organization of 
these men and for their Interests. 
Agricultural and horticultural topics 
i will be Investigated and discussed and ■ 
the derived benefits will be in propor- 
tion to the individual interest and effort 
put Into the work. 

Every man Interested in agriculture 

or horticulture Is heartily invited to 

become a member of the Stockbridge 

Club and to "get together" in makir.g 

it a success and benefit The college 

[should have a real live agricultural 

I club. 



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The M. A. C. Agent is Thomas 
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The College Signal. Tuesday, October 17, 1911. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 17, i9»» 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDIT0B8. 

ALDEN C. BRETT, 1912 EdItor-ln-Chlef. 

JESSE CARPENTER. JR .1912 Manarlng Editor. 
R. H. VANZWALENBURC 13. Awlstant Editor. 
MARSHALL C.PRATT. 1912, Competition Editor 
ROYAL N. HALLOWELL. 1912. Athletics. 

JOSEPH A. HARLOW, 1912, Athletics 

OSCAR G. ANDERSON. 1913. Ahimni Note$ 
SILAS WILLIAMS 191?. Department Noter 

S MILLER JORDAN 1913. College Note*. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912 BusineM Maruger. 

GEORGE ZABRISKIE 1913 Awt. Bu«. Man»eor 
ERNEST S. CL*RK JR . 19!4. Circulation. 

CHESTER E. WHEELER. I9U. Clmilatton 

STUART B. FOSTER. 1914, C'rcuhtton. 

Subscription $1,50 per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Albert W. Dodge. 



Siitervd u Mcond-t^M nwtiar al tt* Awl ia wt 

Pom Offica, 



Vol. XXII. TUESDAY. OCT. 17. No. 5 



The cheering at the Worcester 
game Saturday showed a marked im- 
provement over that done at the Rhode 
Island game, still it Is not yet up to 
the standard which must be attained 
before the end of the season. To mar 
the favorable impression left by this 
display of college spirit however came 
a show of feeling of an entirely differ- 
ent kind. The expressions of disap- 
proval at some of the decisions of the 
referee were entirely out of place and 
showed to the visitors a spirit which is 
unworthy of M. A. C, men. If the 
old men were resj,onsible, it is time 
they learned that to be a gentleman 
comes first, to win later: if the new 
men, It Is time they were taken in 
hand by the upper classmen and taught 
what real college spirit is. 



The members of the Stockbrldge 
club are trying to build up here an 
organization which will be of practical 
value to every man who is interested 
in agricultural or horticultural subjects, 
Tne plans of the club are quite compre- 
hensive and cover a wide range of 
activity. It is planned to have discus- 
sions and lectures on practical sub- 
jects, prominent famiers and fruit 
growers, men of practical experience 
being secured as well as professors 
who present the theoretical side. The 
discussions are to alternate an agricul- 
tural meeting once a week and a hor- 
ticultural the next. It is up to every 
man who is interested in these lines of 
work to join the club and help the 
cause along. The club is affiliated 
with the New Englard Federation of 
Agricultural students which holds reg- 
ular meetings to which delegates are 
sent. In this way a man is given a 
broader outlook by being brought into 
touch with men from other colleges. 
Plan to attend the meeting tonight in 
the agricultural recitation room South 
College at 6-45. 

Since Junior da>" under a barrel"' 
will take on new significance. 



COLLEGE NOTES 

There is always a chance for a few 
more freshmen at the Informals. 

About 50 men went on the Meta- 
wampe trek. Thursday, and enjoyed 
the campfire supper and the moon- 
light walk home. 

Those who did not take in the Met- 
awampc trek saw some pretty sprinting 
at the finish of the cross-country run, 
Thursday afternoon. 

Next Saturday the football team 
will play Holy Cross at Worcester. 
The result will be awaited with inter- 
est made keener by the outcome of the 
Tech game. 

First Dramatic club tryout was held 
Tuesday night under the direction of 
Professors Lewis and Wattles and 
some good talent was brought to light 
in the freshman class. 

In addition to those already an- 
nounced as candidates in the Signal 
competition are E. F. Upton '14, 
business department, and G. E. Don- 
nel '15, editorial department. 

H H. Archibald by consistent play- 
ing is the winner of the freshman tennis" 
tournament. From the beginning of 
the tournament he played a good 
game. He took the finals from R. 
Griggs by 6-2, 6-1 scores. 

Patrons of the "hash house" are 
wondering (I) if the ravine will be 
filled in and the present gap in the con- 
crete walk be bridged before the snow 
flies, (2) if a raised board walk will 
connect the two concrete walks or (3) 
If. as of old, they will have to wallow 
ankle-deep through slush and mud 
three times a dav. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



1914 WINS SIX MAN PULL 

TEAMS WELL MATCHED. FORTY-FIVE 
INCHES OF ROPE TAKEN IN. 

The annual six-man rope pull 
between the freshman and sophomore 
classes was held last Tuesday after- 
noon at four o'clock on the football 
field and resulted in a well-earned 
victory for the second.year men. 
During the two minutes that the con- 
test lasted the 1914 m.en succeeded in 
taking in just 45 inches of the coveted 
rope. Both teams were evenly 
matched in weight but the "sophs" 
had the endurance and that was what 
counted in the end. Not for several 
years has a six- man pull been so 
closely contested. Perhaps this was 
because both sides had ample time for 
practice. However, from the specta- 
tor's point of view at least It was a real 
battle, and the best team won. 

Promptly at four o'clock, President 
H. C. Walker of the college Senate 
fired the shot that was the signal for 
the drop. The "sophs" were the first 
to get their heels in and took in six 
inches at the start. For the next half 
minute neither side could gain an 
advantage. Then both sides began to 
heave and inch by inch the rope slip- 
ped through tbe hands of the hard 
working freshmen. Just as the latter 



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began to show signs of distress. Prof. FRESHMEN ELECT OFFICERS 

Clarence E. Gordon, who was referee, I The freshmen met Wednesday night 
gave the signal to stop pulling and the and elected the following officers: 
victoriousjteam was hustled off the field j President, D. J. Lewis of Hanson, 
on the shoulders of admiring class- 1 vice-president; P. V. Kane of Wor- 
mates. As is the custom on such | r;ester, secretary ; H. W. Bishop of i 
occasions, the rope was cut in pieces poylestown. Pa., treasurer, R. \E. 
and divided among the 1914 men as a I Rendall of Melrose; sergeant-at- 
trophy of the event. As a result of arms, C. D. Mobreg of Campeilo; and 
their victory, the sophomore class now class captain, R. E. Phillips of Men- 
has the pleasant duty to perform of j don. N. D. McDonald of Melrose was 
"setting up" the upperclassmen to a j elected football manager. At a pre- 



EVERY STUDENT 

Taking agricultural chemistry .should keep up with 
present devel()i)ntents as well as grounding himself in 
principles. We wish every student would send us a 
postal card reciucst for Mr. liowker's latest circular 



'> 



barrel of cider in the very near future 
The personnel of the two teams fol- 
lows : Sophomores, 1 , Taylor ; 2, Tar- 
bell ; 3, Lincoln ; 4, Wing ; 5. Kliborn ; 
6, Powers, captain and anchor; Fresh- 
men, I, Moberg, captain ; 2, Dole ; 
3, Lincoln; 4, Donald; 5, Tower; 6. 
Jordan, anchor. 



vious meeting Thayer 
manager of traclc. 



was elected 



NO HAZING AT OREGON AGRI 
CULTURAL COLLEGE 

There has not been one freshman 
hazed at th? Oregon Agricultural Col- 
leg : this year, a signal victory for the 
system of student self-government 
estabhshed last year. There has 
been no attempt on the part of any 
individual or group of students to 
evade their responsibility in maintain- 
ing the high standard they have set 
themselves. President Kerr omitted 
his usual address of warning and ad- 
monition, and instead the s'udent body 
president spoke at the first convoca- 
tion, stating the principles of the self- 
government system, and the first issue 
of the Barometer, the official student 
paper, printed the following editorial : 
"The stuient body of O. A. C has 
assumed a responsibility, that of prov- 
ing or disproving whether or not the 
policy of student self-government Is 
practicable. The stud'^nts of O. A. 
C. have taken upon themselves the 
gigantic task of proving the success of 
such a system which will remove the 
false barrier which has ever existed 
between the student and the professor, 
the system which will make the col- 
lege men and women more self- 
reliant, more upright, develop In a 
greater degree the thinking capacity, 
and which will revolutionize higher 
education. This system is the one 
which the students of O. A. C. have 
adopted, and one which we cannot 
afford to see fail. The movement Is 
being watched by educators all over 
the United States, and Inquiries are 
constantly coming in concerning the 
details of the system. 

Now can we allow the plan to fail? 
Emphatically, -No' and the duty 
immediately devolves upon every 
member of the student body to refrain 



A CORRECTION 

In the issue of Oct. 3, reference 
was made to an address to be delivered 
before the Vermont Dairymen's As- 
sociation by E. D. Home '81. The 
item should have read "E. D. Howe 
•81." 



treating of 



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DEPARTMENT NOTES 

Prof. F. F. Moon is the author of 
an illustrated bulletin on the Forest 
Conditions of Warren County. N Y. 
recently issued by the New Yorit Stale 
Conservation Commission. 

Dr. J. H. Shaw has been distrib- 
uting during the last few weeks a bul- 
letin on Climatic Adaptations of Apple 
Varieties. This bulletin, which Is 
considered a fine piece of scientific 
research, is substantially the same as 
the thesis for which Dr. Shaw received 
his degree last June. 

EXTENSION. 

This department has made exten- 
sive exhibits at a number of agricul- 
tural fairs, including ihe Barnstable, 
Clinton, Greenfield. Topsfleld, South 
Framlngham, Amesbury and Amherst 
fairs. The exhibits were accompanied 
by lectures and demonstrations. A 
large exhibit has also been placed in 
the Mechanics Building, Boston, for 
the New England Industrial and Edu- 
cational Exposition. 

Revised circulars for lecture 
courses, correspondence courses, and 
the short winter courses, are now 
ready for distribution. 

ENTOMOLOGY. 

Dr. C. W. Hooker has recently 
presented the Insectary library with a 
number of valuable books. 

LIBRARY. 

Following is the list of books recent- 
ly added to the college library : 
W. L. Phelps: Essays on Modern 
Novelists, and Essays on Russian 
i Novelists. 

Rev. J. Strong: My Religion In 




A. 




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The College Signal, Tuesday. October 17, 1911. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 17, 191 1. 




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CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PLUMBERS. 

.Sj)«ciHlty of KepairinK 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lkao Lhjhts, &c. 
4 Clifton Ave., AMHKRST. MASS 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



A Specialty (if College Classes. 



103 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass, 



^E. N. PARISEAU.^ 

Barber -^ Shop 



RAZORS HONI 1) 



No. 2 PleaMiit, St., Amherst, MaM. 



M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 

Orders left at the Afnh>-r<it liouiie will receive 
prompt attention. 



J. L. Mathews: The Conservation of 
\Vater. 

Powel : How to Live in the Country. 

A. A. Hopkins, editor: The Scientific 
American Cyclodedia of Form- 
ulas. 

R. C. Mayfie: Air and Health. 

Dr. A Lorcend: Old Age Deferred. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'83. — Homer J. Wheeler of Kings- 
ton, R. L was named by President 
Edwards of the Rhode Island state 
coiiege to occompany him as delegates 
at the inauguration of President Benton 
at the University of Vermont. 

"88.- -Mr. and Mrs. Hubert C. 

Bliss of Attlek)oro visited college last 

week, witnessing the Tech game and 
taking in the Informal. 

'04.- Dr. Arthur V/. Giibert has 
been advanced from assistant professor 
to full professor of Plant Breeding at 
Cornell. He has charge of the teach- 
ing aivision of the Plant Breeding 
department whicli has a staff or thret 
full professors, two instructors, aid 
several assistants- Tnere are regis- 
terea in this department at present 135 
undergraduate students and 25 grad- 
uate students. 

'05. — Born, a son, George Wiliaro 
Jr., to Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Paten a; 
Arlington. Oct. 12. 

'OS. — A son, Goulding, was born to 
Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Whitaker, Oct. 
9. at Pelham, N. Y. 

'09. — WalQO D, Barluw, Forest 
Assistant, U. S. Forest Service, 
Helena, Men'. 



There 


are 


4118 stud-juts at 


Harvard 


tnis year 


an 


Increase cf one 


hundred 


over last 


year's registrat.on. 





E. B DICKINSON D.D.S. 

SVin.iA.Ms Block, AMHKksT, Mass 

Ornru llotms: 
i> a<> lie .<%. Al. ..It4 »««>» 1>. .XI. 



Wright &Ditson 

Headquarters 
for 

Athletic Supplies 



R4aeliall 

l.awn li'riiii<, 
,(iolf 

I H. skit H.tl1 
[Foot B.ill 
I II. tW.-v 
, I rack and 

I'leld '"iMirtM 




College Students 
and Athletes who ^ 
want the real, si- 
perior articles for 
the larious sports^^ 
should insist upon^"'-' ■ 
those bearing the 
Wright & DitsoR 
Trade Marl( I 

' ataloRue Vrve 

Wright & Ditson 

334 Washington St. 
Boston 

Niw York CMugo 

San Francisco 
ProfMMef Cambridge 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 



/A; 


r/l-G 


rath' 


Colli'^ 


€ Work 








LAUNDRY 






Shirts. 
Collars 
Cuffs, 


- 


- 


- 


lO- 




Pl.iiii \v;isli. 
Same, rougli 


dry, 


" 


40c per (1 
25c per d 


117. 
0/. 



Ralph R. Parker, agent, C. .S. C. House, 

85 I'leasant .St. 

Franci-s S. Madison, aiient fm i.,t5 and 

sliort course, \'<-f. I.ali. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Fred .S. Merrill, agent, C. .S ( . Mouse, 

85 I'leasant .St. 
Put full name and address on laundry 






rv 



^. 



CHIArSlM J 

5 .' 




JttEERFItl 



sai;TH\/A^f 

DiXftriElOn^HT. 



I ■'■ lUiY 
' iSt>>!t>lttAHD 




Conn. Vallej 81. \ Lines 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
tn.iterial and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

%1 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



dosed only from t A. M. to 4 A.M. 



ROTED FOR Vra TOBACCO 



Orchards Pay Better Than (iold Mines When FertllUcd With 

GENUINE THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER! 

The M.,»s..chu^tt, State lJo*rd of Agriculture Offer..! a f..*e f..r the Mo,t I'rof.table Acre of 
M isiichtm^tts DrchirfK This Contest Ha» Uecently < h.sed. and the 

PRIZE IS WON BY TMH IIHI-W MUNSON FRUIT CO.. ol I.HIIeton. Mm«. 

Their Prl«e Winning Acre ol Baldwin Apples 

OAVE THEM A TOTAL RETURN OP S7IS.70-TME NET PROFIT WA« Mi» S8 



?l?i^?L7zl!.ri^.VH5E|IBIKETH3iniIS PHOSPHITE POWDEI.V ■"•'•^atk ^^ 



ioooLB>'r'KK ACRE 



rb. F .1 .*H.. t.-tt.T Krom B*rn«-. Brother*, the Famou. Kruit Grower* and Orchardnts of 
' Yalesville.ronn.. Shows Ihat Thomas Phosphate Powder Brings a Prixe to 

Kvery User in the Form of a Profitable Crop : 



The Cor Mortimer CoMfANV. 

Gentlemen : _ .,.,,.#,/ 

In reRardto Thomat Phoiphate Pmi;ler. 

Tou will r«-call that wp Iw.URht of you last year 
\-(fitons an.l we wish to say that it g-ive us moit 
txcflUnt results. < >n our i.^ .ch or. hard wh^re 
w^ iiS'-d It. tlie trees mmie a ^plfntUd e^owth 
with heain/ dark green foliage, the fruit wat of 
txielUnt color, and the kttptng qualtttti utrt rt- 



markabU. which was a big advantage, rspecial- 
ly when we had over i W <vrr» to harvest in afotil 
/7t'(»Tir<'*ias we had this year^ . 

We nezrr saw better rolored Baldwin AfPUt 
than lho<e we grew where we applfd a g<wa 
dressing of Thomas Phosphate Pander. Fk* 
bett sold at rttailfor |q,oo per barrel. 
Vours truly. 

Barnes Brother*. 



THERE IS A TRUTH IN ALL THIS FOR YOU I 

The whole story is toll inth» N-w ICdition of our Booklet, 'Up-To-nate 
I>u it Growing," which is sent free if you mention Ihk Collbgr Signai.. 

The Coe-MortinicrCo.,vrpoKTERs5i Chamber St., N.Y. City 

We also distribute from Boston. M.AS9.; BBtrAST. Maine; Baltimore, 
Mn.; PHiLA.. PA.; Norfolk. Va.; Savannah. Ga.; Charlston. S. C. 



\ 



\ 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 17, 1911. 



PI. J. Lapone, inc. 



the: 



I'lojil i( lots of 



HOrO-LllfEBY-llOBSE 



Rear Dra|)er Hotel 
Northampton. 



Tel. 18 J. 



Massachusetts Asfricultural College 

Forty-fifth year has opened with the registration 
of four year men aggregating 4?! ; to date of Sep- 
tember 23. The distribution by classes is as follows : 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

I'tHe RfPairin^ a Spetiitlty 
Custom Work 



Holland's Block. 



Phoenix Row 



DUDLEY 



OUTFIT rER IN 



Fine Athletic Goods 

FOR EVERY SPORT 

We clothe the best H.ise Hall Teams 
in America. We make the •'Dudley" 
Superior .Shaker Sweaters which are 
to day the Standard Sweaters of the 
world. We specialize m (oiuplete 
College and FrofessionalTeam Kqiiip- 
ment. Uniforms, Hase Balls, Bats, 
Shoes, etc, etc. Special Quotations 
to Clubs and Team Managers. 

Write for cataloge. 



Seniors, - 


- 84 


Juniors, 


. - 98 


Sophomores, - 


- '25 


Freshmen, • 


-.64 



Corresponding registration for other years has 
been : 



1906 


■* 


219 


1901 - 


- 


- »34 


1896 


- 


81 


ilog. 







Send for a catalog. 



KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



Charles H. Dyty 

HANOVKk, - . N. H. 

Agent, HAZEN *lt 



DON 



Forget that for your .Mettawampe 
Trek .ind for your hunting this 
fail, you want a heavy sul>- 
stantial boot or a moc- 
casin cruiser. 

WOOLEY '14 

Agent for C. H. Hass iV Co., Maine. 



BOYDEN'S 

Restaurant and Bakery 

Catering 
a Specialty 

196-200 Main St., Northampton, Mass. 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Twelve Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Ttiirteen Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club. 

Dramatic Society, 

Debating Society. 

Public Speaking Council, 



H. C. Walker, President 

Geo. H. Chapman, Secretary 

C. C. Pearson, Manager 

R. J. Borden. Manager 

R. T. Beers, Manager 

H H. Wood, Manager 

S. M. Jordan, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

O. G. Anderson. Manager 

F. S. Madison, President 

L. S. Calawell. President 

J. D. French, Manager 

W. J. Weaver, President 

E. R. Lloyd, President 

W. J. Birdsall. President 

J. M. Heald. President 

T. J. Moreau, President 



fp/ten Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



1. »«. IvA.Ii*«OVIT25 

TAILOR AND PRESSER 

Fall and Winter Suits 

Chevrons and Stripes 

Put on Military Suits 

Full Dress Suits to Rent 

Gents' Furnishings 



facob Rt-ed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For culle^e and military schools, and have won and 
maintain tht-ir prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of "(iold Medal Uniforms. " 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Allen Bros. 



Contractors & Builders. 



Painting, 



Electrical Work. 



Amherst, Hass, 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 



THE TERPSY PAIIIOR 

CLEANSING. 

PRESSING. 

REPAIRING. 

Qiii4-kfat srrvlc«>, K«»t Wurk, Kowfal HrU-r 

All woik carefully dnnv. Work callml fur and 
delivered, (ients' overcoats, suits, pants and 
coats. Ladies' fine linen suit* a specialty. 

Wn. FRANKLYN. Prop. 



Rear Nash Bl'k, Amherst. 



Tel. No. 343-4 



CARS 



Leave AQUIE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AOOIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mlm. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Car* at ReaaonabI* Ratea 



AIHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. RV. CO 



THE NEW ENGLAND NEWSPAPER 

All the news and the Truth 
about it, in the :: :: 

SprlDgfleld Republican 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 
News fully reported. 

BEST SPORTING PAGES 

The Weekly Republican will be sent 

free for one month to anyone 

wishing to try it. 

Dai/y, $8. Sunday, %2. Weekly, $i. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL; 

MASSACHUSETTS AORICULTURAL C04-IJEGE_^ J = 

--^,== .^=^v- ^ — ; — ;;~:^ — :m77~ ' ^& No. 6 



•voku.sntfj 



Vol. XXII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday. October 24, 19 ii. 



CROSS COUNTRY 

Sunderland Course to be Covered Sat- 
urday in Contest with Tufts. 

Next Saturday comes the first real 
test of the cross country team, when 
the regular course from Sunderland 
will be run over In competition 
with the Tufts team. Caldwell, 
Young, Souihwick, Tower and Shay- 
lor will represent M. A. C. All the 
men are In fine condition and feel con- 
fident of giving Tufts a good run. 
Seven men are out on the squad 
nightly. 



SOCIAL UNION 

Student Body Entertained at Smoker in 
Drill Hall. 



TALK IT UP 

It has been suggested that a college 
smoker be held in Springfield on the 
evening of Nov. 18. This Is the date 
of the annual Springfield Training 
School game and the presence of 
many alumni and the entire student 
body would practically insure the suc- 
cess of such a smoker. Let there be 
more of that "get together" spirit for 
old M. A. C. among both alumni and 
undergraduates. 



SIDE LINE CHEERING 



Are >ow doing your best for the 
team? The Tufts game, second In 
Importance only to the Springfield 
game, comes this next Saturday. 
Medford will see a large delegation of 
M. A. C. men In the stands but— 
Wili there be any cheering? Day after 
day the team is on the field working, 
and working hard for the Maroon and 
White, and day after day the same 
story— a mere handful of men on the 
sidelines. The student body needs 1 
cheerlng-practice more than the var- 
sity needs Its practice. The Tufts 
game will soon be down In the score- 
books and in less than a month It will 
be— "On to Springfield." We hope 
tiiat the cheering in Springfield will be 
up to standard. "A word to the wise 
Is sufficient." 



Another Union success was scored 
Saturday evening when the third of the 
series of entertainments was given in 
the Drill Hall. Walter C. Glle, the 
Impersonator, kept his audience In a 
gale of laughter by his clever work and 
droll humor. A little spice was given 
by the introduction of names and sit- 
uations familiar to all men of the col- 
lege. Roehrs, Howe, Zabrlskle and 
Jordan coming in for gentle "raps." 
The evening's program was divided 
Into three parts, the first being devoted 
to short stories and readings, the sec- 
ond part to male and the third to 
f-imale Impersonation. 

Mr. Gile's costjme ImpersonatioB 
of a foolish country boy was especially 
good as was the characterization of 
the city dude. 

As the typical spinster "widder" he 
closed the evening'^ ei.tt.iaintTjent In 
a very clever and natural delineation. 
It was the unanimous opinion of those 
who attended that this was the best of 
the Union affairs given this year. 

Between the acts, Brewer furnished 
the music for the various college 
songs. An Informal dance was held 
afterward. 



PHI KAPPA PHI DAY 

Parker, Torry and Turner Make the Fra- 
ternity. Dean Olds of Amherst 
Delivers Oration. 



^<T 



GOVERNOR FOSS 

Governor Foss and his party made 
their appearance at the college Friday 
last. He was entertained by Presi- 
dent Butterfleld, who In company with 
Professor Ostrander and other faculty 
members acted as escort during the 
governor's short stay. He managed 
to get a brief glance at most of the 
building.^ and adjoining surroundings, 
but did not have time for a thorough 
inspection. A favorite question of the 
governor's was "And will you need a 
new one or additional appropriations?" 
A little after six o'clock he left for 
the Amherst rally. 



STOCKBRIDGE CLUB 

The Stockbridge Club held a rally 
last Tuesday evening In the public- 
speaking room, South College. The 
members of the club are making an 
effort to vitalize the organization. 
They believe that this Institution as an 
Agricultural college should have at 
least one live, active agricultural club. 
Weaver '12, presided. He Introduced 
Professor McLean, who spoke on 
"The Value of the Stockbridge Club 
to Agricultural Students." He was 
succeeded by Professor Yeaw who 
gave a brief address concerning the 
original puroose of the club and how it 
might best be carried out. The rally 
was well attended, and many of those 
present signified themselves as desir- 
ous of joining the Club. 



SATURDAYS FOOTBALL 
RESULTS 

Training School 15. Worcester Tech. 3. 

Army 6, Yale 0. 

Harvard 1 1 . Amherst 0. 

Dartmouth 23, Williams 5. 

Brown 6, Pennsylvania 0. 

Trinity 9, Colgate 0. 

Wesleyan 10, Tufts 0. 

New York University 0, Rhode Island 0. 

New Hampshi re 12, Boston Colle ge 0. 

The Giant (•on//^^ra//brt— published 
by the Junior journalists. 



Phi Kappa Phi day was observed at the 
college Wednesday. the main feature of 
the day being the Phi Kappa Phi ora- 
tion .delivered by Prof. George D. Olds, 
dean of Amherst college, at the regular 
assembly In the chapel in the after- 
noon. Prof. Clarence E, Gordon, 
president of the Massachusetts chap- 
ter, presided at the assembly. He 
explained to the new men the purposes 
and principles of the society. He 
said that Phi Kappa Phi is an honor- 
ary fraternity. Since It has chapters 
in several different colleges, it may be 
considered as Intercollegiate In scope. 
Primarily It stands for scholarship, 
and its aim and purpose is to promote 
scholarship in all branches of learning. 
Furthermore, It believes in the unity 
and democracy of education. Accor- 
ding to the by-laws of the chapter, in 
October of each year there maybe 
elected to membership m the society 
three members of the senior class who 
have attained during the first three 
years In college an average of 85 per 
cent or more In their studies. 

Prof. Gordon announced the follow- 
ing members of the class of 1912 who 
have just been elected to Phi Kappa 
Phi: Ralph Robinson Parker of Mai- 
den, Ray Ethan Torry of North 
Leverett and Howard Archibald Tur- 
ner of Dorchester. In April other 
members of the senior class who have | 
attained an average of 85 percent for 
3 1-2 years' work may be elected to 
the society. 

Professor Gordon Introduced Pro- 
fessor Olds as a teacher and a man 
whose sympathies for scholarship are 
without bounds. Professor Olds said 
In part . 1 have been honored by this 
Invitation to address the Phi Kappa 
Phi society, an organization that stands 
for scholarship. I have therefore de- 
cided to take for my theme "Distinct- 
ion and Scholarship." Societies of 
scholars are as old as the civilized 
world. As far back as we have any 
record, a man who was a scholar or a 
discoverer of some new theory was 
quickly surrounded by groups of young 
men eager to listen and learn. This 
was true in Greece, where we find 
Socrates teaching In the market place. 
It was true later In Rome, where we 
find Plato teaching in the groves of the 
Italians. Wherever these youths came 
together to study we find universities 
unconsciously springing up, and In the 
! time of Frederick Barbarosa many of 
these universities were given charters 



TEAM MAKES ^^T FIGHT 

Loses to Holy Cross Wore. Bra- 

ces in Lasi v^uarter. 

The ' ' Aggie ' ' football team journeyed 
to Worcester on Saturday afternoon 
and succeeded In holding the big Pur 
pie team to one touchdown after 50 
minutes of the very haidest kind of 
playing. The weather was not just 
what the coaches would have ordered 
but It could have been worse. Fltton 
field where the game was played pre- 
sented many very wet and sogg> places 
and a heavy drizzle fell throughout the 
contest. This did not, however, serve 
to dampen the spirits of either specta- 
tors or players who were too much 
Interested In the play to mind the rain. 
Under the circumstances, many fum- 
bles and unfortunate losses would have 
been expected to have resulted from 
such conditions but on the contrary 
such occurances were surprisingly rare. 
Only once did the slippery surface 
Interfere to any extent but that one slip 
probably gave Holy Cross the game. 
The best chance the "Aggies" had to 
score was In the last quarter when 
Larsen recovered a punt on the home 
team's 15-yard line and would surely 
have counted had he not slipped. Thn 
game was close and hard fought 
throughout. At the same time, both 
sides played clean football and the fina. 
score unaoubtedly shows the relative 
merits of the two teams. As one of 
the Sunday papers put it. "The 
Aggies fully demonstrated that they 
I have a fast, game bunch of gridiron 
warriors and they kept the Purple fol- 
! lowers in a slate of continual anxiety." 
1 It matters little who the Individual 
sUrs on both teams were. It was the 
team work that was most character- 
istic of both sides. For the Bay 
State team, Smith, who was In the 
quarterback position, ran^his machine 
with lots of sway aii^ dash. "Big 
Sam" more than once demonstrated 
his worth In the line and continually 
broke through for clean tackles. 
Edgerton came Into his own at left end 
and put up the game of his life. He 
was m every play and tackled hard and 
sure. "Mike" Brewer In the back- 
field played his usual brilliant game 
and proved to be a conslstant ground 
gainer. Hubert, tnough hampered 
somewhat by lack of weight, managed 
to hit the gaps in the line and used his 
head to good advantage. The rest of 
the team played equally as well though 
perhaps not so conspicuously. 

The Holy Cross eleven presented a 
formidable appearance with a .Ine 
averaging 185 pounds from tackle to 
tackle. Davitt proved to be a tower 
of strength but Captain Walker of the 



[Continuadaa p*c« 3] 



A 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 24, 191 1. 



%' 



"Aggies" gave him a busy session 
throughout. The Purple backs shone 
to good advantage on the offense. 
Gibson at fullback carried the ball for 
big gains while Colleary pulled off 
some brilliant runs around end and skin 
tackle. Whalen played the pivot 
position and showed lots of gooo 
judgment. 

The first quarter was for the most 
part uneventful, the ball see-sawing 
back and forth near the center of the 
field. In the closing minutes, how- 
ever, the Purple team made a fierce 
attempt at a score but was held off 
by the "Aggie" defense. The second 
quarter opened with M. A. C. being 
held for downs and the bail dangerously 
near the line. After several exchanges 
of punts Holy Cross ripped off a clever 
forward pass to Monahan who was 
downed but three yards from the goal. 
On the next play Colleary carried it 
over The second half found the 
Aggies on the receiving end of the 
kickoff and the team settled down to 
business. By the end of the quarter 
the ball was again In Holy Cross terri- 
tory and the visitors fighting desper- 
ately for a score. The final quarter 
was all "Aggie." Time after time 
the wearers of the Maroon and White 
carried the ball to striking distance of 
their opponent's goal only to lose it on 
downs or attempted forward passes. 
In the last few minutes of play the Pur- 
ple line was literally torn to pieces and 
only the blowing of the whistle pre- 
vented a touchdown for M. A. C. 

A brief summary of the more 
Important plays follow : Captain Walker 
kicked off for M. A. C. to the Worces- 
ter men who worked It up on short 
rushes to the center of the field. 
After an exchange of punts Holy Cross 
began her first march toward the goal 
Itoa. But the Aggie defense strength- 
ened and and McCabe kicked to 
Brewer who ran it back to his 30 yard 
line. After unsuccessful attempts to 
gain through the line Brewer punted to 
Whalen and the two teams again 
clashed in the center of the field, it 
was then that the Holy Cross attack 
grew stronger. Just before the whistle 
sounded Smith recovered the ball for 
his team on a punt. 

In the second period Holy Cross 
held for downs. Gibson went through 
gu?rd and tackle for 8 yards and 5 
yards in two rushes. Captain Walker 
threw Colleary for a loss and McCabe 
punted. Brewer returned the kick 
and Whalen went 15 yards before he 
was ^tackled by Edgerton. A quickly 
executed shift play with Gibson and 
Colieary as the principles brought the 
pigskin to the 30-yard line. A forward 
pass, Whalen to Moriahan carried the 
ball to the 3-yard line and Colleary 
carried It over on a cross buck. Mona- 
han was forced to retire with an injured 
wrist. 

In the third period the home team 
kicked off to the Aggies. After two 
small gains Brewer punted. The 
Aggies held and Hubert went through 



guard for seven yards. Brewer 

added 10 yards around the end. On 
an attempted forward pass the ball 
changed hands. Gibson tried the end 
but fumbled, McCabe picking the ball 
up and carrying it to the Aggies' 30- 
yard line before being tackled. Gib- 
son attempted a drop kick but Johnson 
came through like a flash and blocked 
it. A forward pass was attempted and 
the ball went to the Aggies. Samson 
opened up some big holes for Hubert 
and Brewer who tore off several big 
gains. Both teams resorted to punt- 
ing and the quarter ended with the ball 
in the possession of M. A. C. in Holy 
Cross territory. 

Brewer punted to the opponent's 25- 
yard lint . The Massachusetts team 
then began to show its best pace. 
Brewer, Hubert and Moreau took turns 
carrying the ball for yard after yard. 
But as the goal line was neared, Holy 
Cross would hold for downs and kick 
out of danger. As the game was near- 
ing its close Brewer sent one of his 
low punts toward the purple backs, 
Larsen recovered the ball on the home 
team's 15 yard line and would have 
scored but for an unfortunate toss. 
Before Brewer couid be sent against 
the line, the whistle blew and a great 
game was ended. "Sailor" Johnson 
distinguished himself during the last 
half especially by his excellent work on 
defense. 

The lineup and score : 



HOLY CROSS 

McCabe. le 
Ostergren. It 
Davitt, Pickett, Ig 
Monahan, Collins, c 
Collins, Quinn, rg 
Tobin. Cahill, rt 
Meltvier. re 
Whalen, qb 
Carnnody Voik. Ihb 
Colleary, rhb 
Gibson, fb 



M. A. c. 

re, Larsen 

rt. Hayden. WiJllams 

rg. Walker 

c, Johnson 

Ig, Baker 

It, Samson 

le, Edgerton 

qb. Smith 

rhb, Moreau, Darling 

Ihb, Brewer 

fb, Hubert 



Scort— HolyCrosa6. M. A.C.O. Touch- 
down — Colleary. Goal from touchdown — 
Gibson. Referee— Hurley o( Harvard. 
Field judge— Cochran of Bates. Umpire — 
Butler. Linesman — Murphy. Timer — 
Cochran. Time — 1 1-minute quarters. 



PHI KAPPA PHI DAY 

(Continued from r»zt t .] 



in recognition of their importance. 
Next they were founded by govern- 
ments and education was given to those 
who would but apply. In this country, 
however, we have no record of such 
bands of young men. But about 
1776 there sprang into being the first 
organization of scholars in America, 
the Phi Beta Kappa society. Founded 
at William and Mary college in Vir- 
ginia, it quickly spread to other col- 
leges until to-day its influence is felt 
throughout the land. Incidentally, It 
was the first Greek letter society, al- 
though the present name is a nick- 
name. 

Professor Olds then went on to show 
in what esteem scholarship has been 
held all through the ages, and of the 
profound respect abroad for the high 
scholar. The proudest moment of 



UP-TO-DATE 



+ COLLEGE FOOTWEAR* 



Elite Shoes, 
Swell Shod Shoes, 
Pumps the fit, - 



$^.$0 to $5.00 

$5.00 atid ^6.00 

$4.00 



EXPERT REPAIRING 



PAGE'S Shoe Store, 



BETWEEN THE BANKS 



The College Signal, Tuesday. October 24, 1911. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass, 



j»E. N. PARISEAU,^ 

Barber j^^ Shop 

RAZORS HONED 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amher»t. Nlmam, 



THE 



E. E. MILLETT TiiE WORTHY. I Hoover & Smith Co. 



Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandoiin, and Guitar Strings 

I.K.NS (iKINUINO 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



Kodaks, 

Eastman Films, 

Victor Talking 
Machines, 

Victor Becords, 

Fountain 
Pens, 

Leather Goods. 



DEUEIL'S 



DRUG STORE 



FRANK H. DANFORTH, Mgr. 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



Amherst Corner In Rathskellar. 



MILLS, 

PHOTOGI^APnER 

The best workmanship. 

The latest styles, 

Reasonable prices 

Lincoln Building, Amherst, Mass. 



The Prospect House 

-PERRY'8- 



The place to eat after the game. 
Attractive tables and rooms. Excel- 
lent service. Catering a specialty. 



MRS. E. E. PERRY 

There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 



or 



C. R. ELDER 



O16 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 



Jewelers and Silversmiths, 



.Diamond Merchants. 



Philadelphia's Official Fraternit} Jeweler 



Gladstone's life was when he received 
his double-first at Oxford. By means 
of statistics, the speaker then showed 
that many of our impressions to- day 
about the relation of high scholarship 
to life are false. It is not true that 
high scholarship is no longer the es- 
sential part of a college education. 
In closing, Professor Olds said: I 
would be the last to underestimate the 
value of what we call our "college 
life." Athletics and student activities 
make men capable of taking the initia- 
tive. I sometimes think more of a 
man who makes an original blunder 
than of one who simply re-echoes what 
he has been told. We should, how- 
ever, always strive for promotion. This 
Is primarily an institution of learning, 
an institution that trains men for a 
vocation. Bui a vocation Is some- 
thing larger than medicine, law or 
fruit-raising. It is a calling, a call to 
higher lifs. When a man starts out 
in life he opens a debit and credit side, 
as It were. When he ales, if his 
credit side is not larger than his debit 
side, that is. If he has taken more 
than he has given to the world, then 
that man has been an obstacle. The 
real value of wealth lies in its surplus, 
and a man's surplus can always be in- 
creased by the best attempt he can 
make at nigh scnolarship. All that is 
demanded is that a man do the best he 
can, that he mak-i the best scholar out 
of himself that he can. Let it be a 
goal before you men, high scholarship. 
May It be broad and deep, and above 
all, devoted, that you may be better 
able to contribute »o manhood ai.d 
best serve the country In which you 
live. 



SPECIALISTS IN 



Fraternity Badges, 
Rings, Charms..... 

Medals College 

Rings, Charms.-. 



Fohs, Novelties, 
. Prises. Trophies 
Pins. Fobs. Seals, 



YOU WILL FIND 
A FULL LINE 
OF 



lioaiii \ Ginanilliis 



TOBAGOO 



SIGNAL COMPETITION 

The competition (or membership on 
the Signal Board has been in progress 
for three weeks, and some good 
maief.al has come out. But still, in 
the editorial aepartment, especially in 
the Sophomore and Junior classes, 
more candidates are needed to bring 
out the b-ist results. Here Is your 
chance, you who are wondering what 
you can do in college activities, to take 
part in something that is vitally con- 
nected with the college and Us aflalrs. 
Go now and hand In your name to the 
Competition Editor, and get to work! 

The standing of the men up to Fri- 
day, Oct. 20th, is as follows. This 
does not Include material passed In (or 
this Issue. 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT. 
1913. 



\ 



Kirsdibaum Qodiei 

»«0«- WAtta »MKII«» 




Sanderson 

^ Thompson 

Fail 
Announcement !! 

Our Kail and Winter Outlitting for 
students is now ready. You may 
confidently look to this store for the 
very latest fashions. 

Our Prices Never Prevent a Sale 

We want you to feel at perfect 
lilxirty to look as long and as often as 
you like without buying. 

This is the home of the Hart, 
Schafner & Marx clothes. 

Interwoven hose in all grades, 
250, 35c and «oc. 

rhoenix silk hose. 50c. 

The Arrow IJrand and H. & I. 
collars. 

Kverythinp you may need for your 
wardrobe at prices no one can under- 
sell. 



PROMINENCE 

Is given here to the fact that we take 

special care in the posing of 

subjects in order to bring 

out all the good 

features. 

Light and -shade is skilfully diffused. 

This and the excellent finish makes 

our PH()TO(;kAl'H.S masterpieces 

of reproductive art. 

SHILURE'S STUDIO. 
142 Main St., NorthaBptw 

MJa MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 

Orders Ut at the A»h«-r»t House will recel»* 
prompt attention 



Sanderson 

df Thompson 

Clotlilirs, Hittirs, Tallort 

COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Mikirt 

If 



& OOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts • 
Specialty 



Toefil Mientka, 

Boot and Shoe Repairing. 



Done while you wait. 



At»^lior«st, 



A(IOA«« 



AT 



PHOTOGRAPHIC GOODS. 

H. W. Allen 4.91, F. D. Griggsl No matti:r whcllicr your negative is only fair— or even 
4.13. Paul S=r= 3^24, | ^^^^^ No one sees the negative. Its the print that makes 

C M Allen3.92, R. N. Demond ] or mars your work. 
1.50, E F. Parser 0.00. j CYKO PAPER 

G E. Donnell 2.90, E. F. Moore [^ elastic and responds to variations in treatment. 
1.07, Carl Bredermeier 0.00, W. H. ^ „i^,p^ ^oft or brilliant prints at will and compensates for 
"»^f'«'^ ^•^- " defects of a badly li,i;hted negative. 

We have two new numbers of 



The College Drug Store 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT, 
1914. 

R E. Davis 7.25, E. F. Upton 
3.75, J. D. Pellett 1.00, M. D. 
Lincoln .50. 

1912. 

M. B. Saben 6.00. M. J. Clough 
3.50, H. U. Marsh .50, M. F. Sher- 
man .50. 



FOLDING CAMERAS. 

Come in and let " Shorty " tell you all about them. 

HENRY ADAMS & COMPANY. 

The Rexall Store. 



*^ 



The Colltge Signal, Tuesday, October 24, 19 11. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 24, 191 1. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening; by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural Colleg^e. 



BOARD OF BDIT0B8. 

ALDEN C. BRETT. 1912. EdMor-ln-Chlaf. 

JESSE CARPENTER. JR. ,1912 M«iWflnr Editor. 
R. H. VANZWALENRURG. 13. AMitMnt Editor. 
MARSHALL C.PRATT. 1912. Competilion Editor 
ROYAL N. HALL.OWELL. 1912, Atiiletlcs. 

JOSEPH A. HARLOW, 1912. Athletic*. 

OSCAR G. ANDERSON. J 91 3, AhimnI Note*. 
SIUAS WILLIAMS. 191?, Dep«rtm«nt Note*. 

S. MILLER JORDAN 1913. Colleg* Note*. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912. Busineu Mtnaeer. 

GEORGE ZABRISKIE. 1913 Ami. Bua. Maiuger. 
ERNEST S. CLARK. JR.. 1914. Circulation. 

CHESTER E. WHEELER. 1914, Circulation. 
STUART B. FOSTER, 1914. C'leulatlon. 

Subscription $1.50 per year. Slng^le 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Albert W. Doooi. 



Kntoed M 
Pe« Offic*. 



■aeond-c<aH matter at th« AmharM 



VoL XXII. TUESDAY, OCT. 24. No. 6 



Now that the fall breezes 
bared the trees it is time the 
were busy. 



have 
rakes 



Patrons of the dormatories should 
remember that the power honse Is 
headquarters for the distribution of 
new elfctric lights and not the Chapel 
or Drill Hall ; also, the light on the 
cross-walk near the pond is intended 
to give light and not to stimulate stu- 
dent target practice. 



The repairs to the sidewalk along 

the pond to the e«st of the chapel 

have considerably Improved conditions 

In that place. The matter of concern 

to the patrons of Draper Hail now is 

whether or not they will be compelled 

to navigate through the mud at the 

head of the ravine three times a day 

for the entire winter. Something 

should be done immediately to remedy 

this condition. A temporary board 

walk would not be out of place. 



The football game with Holy Cross 
was marked by good clean playing on 
both sides. 

The copy for the last half of the 
1913 Index went to the printers, 
yesterday. 

"Sailor" Johnson has been wearing 
a broad smile, this past week. We 
wonder why. 

Roehrs, Zabriskle and Howe were 
favorably mentioned at Saturday even- 
ing's Union entertainment. Sad but 
true! 

Although defeated, the showing of 
the football team against Holy Cross 
was very good. Saturday's game 
proved that the next few teams buck- 
ing our gridiron squad will have their 
work cut out for them. 

At the last meeting of the Y.M.C.A. 
20 new members were taken In. Ex- 
tension work was considered at a 
meeting, Sunday afternoon. Mr. 
Redmond county secretary and Pro- 
fessor Waide will have charge of the 
work. 

At a class meeting, Wednesday 
afternoon, the following sophomores 
were awarded their numerals for cross- 
country: Shirley, Smith, Stevens, 
Coe and Peters. Candidates for class 
football were called for and practise 
will shortly commence. 

Magazines have recently been dis- 
appearing from the Library in a strange 
manner. Such things have no doubt 
happened before but should no 
longer continue. It might be called 
theft, but perhaps it is carelessness. 
If you want any magazine for a certain 
artice either read it in the Library or if 
not a current issue, have it charged 
to your name. There may be 30 or 
40 more wanting the same article and 
it's up to you to give the other fellow 
a square deal. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 




It's a good thing not to worry about 
your pedal apparel, its correct, style 
comfort or durability. 

Buy your shoes from 

Tlifi Shop Ms The Slyle 

•• Walk Over, " Haywood Shoes, 

*3-50, 14.00, I5.00 



E WELL'S 



Although the game Saturday may 
be somewhat discouraging when the 
score ak>ne is considered, reports 
show that such is not really the case. 
The team is undoubtedly developing 
and all that it lacks is adequate sup 
port from the student body. Every 
student who can possibly do so should 
plan to attend the game at Medford 
Saturday. Comparative results show 
that the contest will be hard, even, 
and well worth watching. Make the 
team see that the whole student body 
Is behind it. The final game of the 
season is now less than a month away, 
and the men must begin to arouse that 
old M. A. C. spirit that Is sure to win. 



COLLEGE NOTES 

J. G. Hutchinson has been elected 
manager of the 1914 football team. 

Mrs. C. A. Goessman, 71, widow 
of Dr. Charles A. Goessmann, for 
many years professor of chemistry at 
M. A. C, died of heart failure Oct. 
13th. 



LIBRARY TALK 

C. R. Green, the Librarian, spoke 
to the freshman class Wednesday 
morning. His theme "The Library 
and How to Use It" is matter worth 
consideration by every student. He 
sooke of "getting together" as one of 
the necessary requisites for co-opera- 
tion between the librarian and the stu- 
dent. The better the understanding 
that exists between the librarian and 
the student, the better will be the 
facilities for getting the best use from 
the library. 

He spoke of the arrangement of the 
stacks and emphasized quietness and 
carefulness, in putting books and 
periodicals back where they were first 
found. 

He appealed to the gentlemanly 
qualities of conduct and honor, in pay- 
ing up fines. In this, the "people's 
university", the library, as a fund of 
solid benefits cannot be beaten. 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

Ruas 

CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New hln- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

and 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



Holies " Special, " Stetson Shoes, 

95>oo to $8.00 

REPAIRINC department 

E.M.BOLLES 

••THE SHOEMAN." 
Next to Corner Drug Store. 



Angier, '13. 



Clark, '13. 



We have a full line of Banners, I'ost 
Cards, College Songs, Seal I'apers, Foun- 
tain Pens, Candy, Tonic and Student 
Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

basement op no. collegb 



Eld ridge, '14. 



Tarbell, '14. 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty ■ 



7 Pleasant St. 

Amherst, 



Phillips Block 
Mass. 



^&rptn-ter & /^orehous^, 

PRI^TEI^S, 



No I, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Dartmouth's line on her home field 
was crossed for the first time in eight 
years, last Saturday, when Vinal of 
Williams pushed the ball over for a 
touchdown after a spectacular 20-yard 
run. 



H. E. KINSMAN, 

College Photographer 



NASH BLOCK, MAIN ST., 
AMHERST, 






MASS. 



High-grade artistic work. Perfect satisfaction guaranteed. 

Studio newly equipped with large sky light 

and special lense for large 

groups. 

All styles the latest. Fine picture framing. 



The speaker next called attention to 
the fact that since about 1870 the 
character of the emigrants has 



THE FOOTBALL SPOTLIGHT 

That game with Holy Cross on Sat- 
urday was a hard one to loose after 
such a splendid fight on the part of j changed. The more stable races of 
the Massachusetts men. Neverthe- j northern Europe have given place to 
less, in many respects a 6 to defeat | ^^ose less suited for our life from the 
at the hands of such a team as that | southern part of the same continent. 
Worcester aggregation, is better than I It is our duty to help these peoples fit 
a victory. Holy Cross broke into the | Into our social and economic life with 
limelight early In the season when 'he least possible, friction, 
she withstood the rushes of the Cnm- j Mr. Ringe then asked, -What have 
son and the Ells holding these peerless college men done." In answering 



elevens to very low scores. There- 
fore, the resuhs of Saturday's game 
are not surprising in that the team was 
beaten but rather because the men 
gave such a good account of them- 
selves. 

There is little doubt today but that 
the team has "come back." The 
coaches are now bf'ginning to realize 
some of the results of their labors. 
The experimental stage is past and big 
things are expected m the future 
games. Next Saturday Massachusetts 
will line up for the annual game with 
Tufts at Medford. In past years this 
game has awakened more than pass- 
ing interest, especially from the 
alumni. There are 200 or more 
M. A C. graduates in and about Bos- 
ton who make It a practice to attend 
at least this game each year. Last 
season, the loyal "Aggie" men made 
more noise and cheered more lustily 
than the whole Tufts student body. 
This year the same thing ought to be 
true. There Is a small majoritv of 
students now attending the college 
who come from the vicinity of the 
Hub. Here Is just the opportunity for 
a week-end visit at home and at the 
same time a chance to take in the 
game. Then there are other numer- 
ous attractions, the princ^al one being 
the New England Industrial exhibition 
including the annual fruit Show and" 
other features. Already a large 
number of men are planning to accom- 
pany the team. 

Last year Tufts won on a safety, 
the final score being 7 to 5. Next 
Saturday the team is going to reverse 



this question, he stated that during the 
past three years the work has been 
organized and put on a firm, practical 
foundation. Last year New York 
city alone furnished 165 men who gave 
from one to three nights a week. The 
strongest and best men all over the 
country are being drawn Into the move- 
ment. Teaching English, explaining 
our laws, boys clubs. In fact any means 
of uplift is undertaken. "The hand 
of brotherhood" Is given to all. He 
then spoke of the opportunities m this 
line in our Immediate vicinity. 

Besides telling of the general good 
that a man would have the satisfaction 
oi doing, Mr. Ringe showed very 
clearly the personal gain from engag- 
ing in this work. A knowledge of how 
to handle men and especially the work 
Ing classes is gained. This is neces- 
sary for the success of college men. 
Many striking illustrations were given. 

As a fitting conclusion, nearly every- 
one present signified their desire to en- 
gage in the work if the opportunity 
trffered. 



Hills '12, 
Larsen 12, 



First cast, 
the figures at least. It is the duty of v/jide '12 

every man who can so arrange it. Gray '12. 

freshmen Included, to get down to 

Medford on Saturday and cheer the 

team on to victory. Meanwhile, * ! I^'f*?,', '^' 

little cheering from the side lines dur- 1 Hyi^nd '13 

Ing afternoon practice would help to , y^Hen '13, 

Inject the proper spirit Into the men. Reed '14, 



DRAMATICS 

With the first production of "What 
Happened to Jones," only a month 
or so ahead, the Dramatic society has 
nearly picked its cast. Rehearsals 
are being held under the direction of 
Mr. and Mrs. Mills, who so ably 
coached last year's production. The 
first tryouts were held two weeks ago, 
when the judges. Professor Lewis and 
Instructors Wattles and Widger 
decided upon the following men for 
first and second cast : 

Second cast. 

Wheeler '14, 



Brown '14, 
Curtis '13. 
Draper '15, 
Glbbs'15, 



If. K. C> A. 

The speaker at Thursday's Y. M. 
C. A. was Mr. C. E. Ringe of Boston, 
representing the Industrial Service 
Bureau of the Y. M. C. A. He 



Whidden 14, 
Moore *I5. 
Lewis "15. 



Harvard is to have a new university 

library. It is to be built piece by piece 

on the site of the present structure, 
spoke of the campaign in which the ^^^ ^^„ ^^^^^ ,j ^^p,^^^^ j^^ 

association is engaged In behalf of em- ^^^ j^^,,^,^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^^^ larger. 
Igrants. As a foundation for this ^^^ ^^„ ^^^ ^^^ g^^^,.^„ ^^ ^ 

campaign, eleven paid secretaries work ^^ ^^^^^ ^,„ ^^^, $2,000,000, 

among the emigrants at the different ^.^^ 5500,000 as a permanent fund. 
European ports while nine secretaries m.m^^^m-m - 

are stationed at ports of entry in this Columbia University Is this year 
country. Thus our new citizens are the largest college in the world with a 
aided and put on friendly terms with total attendance of 7468. Last year 
the Y. M. C. A. at the outset. I the University of Berlin stood first. 



EVERY STUDENT 

Taking agricultural chemistry should kcej) up with 
present developments as well as grounding himself in 
principles. We wish every student would send us a 
postal card request for Mr. Bowker's latest circular 



treating of 



AVAILABLE SULPHUR 
IN ACID PHOSPHATE 

It !■< A "Live" Subject. The Circular Is Free 
" Stuify the Plunt JuwU rroblem " 

RAWIf I?P Fertilizer Company 

lj\j II IVDll 43 Chatham St. Boston 




. A. SHEPARD. 

MEN'S STORE 



Kuppenheimcr's 
Fine Clothes 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOM TAIIORING A SPECIALTY 

Thoma.s Hrmknwav, 'it, M. A. C. Representative 




We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



PARKS. 

FLORIST, 

Flowers for all occcasions. 

Mail or telephone orders given 
prompt attention. 

239 Main St., Northampton 



DUDLEY 

OUrriTTKR IN 

Fine Athletic Goods 

FOR EVERY SPORT 




"The Best In Tnc World' 
Write for cataloge. 



diaries H. Duty 

HANOVKR, - • N. H. 

Agent, UAZEN '14 



I^he CoUcfc Signal, Tuesday, October 24, 1911. 



The College Signal. Tuesday, October 24. »9"' 




GOODS FOR MEN. 



C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 



^ English and Scotch Woolens. 

TH£ BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 



Highest Grade Roses 

We are offering to our local patrons, selection from our large 
stock of finest Roses, espt-cially jjrown for the Nkw York and Boston 

Fi.OWKR M.AKKKrS. 

THE MONTGOMERY CO., Inc., 

HADl_tY, MASS. 

TELEPHONES. 

Amht-mt. 196-R. 
Northampton. 660. 




r wv 



ru^ 



Bicycles. Gun.s. Typewriters, etc., for rent. 
Rare bargains now on our floor. New and 
second hand Indians. 



Typewriters for sale and for rent. If you 
already have a typewriter I will accept it as 
part payment on a new one or furnish you a 
new Ribbon and put it in first class shape. 

If you have lost a key or need a new 
lock ft! vour door or trunk, romc right 
along. VVe are waiting for you. 

Burn the midnight electricity. It is 
more cleanly than oil. We have a fine line 
of Fle.KO Lamps and odd electric fittings. 
Study would be a pleasure instead of a 
drud^rerv if vou use one of these Flexo 
Lamps. 
R^^^^s of Automobiles.^rc^cTes, Cameras, Desks, Elec- 
tric Fixtures, Guns and so on to the end of the alphabet. 

•' Any old thing except ^^"^brellas/^ ^ 

Guaranteed Tennis, Football, 
H o c k e V Goods. Guns and 
Ammunition. 




GERMAN 

PROFESSOR ASHLEY OUTLINES THE WORK 
OF THE DEPARTMENT. 

With additional help in the teaching 
of German the department feels this 
! year better able to deai with the Indi- 
jvidual training of the student than 
hitherto. Small classes in a modern 
language are not only preferable 
but are a necessity, when we con- 
sider individual work, the importance 
of which need n-»t here be emphasized. 
For the past three years the depart- 
ment has been aiming at that arrange- 
ment of it.s courses which might make 
the progran of the four years' work the 
most effective and efficient, and It Is 
hoped we have now reached the posi- 
tion where we may give any student 
in German that training which may be 
of the most value to him. 

Having an entrance requirement of 
two years, we are able to take some 
students who have had good training 
into courses which ain> to enable the 
student not merely to acquire a read- 
ing knowitdge, but eventually to 
handle the language with some ea.<e 
and correctness. For this reason an 
effort is being made to introduce the 
spoken German as the medium of 
thought into the class-room work as 
early as possible, so that the later 
elective courses In literature and con- 
versation may be conducted entirely 
in the language being studied. While 
wo. in our restricted time, can not 
hope to turn out fluent conversational- 
ists, yet we do hope to enable the 
amblilcus student to express himself 
satisfactorily and to understand and 
fellow a lecture in German with ease. 
The lecture given here last spring by 
PrJ. J. E. B.Jonas of Brown Uni- 
versity was encouraging In this respect. 
We Intend to continue with such lec- 
tures in the future. Practice In writ- 
ing is given to all, from translation of 
simple prose to the rewriting of lec- 
tures and stories read aloud to the 
class, who take notes and then rewrite. 
Themes of six pages of fairly correct 
German are often submitted. 

To many the call of the "Practl 
cal" Is more alluring, and for such 
the course In Scientific Reading is 
designed. This may include reading 
in any of the sciences ; so soon as the 
student Is able, he may select books 
on any subject whatever, in which he 
is given individual work In translation. 
Although the college is technical in 
its aim, yet we are glad to have men 
who are not restricted in their aims 
and ambitions for merely that which Is 
practical and lucrative, but who wish 
to mingle with the outside world, as 
well equipped in cultural and broad 
I training as the graduate of the so- 
j called acadeinic Institution. The lat- 
1 ter turns out good men in the scl- 
I ences ; Why should we not do just as 
much in those subjects which may not 
I be recognized as our specialty? For 
such men we are offering our most 
advanced courses, conducted entirely 
in German. In these courses we aim 



M. D. OILMAN. C. A. MOrFET. 

TELEPHONE 1079-3. 

GILMAN and M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 

CONFECTIONERY. 

tOTIoSn Maim Stkbbt. 

Worcester. Mass. 



FOR FARMS 1 

Big. Little (»r Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building Lots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity. 

Inquire 

W R BROWN 

Savings Bank Bl'k, 

Amherst, Ma»«. 

E.B DICKINSON D.D.S. 

Williams Block, Amherst. Mass. 

OfKK K llfmii* 



Wright &Ditson 



Headquarters 
tor 



Athletic Supplies 



Lioll 
H..<»krl R.tll 
Foot Hall 
Hi'ckfv 
Track and 
Field Sport' 



l«. ■. raT. orr 



r.^rn'V;.L.. College StoileBts fL 
and Athletes who %U'St^ 
want the real, so- ^jji. 
perior articles for 
the laiious sports, 
should insist vpon 
those bearing the 
Wright & Dltsoi 
Trade Merit 



Catalogue Free 

Wright & Ditson 

334 Washington St. 
Boston 

NeiYor* ^ . Chicago 

San Francisco ^ ^^^ 
Profldeece Cambridge 



AMHERST 

Chp Laundry 

///£/i-Gra(/c Co/lioe Work 
LAUNDRY 



I Shirts. 
I Ci»l)ars, 
I Cuffs, - 

Plain wash, 

Same, r<»ugh dry, 



ID 15c 
2C 

ac 

40c per (loz. 
25c per doz. 



Ralph R. Parker, agent, C. S. C. House. 

85 Pleasant St. 

p>ancis S. Madison, agent for 1915 and 

sliort course, Vet. l.ab. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Fred S. Merrill, agent, C S. C. House, 

85 Pleasant St. 
Put full name and address on laundry 



BUS 1 

NIUXIS. 




CojE Vallej St. Rj. Liiiiis 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTIIAENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanlhemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



to present to the student by lectures 

the history and development of the 
German language from Gothic times 
to the modern peiiod; to make 
him acquainted with German life and • 
customs; to present in class-room and 
outside reading some of the best Ger- 
man productions, from the Nibflun- 
genlied to "Faust." novels of Schef- 
fel and Sudermann, etc.. and works of 
the more modern school. 

Atmosphere in the class-room 
counts for much, and the student of 
any language needs a class-room where 
he may find some stimulus to his in- 
terest along the line of whatever that 
language may represent that is broad- 
ening and cultural. With no class- 
room lawfully ours, the department 
has felt It impossible to furnish that 
atmosphere which might conduce 
towards making German and Germany 
more vital as well as interesting. We 
have at last made a small begmnl' g 
In the shape of a few pictures of Ger- 
man scenes, and hope for better 
things in the future. 

For some time we have been plan- 
ning a German Club which might be a 
centre of interest in work along this 
line. The time seems now ripe for 
such an enterprise, and we hope to 
make a beginnir.g soon. We hope, 
furthermore, to begin to make for the 
department a collection of lantern 
slides which may be used at such 
meetings or regular lectures which 
may give the student definite ideas 
regarding modern Germany, and its 
things of interest, such as Its people, 
cities, buildings, scenery, etc., a 
very essential feature in the study of 
any language. In our future plans we 
feel the truth of Schiller's words : 
Die Welt wird alt und wird wieder jung. 
Doch der Mensch hofft immer VertestruHg. 
Edgar A. Ashley. 




THE 
SMOOTHEST 



EVERY heshman wants to start right. 
Put him next to Velvet— the college 

' smoke. It's the real, time-matured 
tobacco with a smooth, 

delightful flavor a |BL\ / ^ 

taste that never palls ^PO I ( 
on you — doesn't bum ^ '^ 

bot. 

Velve* u Hipeib tobacco — 
aged two yews — an ideal 
•moke. Today — tomonow 
— whenever you do tmoke 
it, thai day will bring you 
• aew version oi pipe pleas- 
■M. You will become a 
Velvetaiian. Just keep it 
ia Bifid. At all dealets. 

SPAULDING k MERRICK 
CHICACO 




WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

J7 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

ENTOMOLOGY. 

J. H. de la Torre Bueno, a cele- 
brated specialist on Hemlptera, visited 
the college last week and examined 
the collections. 

An excellent book on Practical 
Photo-Murography by J. Edwin Barn- 
ard has just been added to the depart- 
ment library. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



'98. — H. D. Hemenway Is sending 
out advertisements of special advanced 
classes in dancing. Many old friends 
who knew of Dan's college activities 
in the Methodist church will think that 
he is still learning??? 



ICE CREAM, 



\ Closed only from t A. M. to 4 A.M. 



STEAM FITTING. Telephone J^-*. 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PLUMBERS. 

Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows. 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 
( Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MASS 




M 



Orchards Pay Better Than Gold MInea When Pertlllzed With 

GENUINE THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER! 



The Mawachusetts SUte Boird of ARriculture Offered a Prize for the Most I'rofitatJe Acre of 
yL isi iehtt*ett-» Orchards. This Contest Has Recently C lo^ed. and the 

PRIZE IS WON BY THK DRKW-MUNSON PRUIT CO.. «f l.lttteton. MaM. 

Their Prixe Winning Acre of Baldwin Apples 

OAVB TMEM A TOTAL RETURN OF I7I5.70-THE NET PROFIT WA« »5I9.»» 



^giVll^l?H!.\^'?^I^'lfiEllOHE THimiis phosphate pflwoH.^oL.'iv%u^" "'• 



ACRE 



rii' K 



I ,w,n«T.-tt^r From Barnes Brothers, the Famous FruU Growers and Orchardi.ts of 
Yalesville. Conn.. Shows That Thoinai Phosphate Powder Brings a Pn/e to 
Kvery User in the Form of a Irohtable Crop : 



Thr Cok Mortimeu COM^ANV. 

Gentlemen: _, ... n 1 

In rt-tjard to Thomas Phoff>haU Pmvder. 

you will recall that we bought of you la*t ye.u 
yyttons an<J we wish to say that if gavp us moit 
excellemi results. On our i>e.ch orchard whnie 
weus^d it. tlie Iretf made <i sNfH/nljrtrwtH 
with heavy dark green foliage, the fruit uas 0/ 
txiellent color, and the keeptng qualtttes were rt- 



marknhle. ivhick was a Mr itdpantage. csijecial- 
ly when we had over 1 W cars to hanest in about 
/»'0 «r^*.t .IS we had this v«Mr. 

We never saw better .olored Baldwin Appies 
than those ue greu< vhere we applied a good 
dreeing of Thomas Phosphate PvuHter. The 
best told at retail /or |(>.oo/«r barrel. 
Yours truly. 

Barnes Brothrii>. 



THERE IS A TRUTH IN ALL THIS FOR YOIj I 

The whole story is told in the New Kdition of our Bc.klet, -Up-To-nate 
Fruit Growing," which is sent free if you mention iHKCottEGE Signal. 

The Coe-Mortimer Co.,mTorters 5 » Chamber St., N. Y. City 

We also distribute from Boston. MASS.; Bklfast. Maine. nAi.TiMoRit, 
Mn.; Phila.. Pa.; Norfolk. Va.; Savannah. Ga.; Charlston. S. C. 



/,>,, 



*tht CoUece Signal, tuesday, October 24, i^it. 



PI. J. Laporle, Idc. 



Proprietors of 



floro-my-HOBSE 



Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 



Tel. 183. 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 

J. W. T. DAVIS. 

/"'ine Repairing a Specialty 
Custom Work 



Holland's Block. 



i'huenix Row 



Atliletic Outfitters 

Complete line 0/ 

Foot. Bali, Base Ball 

Track and 

Hockey Supplies 

SWEATERS AND 

SWEATER JACKETS 



The M. A. C. Agent is Thoujas 
Hemenway, 1912. Kindly refer all 
orders to him. 



WM. READ & SONS 

HOSTON, MASS. 



DON 



Forget that for your Mettawampe 
Trek and for your hunting this 
fall, you want a heavy sub- 
stantial boot or a moc- 
casin cruiser. 

WOOLLEY '14 

Agent for (). 11. F{ass \ Co., Maine. 



BOYDEN'S 

Restaurant and Bakery 

Catering 
a Specialty 

196-200 Main St., Northanptoi, Mass. 



HE 



Massachusetts Agricultural Collese 

Forty-fifth year has opened with the registration 
of four year men aggregating 4X1 ; to date of Sep- 
tember 23. The distribution by classes is as follows : 



Seniors, - 


- 84 


Juniors, 


. - 98 


Sophomores, - 


- 125 


Freshmen, - 


-164 



Corresponding registration for other years has 
been : 



1906 
1901 
1896 

Send for a catalog. 



219 

»34 
81 



Allen Bros. 



Contractors & Builders. 



Painting, 



Electrical Work. 



KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

N neteen Hundred Twelve Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Thirteen Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club. 

Dramatic Society. 

Debating Society. 

Public Speaking Council, 



H. C. Walker, President 

Geo. H. Chapman, Secretary 

C. C. Pearson, N4anager 

R. J. Borden. Manager 

R. T. Beers, Manager 

H H. Wood, Manager 

S. M. Jordan, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

O. G. Anderson, Manager 

F. S. Madison, Presiaent 

L. S. Caldwell. President 

J. D. French, Manager 

W. J. Weaver. President 

A. F. McDougall, President 

W. J. Birdsall, President 

J. M. Heald. President 

T. J. Moreau, President 



U^hen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



Amherst, flass. 

F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 



THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CI-EANSiNG. 

PRESSBNO, 

REPAIRING. 

Qulrkrut Jservlce, ll^st Work, Luwvat Price 

All woik carefully done. Work called for and 
delivered, iients' overcoats, suits, pants and 
coats, todies' tine linen suit* a specialty. 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Kear Nash Bl'k, Amherst. 



Tel. No. 342-4 



CARS 



I. XI. IvA-KKOVIT^ 

Telephone Connection 

TAILOR AND PRESSER 

Fall and Winter Suits 

Chevrons and Stripes 

Put on Military Suits 

Full Dress Suits to Rent 

Gents' Furnishings 



Leave AQUIE COLLEQE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST lor AQQIE COL- 
LEQE at 7 and J7 mim. past each 
HOUR. 

SpccM Car* at RcaMtnabla Rata* 



Jacob Rt;ed'.s Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UN IFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of " Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND SI. RY. CO 



THE NEW ENGLAND NEWSPAPER 

All the news and the Truth 
about it, in the :: :: 

Springfield Republicaii 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 
News fully reported. 

BEST SPORTING PAGES 

The Weekly Republican will be sent 

free for one month to anyone 

wishing to try it. 

Daily, $8. Sunday, $J. iVeekty, $1. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNA 



T 



Vol. XXII. 



M ASSACH U SEITTS AGRICULT URAL- 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 31, 191 1- 



^j^^j^^Tli^T^^RT ! CROSSCOUNTRY RUN ' PROF. GEO. M. HARPER ; BEATEN BY FlEl 



Large Squad Turns Out at First Call. Tufts Defeated 35-ao. 
Training Plans. ! Individual Winner, 



R. W. Atwater 
Time 35 m. 



The first call for candidates for the 



The M. A. C. cross county team 



hockey team was issued Monday ; defeated Tufts Saturday, by superior 



morning after chapel by Captain Peck 
ham. A squad consisting of last 
year's team and ten others reported. 
Captain Peckham outlined a plan for 
training, which consists mainly of 
taking daily runs. This exercise will 
strengthen the men's wind. one point In 
which they were weak last year and 
which this year should be remedied as a 
number of the games are scheduled to 
be on large size drinks. He also empha- 
sized smoking, this must be stopped 
by all candidates. The men will start 
training this week and probably a week 
later indoor practice will be held In 
the Drill Hail. 

Manager Wood '12 has prepared 
an excellent schedule, one that Is a 
credit to the team, it will be pub- 
lished shortly. A new rink has also 
been planned. It will be larger than 
the old one and of better construction. 
The following men reoorted: 
1912— Captain Peckham, Ackerman, 

Sanctuary, Walker. 
19l3^Eilis, Little, Molr. 
1914_Jones, Hutchinson, Wooley, 

Needham, Hefron. 
1915— Bartly. Banister, Haskins, 
McDonald. 

Now that hockey has become one 
of the leading sports, there is no 
reason why the squad should not be 
larger. •'Come out fellows." 



STOCKBRIDGE CLUB 

The Stockbridge club met last Tues- 
day evening in the public speaking 
room, South College. The speakers 
of the evening were Brett and Har- 
low '12 who gave an interesting and 
amusing account of their vacation trip 
to the Wanatchee valley in Washing- 
ton. Professor Haskell spoke of the 
New England corn judgmg contest, 
soon to be held in Maine and the prop- 
osition of sending a team was dis- 
cussed. Twenty-five new members 
were voted in at this meeting. 



team work, the score being 35-20 
The weather conditions were fine, 
the runners being aided greatly by a 
slight but cooling wind. The con- 
test was run over the six and one-half 
course from Sunderland to the college 
crosswalk. All were well bnnched 
until the Plum Trees was reached, 
wh-in the fast pac-i began to tell on 
the runners. At this point, Southwick 
and Young were at least 20 yards in 
the lead of Atwater and Caldwell who 
were running abreast. 

The fast pace evidently told on 
Young and Southwick as they were 
obligsd to fall behind allowing Cald- 
well and Atwater to take the lead. 
The two latter ran side by side 
throughout the whole contest till the 
Experiment Station was reached, then 
Atwater of Tufts gradually drew away 
from "Dave" Caldwell and crossed 
the tape 10 feet in advance of him. 
Then followed closely the other four 
M. A. C. men, Southwick. Young, 
Tower ana Shayior. I he reimliilng 
Tufts runners followed each other at 
minute intervals. 

The officials In coarge of the event 
were S. Grossman, starter; Beers 
and Larabee, timers; Greenough of 
Tufts, Dickinson ai.a Chapman of 
M. A. C. Judges. 

The men finished in the following 
order: R. W. Atwater, Tufts; Cald- 
well, Southwick, Young. Tower. Shay- 
lor of M. A. C; H. A. Atwater, 
Phalen. Prescott and Fairbanks, 
of Tutts. Score— M. A. C. 35; 
Tufts 20. Time, 35 minutes flat. 



Addresses the Wednesday Assembly. 
His Subject "The Parmer. 

Professor George M. Harper of 
Princeton University was the speaker 
at the Wednesday Assembly. This 
was his first appearance at M. A. C. 
His subject was -'The Farmer," and 
he presented it from an interesting and 
rather unusual viewpoint. He an 
nounced a text, in a passag*; from 
Virgil: "How blessed beyond meas- 
ure is thefarmer, could he only know," 
for he said that he believed a preacher 
had more advantage in talking from a 
text than from a subject. 

His speech in part : "The farmer Is 
a fortunate man. Even the unsuccess- 
farmer Is not so unfortunate as the 
toiler in workshop and factory, for he 
is never obliged to work for a long 
while Indoors. A farmer, however, 
no longer needs to be told that he Is 
fortunate, for he must already have 
realized that much himself. 

"The farmers are the possessors of 
the earth. They possess U because 
they are near to it and In Intimate 
relation to all its changes. They owe 
It much more truly than because they 
hold the mere property right. Words- 
worth, when he wrote his best poems, 
possessed but little land legally, yet we 
call the district where he lived Words- 
worth's land ! 

"To any who know both town and 
city, the country must always seem the 
best. If the farmer realized all his 
advantages, he would be content. His 
happiness depends, not on his pros- 
perity, but on his condition of life. 1 
have lived on the farm and 1 do not 
hesitate to say that the farmer has 
more real leisure, more time to him- 



Kicked by Adams of Tuf 
Score 6-0. 



..'•S 



nal 



Last Siiurdiy the ••Aggie" football 
team went down to Medford 
confident of a secoi d victory; but 
two drop kicks were ei.ough to give 
Tufts the winning score 6-0. The day 
was faultless for a football game and a 
very large aggregation of "Aggie" sup- 
porters were present including many 
aluml, undergraduates and their lady 
friends. During the third period our 
team certainly showed their old time 
form and seriously threatened Tuft's 
line. Gaining, for the most part, on 
straight line bucks, our backs twice 
carried the ball down the length of the 
field. In the first part of this period 
M. A. C. had the ball on Tuft's 8-yard 
and there lost It on downs. Adams of 
Tufts then punted and the ball was 
again rushed down until on Tufts' 20- 
yard line, here Brewer tried a drop 
kick but failed as the ball went wide. 
Not withstanding that Brewer had been 
on the sick list ali the week he playea 
the entire game in old time form and 
was very conspicuous as the best dis- 
tance gainer, failing only once to 
make his distance. Samson and 
Hubert were in the lime light for the 
most part of the game making hard 
and sure tackles, after getting their 
man back 01 the line for a loss. Smith 
started me game at quarter and dia 
some good work but failed to take 
advantage of Tufts' weak places and 
was replaced by Gore in the second 
quarter. The forward pass was pulled 
off successfully twice by the "Aggies" 
but the Tufts eleven were unable to 
work It properly. "Cap" and Hayden 
were equally effective in the line, open- 



self, and greater peace of mlr.d than mg good holes there through which the 
the' city man. As this Is so today It backfleld were able lo make good gains. 



MAKE-UP OF THE MANDOLIN 
CLUB. 

The provisional make-upof the Man- 
dolin Club Is as follows 



THE WHIST SMOKER 

Next Saturday evening will come 
the first of the Social Union's whist 
smoke's. Throughout the fall and 
winter season the monotony of too 
many professional entertainers is 
avoided by an occasional affair of this 
sort. It is essentially a "get-ac- 
quainted" gathering where good fel- 
lowship will reign and formality be 
"under a barrel." Everybody out! 



probably was so In the past. Shepards 
were the first astronomers because 
they had time to observe. 

"Do not Imagine that the farmer's 



Nissen was able to to make good gains 
through the line, but did not seem 
capable of holding the ball. Although 
this was Williams' first game this year 



life is monotomous. He lives with he showed good form, and with proper 
nature, the uncertain and ever-chang- coaching will doubtless make a good 
ing. To him. even, who knows her team mate with Brewer. 



1913 INDEX 

. It is not too late to place your order 

First Mandolins: Jordan '13 leader, 1 for a de luxeedition of the 1913 Index. 



bent, she Is never twice alike. Ills 
the farmer's business to learn from 
nature and copy her. He Is her son. 
One other son she has, the poet. Both 
find their true reward only by following 
and obeying her." 

Professor Harper spoke further 
about the farmer's library. "The soil 



For the Medford eleven Adams was 
the most conspicuous player; through- 
out the game his punting and end runs 
were features and he proved a hard 
man to tackle ; he made the greater 
part of Tufts' gains. Mitchell also 
gained good ground, he succeeded in 
getting away for two 40-yard runs and 



H, 



H. White '15, A. 
Brown, 14, Al- 



Mahan '15, 
Johnson '15. 

Second Mandolins 
len '14, Griggs '15. 

Volin : French 
Ncolett '14. 

Piano: J. O. Hutchinson. 



3, Cello: T. A. 



f or a deluxe edition of the ivi J /«a*jr. ^^^^^ ^^ the farmer may always I doubtless would have crossed our line 

A depotlt of only $1.00 is asked No eoodreading. He should ' both times if it had not been for the 



orders will be accepted after Nov. 5. 
The attention of fraternity offclals and 
of any others contemplating the pur- 
chase of the volume, Is called to the 
above time limit. See O. G. Ander- 
son Immediately. 



be filled with good reading. He should ' both times If it had not been for the 
have a library composed of books of sure hard tackling of Gore, 
literature, biography, travels and Most of the gains made by either 
science. He should have on his book , team was through the line. The 
shelves a copy of Virgil and volumes \ Tufts eleven averaged about seven 
-I pounds lighter than ours, they were 

[Continu«dMPaffa2] I 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 31, 191 1. 



The College Signal. Tucaday. October 3». '9"- 




faster on their feet, followed the ball 
well and made their tackles hard. 

In the first period things seenried to 
be all for Tufts, Walker kicked off to 
Bernett, Walker gained 10 yards 
through the line and Adams then 
kicked to Brewer for a a fair catch. 
Smith made a good gain around the 
end, Brewer then dropped back and 
punted, the punt was blocked by Mer- 
rill and Harmon recovered. Adams 
then tried a forward pass which was 
intercepted by Williams, Brewtrkicked 
to Adams who ran it back 10 yards. 
On the next play Adams tried an end 
run but was nailed by '-Big Sam" for 
a loss. For the next few piays the 
bail was kicked back and forth between 
Brewer and Adams. Then Adams 
tritrd a forward pass, but as Brewer 
was Waiitiiig fur it, it was unsuccessful. 
Brcwer tnen kicked to Adams and 
Samson nailed him on the catch. On 
the next two plays Larsen touched 
Adams for a loss and Williams got 
Webber for a loss, then Adams com- 
pleted a successful forward pass to 
Merrill and the ball was downed en our 
25-yard line. Adams then got off a 
pretty drop kick from the 28-yard line 
ma<ing tne first score of the game. 
For tne remainder of the period, Walker 
kicked off to Adams who ran it back 
25 yards, he then punted to Smith, on 
the next piay, which was an onside 
kick. Brewer fumbled and Jameson of 
Tufts recovered and was downed on 
our 20-yard line by Smith. Adams 
tried another forward pass, it was 
unsuccessful and Nissen recovered on 
our 10-yard line. First period ends ; 
score Tufts 3. M. A. C. 0. In the 
sesond period Brewer punted to Adams, 
Hubert replaces Johnson and Gore 
replaces Tmlth. Hubert recovered a 
forward psss from Adams, then Brewer 
went through the line for 15 yards, 
Missen followed suit on the next piay 
but fumbled and Richardson of Tufts 
recovered. Tufts was then penalized 
5 yards for offside, Walker nailed 
Webber for a loss and Adams kicked 
to Gore who signaled for a fair catch 
but was interfered with and fumbled, 
Richardsod recoved. Angell tried an 
end run but "Big Sam" got him for 
a loss, then Adams drop-kicked another 
goal from the 43-yard line. In the 
remaining part of the period a number 
of penalties were measured out, Tufts 
being offside twice and getting 1 5 yards 
for holding while Brewer got 15 yards 
for hurdling. Schlotterbeck replaced 
Harman at right guard. Brewer and 
Nissen made good gains through the 
liee. Williams fumbied once and Hay- 
den recovered. The ball was in Tufts' 
territory all of the time. Quarter and 
first half ended with the ball on Tufts' 
10-yard line. Score, Tufts 6, M. A. 
CO. 

In third period the Aggie team had 
the Tufts aggregation on the run but 
was prevented from crossing their line 
by fumbles. Walker kicked off to 
Mitchell and Hubert made a spect- 
acular tackle getting him almost In his 



tracks, Adams tried an end run but 
Hubert prevented him from gaining. 
Adams then kicked to Gore who ran it 
back 15 yards. Brewer got off an 
onside kick, Adams punted to Brewer 
for a fair catch and Williams and Nis- 1 
sen made good first down gains through 
the center. By a series of line bucks 
the ball was carried to Tufts' 25-yard 
line and Brewer tried a drop kick, he 
failed to make the goal as it went wide. 
The ball was put into play on Tufts 25- 
yard line, Adams punted to Brewer 
who ran it back 10 yards. We were 
then penalized 25 yards. Time was 
taken for Brewer who had some little 
trouble with his football gear, but with 
the help of Johnson play was soon 
resumed. The third period ended with 
the ball in the "Aggie's" possession 
on Tufts' 30-yard line. 

In the fourth period Moreau replaced 
Nissen. On the third down Larsen 
received a forward pass from Gore but 
failed to make the required distauce 
and Tufts got the ball. Adams made 
a long end run and then kicked to Gore. 
Brewer kicked to Adams who signaled 
for a fair catch, Hubert interfered and 
was penalized 15 yards, Mitchell 
made a 40-y rd run. Gore stopping 
nim with a pretty tackle. Adams tried 
another drop kick, Brewer blocked it 
and Gore recovered. Brewer kicked 
to Adams and Edgarton made a good 
hard tackle. Tufts was unable to gain 
through the line and a series of punts 
were exchanged, Gore getting one after 
a free fumble. Then Mitchell made 
another 40-yard end run and was stop- 
ped from recovering by Gore. Sam- 
son again got Webber for a loss and 
the period ended with the ball on our 
7-yard line. 
The summary : 



UP-TO-DATE 

* COLLEGE FOOTWEAR* 



Elite Shoes, 
Swell Shod Shoes, 
Pumps the fit, - 



$3.50 to i^s.oo 

- $5.00 and $6.00 

$4.00 



EXPERT REPAIRING 



PAGE'S Shoe Store, 



BETWEEN THE BANKS 



E. E. MILLETT The Worthy. 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Ban]o, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



FRANK. H. DANFORTH, Mgr. 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



Amherst Corner In Rathskellar. 



Turrs. **• * '^• 

Jameson. Field, le re. Larsen 

Merrill It '«■ Harden 

Towsley. If rg. SchJotlerbecic. Walker 

Richardson. Peabody,c c. Johnson. Hubert 



Harmon, rg 
Bennett, rt 
Gaw. re 
Mitchell, qb 
Webber. Ihb 
Angell. rhb 
Adams, fb 
Score— Tufts 6. 



Ig, Baker 

It. Samson 

le. Edgarton 

qb Smith, Gore 

rhb. Nissen, Moreau 

Ihb. Brewer 

fb. Williams 

Coals from field- 



Adams 2. Umpire— P. F. Foley of 
Amherst. Referee—Reggie Bankart of 
Dartmouth. Field judge— Keith Pevear of 
Dartmouth. Linesman — Chick Emerson 
of Dartmouth. Time — 15-mlnute periods. 



ASSEMBLY 

(Continued from p«ga 1.] 



of Wordsworth, Burns and Whlttler. the 
greatest nature poets of their times." 
Professor Harper closed by reading 
selections from"TheCompleat Angler" 
pointing out the pleasures to be gained 
from an out-of-door life. 



The entrance of the Tufts cross- 
country team was greeted by the stu 
dents at the dining hall, Friday noon 
with a long yell. The visitors returned 
the compliment with a Tufts yell for 
Massachusetts. 



Kodaks, 

Eastman Films, 

Victor Talking 
Machines, 

Victor Becords, 

Fountain 
Pens, 

Leather Goods. 



MILLS, 

rHOTOGRlPHER 

The best workmanship, 

The latest styles. 

Reasonable prices 

Lincoln Building, Amherst, Mass. 



DEUCI-'S 

DRUG STORE 



Tlie Prospect House 



-PERRY'S 



The place to eat after the game. 
Attractive tables and rooms. Excel- 
lent service. Catering a specialty. 



MRS. EI. E. PERRY 

Ihere are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

O O A L 



or 



C. R. ELDER 




THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



^E. N. PARISEAU,^ 

Barber J^^ Shop 

RAZORS HONED 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, M«*s. 



THE 



Hoover & Smith Co, 



6i6 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 



Jewelers and Silversmiths, 



...Diamond Merchants. 



Philadelphia's Official Fraternit) Jeweler 



Y. M. C A. 

At the last meeting of the Y, M. C. 
A. Thursday evening Dr. Snow of 
Cushman spoke to the association on 
the "College man in relation to the 
rural community." 

Dr. Snow said in part; "A man is 
not going to be an asset to his com- 
munity as regards the amount of per- 
sonal means procured. Sanctified 
common sense will tell us that In order 
to get the best results we must apoly 
the best of motive power. The rural 
community as pictured is a thing of 
the past. Modern methods have rev- 
olutionized everything. Even our 
rural communities are being rapidly 
filled up with the foreign element. 
We have these things right before us 
squarely and we must either Amer- 
icanize them or "foreignize" our 
selvns. The real test of American 
citizenship is not to say, were you 
born In America? but, is America 
born In you? 

The college man can help by better- 
ing the surroundings as it increases the 
foreigner's Interest. The college man 
should try to show the boys and men the 
"real thing," not an imitation. Show 
them how the life of Christ affects 
every one and that the greatest game 
is the game of life, and the best way 
to play it Is to be manly and be a good 
winner or loser. A clean game wins 
admiration of your own conscience. 
Personality, systematic plan of Bible 
study and presenting the whole in a 
practical suggestive spirit were the 
most effective things to develop." 



S 



irachfiauSnOc^Kes. I 



■tAW01im*««» 




Sanderson 

df Thompson 

Fail 
Announcement !! 

Our Fall and Winter Ouliitting for 
students is now ready. You may 
contitlently look to this store for the 
very latest fashions. 

Our Prices Never Prevenl a Sale 

We want you t<. t,''l ;it pctf.-. t 
lil)erty to look as lonj; .nui .is <.IU-n .»s 
you like without Ijuyin^. 

This i» the home of the Hart, 
Scltafner & M.«rx clothes. 

Inlerwovtn liose in all grades, 
asc 3SC ami 50c. 

IMioenix silk hose. 50c. 

The Arrow Uiaixl ami If. vV 1. 
collars. 

Everything you may n» » cl fm muii 
wardrobe at pri<cs no one can under 
sell. 



Sanderson 

&f Thompson 

Clothiers, Hatters, Tailors 



8PEOIALI8T8 IN 

Fraternity Badges, Fobs. Noveltlea, 

Rings, Charms Priies. Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, Charma.'. 



YOU WILL FIND 
A FULL LINE 



OF- 




\ Bloanillts 



TOBAOOO 



AT- 



The College Drug Store 



CORRESPONDENCE COURSES 

The great success of the correspond- 
ence courses In Agriculture, which 
were offered by the college last year, 
has led the authorities to again offer 
these courses, which have been re- 
vised and brought up to dai'^. A new 
course, "shade tree management," 
has been added to last year's list, and 
additional courses, covering other sub- 
jects, will be added later. There are 
many people all over the state who 
desire agricultural Information, but 
who, for various reasons, find it im- 
possible to come to the college for a 
course of study In the subject in which 
they are Interested. These courses 
are designed to meet the wants of just 
such persons, and are especially 
arranged for .the farmers, dairymen, 
I stock breeders, fruit growers, market 
gardeners, floriculturists, apiarists, tree 
wardens, teachers, either in elemen 
tary schools, high schools, academies 
or normal schools, and. In fact, any 
person who desires to pursue a course 
of study pertaining to the propagation, 
care and management of the various 
plants that are grown for utility pur- 
poses and of the various classes of 
domestic animals. 

A good sized delegation of lusty- 
lunged M. A. C. rooters was present 
at the Tufts game. The alumni were 
I well represented. 



PROMINENCE 

Is given here to the fact that we take 

special care in the posing of 

subjects in order to bring 

out all the good 

features. 

Light and shade is skilfully diffused. 

This and the excellent finish makes 

our PHOTOGRAPHS masterpieces 

of reproductive art. 



COTRELL and LEONftRD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makers 
of 



SHILURES STUDIO. 

142 Mllii^tM________J|?[!'l^ 

MJB.lylAGRATH&io^ 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 

Order, left at the Amher.t HouM will receive 
prompt •ttcntloB 



_,_. & OOWNS 

To the American Col rv;cstinMi the At- 
I Untie to the Pac.hc. Clas.% Lontracts a 
Specialty 



Toefll Mientka, 

Boot and Shoe Repairing, 



iJone while ynvi wait. 



At-»»liori*t. 



:vicsa*ai. 



To introduce our New Brand of 

Cut Plug Smoking Tobacco 

•• Blaok and White " 

for a short time we will give with ea< h .or ],ox 

A Package of Pipe Cleaners 

To he had only at the 

REX ALL STORE 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 31, 1911. 



The College Signal. Tueaday. October 3'. '9" 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

ALDEN C. BRETT, 1912 EdItOf-ln-ChW. 

R. H. VANZWALENBURC. 13. A«ilst«nt Editor. 
JESSE CARPENTER. JR .1912 Maiufing Editor. 
MARSHALL C.PRATT. 1912. Competition Editor 
ROYAL N. HALLOWELL. 1912. Athletics. 

JOSEPH A. HARLOW. 1912. Athletic*. 

OSCAR G. ANDERSON, 1913. Alumni Note*. 
SILAS WILLIAMS. 1912. Dep«rtm«nt No«e». 

S. MILLER JORDAN. 1913. Coltog* NoUs. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912. BusinoM Mamger. 

GEORGE ZABRISKIE 1913 Awt. Bu«. M«n«eer. 
ERNEST S. CI ARK. JR.. 1914. Circulation. 

CHESTER E. WHEELER. 1914, CIrcuUtlon. 
STUART B. FOSTER. 1914. C'rcutation. 

Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Albert W. Dodge. 

Entered •• MCond-claM matter at the Amheril 
Office. 



Vol. XXli. TUESDAY. OCT. 31. No. 7 



Do the regulations In regard to 
bicycle riding on the sidewalks, which 
are operative In the town, apply to the 
walks on the campus as well? Judg- 
ing from the attitude which the men 
of the college who ride bicycles take, 
they do not. This condition should be 
remedied at once. With the large 
Increase in the student body the walks 
are none too large to accommodate 
the men who are obliged to walk ; and 
when the man on the bicycle comes 
whizzing along, the pedestrian has to 
step off Into the road and let him pass. 
Conditions are especially bad on the 
walk leading from the chapel to the 
street and on the cross walk and have 
reached a point wh^re sorre definite 
action is necessary. Possibly a sen- 
ate ruling on this point would not be 
out of order, but it seems that the 
men should be able to remedy this 
condition without resort to such an 
expedient. 



What became of the side-line 
cheering? At present everything in 
that direction is at a standstill. It 
was started In strongly with apparently 
good Intentions but for sometime it 
has been slowly dying out and now has 
entirely disappeared. Is it the fault 
of the men or of the cheer leaders? 
It Is safe to say that not half the men 
In the college know the songs and 
yells perfectly. The cheering so far 
this year has been far below standard. 
Every man seems to think that it Is 
his place to criticize the team and tell 
how the plays should be made rather 
to show a little college spirit and help 
the team to win. With the last game 
of the season only three weeks away, 
there should be more real spirit shown 
than is now present among the men. 
"Get together" with the team ; they 
are doing all that they can and it is up 
to you. Get Into the game, show the 
team how you feel about It so that 
when they go to Springfield on the 18th, 
they will realize that the entire student 



body Is behind them and will be 
able to "start something." 



At the risk o? being charged with 
"lack of originality" we take up once 
more the matter of lighting fn the 
dormitories. Constructive and not 
destructive criticism should be the 
aim of all who have the Interests of 
M. A. C. at heart, and It Is with that 
idea that this editorial is written. On 
Tuesday evening, the lack of adequate 
lighting In North and South was forci 
bly brought to the attention of the 
men who room in the buildings, when 
the power station failed to supply cur- 
rent for about an hour and a half. 
Both dorms were in total darkness, a 
condition that prevails every night in 
the college year from 12 o'clock on. 
The stairways are steep andn arrow, 
and in case of fire or similar emer- 
gency would at best be dangerous In 
the extreme. The college adminis- 
tration has shown in other matters that 
it has the interests of the student body 
in mind and for that reason we again 
direct attention to this matter. It 
would seem that when the office wing 
of South Is kept lighted through the 
night, it would be a comparatively 
easy matter to place the lights in the 
entries, stairways and basements of 
both buildings on a like circuit and 
thus insure the men living in the 
dorms the reasonable comfort and 
safety which is rightly theirs. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
tprith a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

[Notices for this column should l>e dropped In the 
SlOMAL Office or handed to R. H. Vanzwalenburg 
' 1 3. on or l>efore the Saturday precedlnr each laaue.] 

Tuesday, 6-45 p. m. Stockbridge Club. 
Wednesday, 1-30 p. m. Assembly, 

President K. L.Butterfleld, Mass 

Meeting. 
Thursday, 6-45 p. m. Y. M. C. A. 

In Chapel. 
Saturday, Social Union Whist Part>' 

in Drill Hall. 

Football M. A. C. vs. New 

Hampshire State at Manchester, 

N. H. 



HANDOUTS ! 

The Business Departments of The 
Signal will give a luncheon to The 
Signal competitors who report to A. 
W.Dodge '12 at 12 o'clock noon on 
Thursday. It is essential that all com- 
petitors be present. 



FOSS INVADES AMHERST 

Governor Foss and a bevy of minor 
satellites Invaded Amherst Friday 
night for a brief Democratic rally in 
the Town hall. Politics surged on the 
waves of the M. A. C. band, which 
played joyously when the Governor an- 
nounced himself as favoring the ap- 
propriation of $50,000 for the free 
scholarships at the state Institution. — 
Amherst Student. 

Joyously ? 

'07. —Walter E. Dickinson, Glen- 
wild. La. 



EWELL'5 





m 


1^^ 




^^^'"t— ^>/yfiP^ 




9T^ 


^^m^ 




"O^ 


\ l^iftMir'"? 1 




Ij^HMIBHB 



It's a good thing not to worry about 
your pedal apparel, its correct, style 
comfort or durability. 

Buy your shoes from 

TliB Shop Tliayias ^18 Style 

" Walk Over, " Haywood Shoes, 

f3-50, $4.00, I500 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 



Bolles " Special, " Stetson Shoes, 

$5.00 to $8.00 

kKPAIRlNt; DEPARTMENT 

E. M. BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Next to Corner Urug Store. 



Angier, '13. 



Clark, '13 



We have a full line of Banner*, Post 
Cards, College Songs, Seal Papers, Foun 
tain Pens, Candy, Tonic ami Student 
Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

basement OF NO ( OIXEGE 



AND 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



Eld ridge, '14. 



Tarbell, '14. 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Block 
Amherst, Mas*. 



PRIf^TEnS. 



No I, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



H. E. KINSMAN, 

College Pbotograpber 

NASH BLOCK, MAIN ST., 
AMHERST, MASS. 

High-grade artistic work. Perfect satisfaction guaranteed. 

Studio newly equipped with large sky light 

and special lense for large 

groups. 

All styles the latest. Fine picture framing. 



COLLEGE NOTES brilliant defensive work Tufts might 

Tell W Nicolet was elected captain I have crossed the -Aggie'' hne. The 
Tell W. iNicoiei w-b V tiooi^ for this week, however, 

of the 1914 track team at a recent outlooK tor 



is 



meeting. 

Aggie nlmrods were out In full 
force Saturday several of them getting 
creditable bags. 

Harlow, Brett, Wilbur. Clapp ana 
Gaskill represented M. A. C. in the 
intercollegiate contest at the New 
England Fruit show in Boston 



as bright as ever. Larsen being the 
only man who is not fit at present. 



A PROGRAM FOR RURAL NEW 
ENGLAND 

President Keryon L. Butterfield. 
addressing the industrial and educa- 
tio.nal exposition in Boston the even 



..Holyoke-s h.lls prolonged the^lng of Oct. 16. among oth.r things 
strain" That was the state of affairs. ] gave the following list of big thmgs 
Tuesday night, whe.. North and South ! that r^eed to be done for New England 
dorms were treated to two hours ci ^ ag.i ulture and country life^ He 
Egyptian darkness. After various emphasized the fact that, while tt is 
Xless" messages the power house I important that all instUutlons and 

' agencies In New England must work 
together, substantial progress will 



relented and turned on the juice 

»«Cap" Williams' "Rcughs" pUyed 
"Duke" Curran's "Touihs" in a 
sanguinary gridiron struggle en ihr 
campus Saturday morning. Tne bat- 
tle was what might be called a draw 
both teams getting the same number 
of men on the hospital list. The 
game was enjiyed by many faculty 
members. 



come only as the farmers themselves 
take held of sott^e such program as 
this. Pri-^ident Butterfield beUeves 
that they are ready to do this, and he 
proposes as an agricultural slogan for 
New England. "Rural New England 

1920." 

In general, we need 

I. To create enthusiasm for an 



EVERY STUDENT 

Taking agricultural chemistry should keep up with 

present developments as well as grounding himself in 

' principles. We wish every student would send us a 

postal card request for Mr. Bc.wker's latest circular 

treating of 

AVAILABLE SULPHUR 
IN ACID PHOSPHATE 

It Is a '•Live" SuBjEtn. Thk Circular Is Fkke 
" Study the riant Food J'tvldem " 

DAU/VUD Fertilizer Company 

UUnlVljR 43 Chatham St. Boston 



The following men were chosen for ^^^^^^^^ ^^^^ England agriculture, for 
the provisional dee club and rep.r'ed 1 ^^^ g^rlched New England country life. 



for the Mex picture. Friaay morning : 
Griggs '13 leader, Hasey. Kaulback, 
Melloon. Mahan, Campbell, Hlils, 
Pease. H. C. Walker, Gehncs Lit 
tie, R. E. Tower. Zabrlskle. Cobb, j 
Konip. Cole, Towne. Ells, Gibson. 
Whitmore, W. R. Tower, Hatfield, 
and Moore. 



THE FOOTBALL SPOTLIGHT. 

The question that greeted the foot- 
ball team on Its return from the Tufts 



an enriched New England country life, 
and for New England as a natural 
agricultural unit. 

2. To encourage every needed 1 
.association and institution which isj 
working tcr rural betterment and agrl- i 
cultural advancement in New England, 
and to assist each to gain d-finiteness, 
directness, and efficiency for its par- 
ticular task. 

3. To secure the co-operation cf 
ail the agricultural Interests of New 
England on behalf of a concerted plan, 



game Saturday nignt was, -What j a better agriculture and country Me in 
was the matter?" This is not an every rural town in the six states. 



easy question to answer but there is 
little doubt but what the defeat was 
due to the poor physical condition of 
the men. This much is certain, the 
"Aggie'" team clearly showed that It 
was far superior to Tufts but It was 
just as evident that something was 
wrong somewhere. Saturday's game 
demonstrated that the only thing that 



4. To gain for this co-operative 
movement among agricultural agen- 
cies, the active support of the com- 
mercial and industrial interests of New 

England. 

5. To develop adequate publicity 
for New England agricultural pos- 
sibilities. 

6. To educate consum.ers as to 



F. A. SHERARD. 

MEN'S STORE 

Kuppenheimcr's 
Fine Clothes 

FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 

Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOM TmiORING k SPECIUTt 

THOMAS Hemenway. '.a, M. A. C. Representative 







demonstratea inai mc um/ i.-.-.g ..— -• 

can R«p > ..an, gCng a. „» bes. pa=. N=. E"*'"!,^'™" „C an.u 



Is constant practice and the full con 
fidence of each payer in the new 
members of the team. The eleven 
put up a good fight against the Med- 
ford aggregation. In the first quarter. 



soil,— their quality, value, and use; 
and in other ways to extena the market 
for New England agricultural products. 

In particular we need 

1 . To secure an adequate inven- 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, iRd PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



luck.Ts7cha.hl„g.n,.r,in.o loot-Uory of N»w England agrlcul.ura, 
ball was surely against M. A. C. 1 resources. 

Aa'inm ,h. ,Wrd%uaM.r «h=n ,hj, 2. To d.v>3. and carnr ou, . oca 
Tf,> forwards bad b«n swept out- .lonal campaigns for .h= most . fie en. 
sldeb, the •■Aggl." .in. and wh.n a | agricultural practic. and farm manag.- 
scor. s..m.d c.r.ain.,h. „am was < rr.=nt-lh. b.st us. ol .v.ry acr. of 
renallzed" som. play w.nt wrong. N.w England soil. wbll. cons.rv,ng ^ 
just at th. psychological moment and soil resources. „.m„j, „,' 

,h. ground had to b. covered again, i 3. To i.npro.. tb. ™<^ods o 

The fourth quarter dragg.d on. neither marketing farm P™ "='=•'" °;'';''' 
team showing much W«sivene«. , all consumers may have a wder rang. 
Larsen was completely used up and ' of choice of New England gown orod- 

Hayden was In nearly the same con- "'^'^ »' » '^" P"«' ""'' "'", '^,' ^", 
dltlon. Th.r. was nothing to do but ducers may have a reasonable profit 

pun, and with Adams on the recelv '»' '"'''if "^^l,'^^"', ,,,,„„ ,h„ shall 
ing end there was no chance of any 4. To secure legis „„,„,„ 

gain. If 1. had not been for Gore's prot.ct both products and consumers. 



MdHERST BOOK STORE 



DUDLEY 

outfitter in 

Fine Athletic Goods 

FOR EVERY SPORT 



PARKS, 

FLORIST, 

Flowers for all occcasions. 

Mail or telephone orders given 

prompt attention. 

239 Main St., Northampton 




•Tme P'tsT In Tmc World" 
Write for cataloKC. 

Chafles H. Dudley 

HANOVKR, - ■ N H- 

Agent, HAZEN Ml 






muk 



The College Signal. Tuesday. October 31. 19'* 



The College Signal, Tuesday. October 31. 1911 



5«f^^^^^^%^^C5<'i^S^- 



^^^/^e^eie> 



'"yC^i^ 




COODS FOR MEN." 



C. & K. Derbys, 
Keiser Cravats, 



English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 



.^(^«v^**»^j6r^A^xVxx>N:*vjaaiftaart^a^ 



with justice to both, and that shall 
stimulate and encourage the agricul- 
tural workers. 

5. To secure better highways and 
other means of communication in the 

ral regions of New England. 

6. To improve the lural schools, 
and to inaugurate a comprehensive 
public system of agricultural education 
both for youth and for adults. 

7. To conserve and develop the 
beauty of rural Nrw England. 

8. To increase the means of 
wnolesome recreation for young and 
old, In the rural communities of New 
England. 

9. To encourage the church and 
its allies to renewed labor and more 
efficient service in all the rural towns, 

10. To encourage every wise 
endeavor for the presf-rvaiion of the 
New England rural home, the lighten- 
ing of its labors, and the widening of 
its Influence In the community as well 
as upon the lives of its members. 



Highest Grade Roses 

\Vc are ofTering to our local patron.s, selection from our large 
slock of finest Roses, especially grown for the Nkw York and Hosion 
Flower Manki i>. 

THE MONTGOMERY CO., Inc., 

MADL-EIV, MASS. 

TELEPHONES. 

Amherst. I9b-R. 
Northampton. t>bO. 



r 



M r.. OILMAN. C.A. MOKKKT. 

IKLEPHONF, 1079-3. 

GILMAN and M OFFET. 

.Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealer* 

CONFECTIONERY. 

5tf7t<»Jll Maim stkkkt. 

Worcester, Mass. 



E.B DICKINSON D.D.S. 

Williams Block, Amhekst, Mass. 

Otrtcn Hours: 
eto i«* A.. .Ni. ..««< >t«»rt r*. J\>t. 



FOR FARMS ! 

Hig, l,itlle or Mitldle Siied. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building I>ots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W R BROWN 

Savings Bank Hl'k, 

Amherst, Mas*. 



Wright &Ditson 



Headquarters' 
for 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

llic^h-Gradc Colli oe Work 
LAUNDRY 



Athletic Supplies 



Prwn'renn.s CollegB Studeflts 

Golf 
Basket Bail 

Foot B.ill 
Hockty 
Track and 
Field Sport- 



Shirts. 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry, 



10 150 

2C 
2C 

40c per (loz. 
25c per doz. 



Ralph K I'arkcr. agent, C. S. C. Mouse, 

S5 I'Icasant St. 
Francis S. Madison, agent for i-ns and 

short course. Vet. I. ah. 
DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 
Fred S Merrill, agent, C. S. C. House, 

85 I'U-asant St. 
Put full name and address on laundry 




•■•T. or» 



and Athletes who 
want the real, su- 
perior articles for 
the various sports 
should insist upon 
those bearing thi 
Wright & Ditson 
Trade Mark 

Catalogue Free 

Wright & Ditson 

334 Washington St. 
Boston 

New York Chicago 

San Francisco 
Providence Cambfldgti 



LIBRARY 

The following new bo<-ks have been 

added recently to the Library and 

may now be found on \\it shelves : 

Bailey— Manual of Gardening. 

Lyon — How to ke^p bees for profit. 

McLennan- A Manui.1 &f Practical 
Farming 

Valentine — How to keep Hens for 
Profit. 

Besant — Mediaeval London. Historical 
and Social. 

Ersklne — Leading Amtrican Novelists 
(Charles Br.wn. J. Fenimore 
Cooper, Wiilism Simms, Naihanel 
Hawthorne. HarrielBeecher Stowe, 
Bret Harte.) 

Dawson — The Great English short 
story Writers. 

Harper — Manual of Farm Animals. 

Phelps — Essays on Russian novelists. 

Stern — Studlen zur Literatur der Geg- 
enwart (2 vols.), 20 essays on Heb- 
bel, Freytag, Bodenstedt, Storm. 
Keller, Scheffel ; Fontane, Baum- 
bach, Seidel, Rossegger, Raabe, 
Wilbrandt, Wildenbreede, Suder- 
mann, Hauptmann, Ibsen. Rydbcrg, 
Snoilsky, Dandet, Tolstoi. 

Thomas— Richard Jeffries, his Life and 
Work. 

E. D. Angell: Play. 

R. B. Stern : Neighborhood Enter- 
tainments. 

G. T. Surface: The Story of Sugar. 

Pres. K. L. Butterfield: The Coun- 
try Church and the Rural 
Problem. 

D Grayson : Adventures in Friendship. 

L. O. Howard: The House-fly, the 
Diseasa Carrier. 

F. E. Schelling : English Literature 
during the Lifetime of Shakespeare. 

C. H. Curtis: Orchids for Everyone. 



another good crop of extremely fine 
fruit, and samples have been sent to 
some of the leading grocers in Boston, 
where it is expected the quinces will 
go. 

BEE-KEEPING. 

The work of tearing down the old 
Creamery building is well under way. 
Upon its foundation a new two story 
building is to be erected which will be 
used in the bee-keeping courses. The 
building is to be finished in stucco. 

This department has a display of 
bee-keeping materials and literature 
at the Industrial and Educational Ex- 
hibition at Bo.'iton. 

HORTICULTURE. 

Professor Sears and Dr. J. K. 
Shaw of the division of horticulture 
will address the Vermont Horticultural 
Society this week in Montpelier. 

ZOOLOGY -GEOLOGY. 

Through the courtesy <-.{ President 
Henry F. Osborn of the American 
Mus*:um of N-tural History of New 
York city and tnai of Dr. W. T. 
Hornsday, director of the New York 
Zoological Park, the zjological mus- 
eum becomes the recipient of valuable 
material for instruction and exhibition 
purposes in the zoological work. The 
department is very fortunate in getting 
this comparative anatomical material. 
The material is first offer«rd to the 
American Museum, but as it often 
happens that ii is not required it is 
then ofif'-red for use in various colleges. 

On Ocf. 13'h and 14th, Professor 
Gcraon a-tei ded the meetings and 
excursions of the New England geolo- 
gists, held in the vicinity of Boston. 




ASK YOUR 

STATIOINEF 

FOR 



Ward's Fountain Pens, Kine Papers 
and Envelopes, .Students' Supplies. 
Send for samples of Lngraved Invita- 
tions, Class and Fraternity Paper, 
Banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, etc. 



SAMUEL WARD CO. 

WORD'S 



5763 Franklin Street 
BOSTON 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

POMOLOGY. 

The crop of apples in the depart- 
ment is nearly harvested, and while it 
Is not as large as common, it is excel- 
lent as to quality. Even in the old 
Owen and Harlow orchards, some 
very fine fruit has been picked. The 
block of Orange quinces has given 



An I •m illrectir connerlcil with « Wholf**!* 
Ilnunc, I can 

SAVE YOU MONEY ON CLOTHES 

will Ik- pleBdoa to show Anni|il< s «nil ntylp* of 
Winter Huiti «n<l Ovprc«*i«. 

H. K. WHITK. IIM5. Iliint'a Block 
• L'pOnerildht 

If you arc getting the 

THE MOST FOR YOUR MONET 

then you are eating at the 

O. K., NFXT TO POST OFFICE 

.1. W . IKH'MK, Prop. 

Have you tried our 25-ceni Dinners.' 
If not, why not? 



If ymi wnnt tA l)e 

M>L,II> WITH THK OIKI.M 

you muHt have your clothes pregncil ami ckaoe*! 

.%t K !• .«* T K 1 N • » 
11 Amity M. Maroon Store 

Pretslng «n<I Cleaning a ip^rlalty 

MoNl liberal ticket iystein In town 




1. Valley St. l\ Lines 

FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
lural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations,violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'01. G. L. Rice is now stationed 

at London, England, as the represen- 
tative of the Western Electric 
company. 

'05.— P. T. Williams who is now 
at the Alabama State Experiment sta- 
tion, is the author of two Interesting 
bulletins which have recently been pub- 
lished by that station on "The Satuma 
Orange" and on "Peach Growing in 

Alabama." 

»07.— J. M. Summers who took 
his doctor's degree in entomology last 
June spent Saturday and Sunday at 
college. He is now connected with 
the Gypsy Moih laboratory at Meirose 

Highlands. 

»08.— James A. Hyslopls the author 
of Part VII Bulletin No. 85 of the U. 
S. Bureau of Entomology. The sub- 
ject of fhe bulletin is the "Smoky 
Crane Fly." 

1910 Notice— Address of Class 
Secretary, F. L. Thomas. Amherst. 
'10.— Address Louis C. Brown, 
Can Fernando, Hampanga. Philippine 
Islands. Lieutenant Brown n ports 
that there arc a numoer of M. A. C. 
men in the Islands. Among them 
areFiske'lO. Burrell ex-'lO, New- 
comber ex-' 10. who is a practising 
veterinarian. 

»10. H. T. Cowles has recently 

donated to the college a collection of 
Insects made last year while in Porto 
Rico. 1 

'-■.__Dr. C. W. Hooker, who has 
beeTTspending some time in Amherst, 
left lor Washington on the way to 
Porto Rico, to take up his new posi- 
Itlon as entomologist of the experiment 
station at Mayaguese. 




TTOR the man chasing the plil, uphill, 
r down hill, in the sandy ounkers. 
Velvet is mild and smcx)th and pleasing. 
Velvet -selected leaf— two y eat s in th ^ 
warehouse undergoing a change whiei 
eliminates the harshness of the Icah A 
mellowness rarely attained—a smoota- 
ness you should know all about. 
No 8ir Impossible to bite or irritate 
— one smoke as cool and sweet m 
.nother-smokeitfor54holcs.fyou 

like — always agreeable. 
At your dealers. 

SPAULDING & MERRICK. 
Chicago 





ounce tinr 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

87 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



Boston was football crazy last Sat 
urday although perhaps a little early 
m the season. The game between 
Harvard and Brown in the Stadium 
brought out a crowd of 30.000 people. 
Four thousand of them came up from 
Providence on special trains Saturday 
morning. In the evening, the big 
dailies printed sporting extras "All 
about the big game." Harvard sprung 
a big surprise on the Brunonians and 
instead of painting the town red on 
Saturday night, the big brown bear and 
his followers quietly "beat it" back 
home immedia tely after the ga me. 

The fact that Rhode Island State 
had its hands full beating the New 
Hampshire College 9 to 8 on Saturday 
seems to predict a hard game for M. 
A C When the eleven meets the 
Granite State men next Saturday^ 
George Cobb has developed a good 
team down there at Kingston and New 
Hampshire must have played the game 
some to nearly tie them. 



orchards P.y Belter Than Gold Mine. When I ertlllxeJ With 

GENUINE THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER! 

PHIZH IS WON BV THH DRUW-MUNSON FRUIT CO.. of lUtWlon. MM.. 

1 heir l'ri« Winning Acr«- ..f Baldwin Apple* 

OAVE THE.^ A TOTAL RHTURN OF S7.S.70-THH NET PROFIT WA. f.....» 



TH.s^o^KCHVRnwv^j£,,i,,HE ^^1% PHOSPHIITE POWDEli:JoL'^V:>'*KVAlg^ 

YalesTUle. <- ^ .^^^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^^^ ^^ ^ rrohtabte Crop : 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from t A. M. to 4 A. M. 



STEAM FITTING. Telephone 59-4- 

GASFITTINO, TINNIN*' I 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PL UMBER S. 

Specialty of Repairing 

Church WiNiKiws, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 
• Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MASS 



The Coe Mortimrh Comi-ahv. 

''•'"l nTR"ard to nomas Pho.pkaU Pa..d,r. 
you will recall that we Ij-mRht "f vmi la*t year 
I^ tons ,n.l w w.,h to H.iy »h^ > «»;« »*X,^ 
i^cflUnt results. On '''''^'f\TJ^^fZ^J^^i\ 
we iis.d It the trees made a sflemlta ermcin 



marknbli. which was a hig '»'''"""'''*"• "I'^iLw/ 

U when we had over itflcar, to hmrxest m ahcut 

ftw w«/*} n* we had thi* year, At,t,Ut 

Wt nex'er saw belter roiored Baldwin AP^Us 

than those werrr^' ^j!r*s.l'\,lfJ,\L The 
dreuinir of Thomas Pho^thale J jnvder. Ik* 

best sold at rttaslfor $QOo/«r barrel. 

Vour* truly, 

Ba»we»Brothre». 



THKRE IS A TRUTH IN ALL THIS FOR YOU I 

The whole ,tory is told in the New Kdition of our llo„klet. '"■>;'-''»»• 
Fruit Growing" which is ^nt free if ,o« mention TH. Lo,.t.E..K M.n a,.. 

The Coe-MortimerCo.,M'^.rcfi^i&5i Chamber St.. N.Y. City 



.^ 



1^1 ' 



: th 



8 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 31, 1911. 



m. J. Laporie, Inc. 



Proprietors of 



flOrO-LIVEBY-HOBSE 



Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 



Tel. 183. 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 

J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fttti Repairing a Sptdalty 
Custom Work 



Holland's Block. 



Phoenix Row 



Athletic Outfitters 

Complilc Hue of 

Foot. Ball, Base Ball 

Track and 

Hockey Supplies 

SWEATERS AND 

SWEATER JACKETS 



i 1' 



The M. A. C. .\gent is Thomas 
Hemenway. 1912. Kindly refer all 
orders to him. 



WM. READ & SONS 

lUJSTON, MASS. 



cold weather and snow comes you 

had better look at the 6-inch and 

9-inch Moccasin Cruiser 

WOOLLEY '14 

Winter Boots and Moccasins 
Indoor Moccasins 



BOYDEN'S 

Restaurant and Bakery 

Catering 
a Specialty 

196-200 Main St., Nortbaiptoo, Mass. 



TH 



Massacliusetts Agricultural Gollese 

Forty-fifth year has opened with the registration 
of four year men aggregating 4?! ; to date of Sep- 
tember 23. The distribution by classes is as follows : 



Seniors, - 


- 84 


Juniors, 


. - 98 


Sophomores, - 


- '25 


Freshmen, - 


-.04 



Corresponding registration for other years has 
been : 



1906 


- 


- 


219 


1901 - 


- 




■ «34 


1896 


- 


- 


81 


ilog. 









Send for a catalog. 



KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST, MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Twelve Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Thirteen Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club. 

Dramatic society. 

Debating Society, 

Public Speaking Council, 



H. C. Walker, President 

Geo. H. Chap.Tian, Secretary 

C. C. Pearson, Manager 

R. J. Borden, Manager 

R. T. Beers, Manager 

H H. Wood, Manager 

S. M. Jordan, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

O. G. Anderson, Manager 

F. S. Madison, Preslaent 

L. S. Caldwell. President 

J. D. French, Manager 

W, J. V/eaver, President 

A. F. McDougall, President 

W. J. Birdsall, President 

J. M. Heald, President 

T. J. Moreau, President 



U^hen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



I. XI. IvABWOVITSC 

Tetephone Connettion 

TASL.OR AND PRESSER 

Fall and Winter Suits 

Chevrons and Stripes 

Put on Military Suits 

Full Dress Suits to Rent 

Gents' Furnishings 



Allen Bros. 




COLLEGE sign; 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICUI-TURAL COLLEGE 




■icniltnriU 



^OL. XXII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November 7, 1911. 






Contractors 4 Builders, ■"^petition rules 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNI FORMS 

For college and milinry schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts .\gricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Painting, 



Electrical Work. 



Amherst, Hass. 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

Ail work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 



THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CL.EANSINO. 

PRESSING. 

REPAIRING. 

Uuii-kriit .vrvlw, B.-*! Work, I.MWt-Bl Frltf 

All woik carefully done. Work called for and 
delivered, (iciits' overcoats, suits, uants and 
coats, toadies' tine linen suits a specialty. 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rear Nash Bl'k. Amherst. 



Tel. No. 3^4 



CARS 



Leave AQCilH COLLEUE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AUUIE COL- 
LEUE at 7 and 37 mim. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Car* at Reu«iMibl« Rates 



AMHERSI & SUNDteiAND ST. I!Y. CO 



THE NEW ENGLAND NEWSPAPER 

All the news and the Truth 
about it, in the :: :: 

Springfield Republican 



Massachusetts .Agricultural College 
News fully reported. 

BEST SPORTING PAGES 

The Weekly Republican will be sent 

free for one month to anyone 

wishing to try it. 

Dai/y, $8. Sunday, %2. Weekly, %i. 



RIFLE OUTLOOK 



FIRST WINTER CONCERT NEW HAMPSHIRE Ou.^tASSED 



Additions Made and Several Minor De- 
tails Worked Out. 

The following additional rules were 
lenacted at the last meeting to govern 
competition In the business department. 
1 At the close of competition the 
Iboard shall elect to membership in the 
Ibuslncss department by silent ballot 
lone man from the two candidates 
Islanding highest In number of credits 
lin each of the two lower classes. 

2. In getting new advertising, credit 
Ishall be given only on the basis of the 
ladvertlsement secured and not for the 
Itlme spent In securing It ; If the can- 
Idldate Is unsuccessful no credit shall 

I be given. 

3. The editor- In-chlef may assign 
Ito candidates In the business depart- 
Iment, work which shall be credited 
laccordmg to the regular schedule. 

All men entered In the competition 
lln the editorial department are cau- 
Itioned to write their name on every 
sheet that Is handed In. Attention Is 
Icailed to the fact that the rule dealing 
■with time limits Is being strictly en- 
Iforced. 

NOTICE 

Mr. Wldger of the English depart- 
I ment Is conducting a Bible class for 
college men only every Sunday at the 
Baptist church at 12 o'clock. All 
Baptist men of the college and any 
others Interested are cordially Invited 
to become members. 



FRUIT PACKING TEAM LOSES 

, The fruit packing contest held under 
the auspices of the New England Fed- 

leratlon of Agricultural Students In 
Horticultural hall, Boston, on Oct. 
26, was won by the team representing 
University of Maine. Our team was 
unfortunate In that It lost on account 

I of accidents. 

Following are the scores made by 
each man and the totals : 
Massachusetts Agricultural College — 

BOX. BARREL. TOTAL. 

Brett, 74 94 168 

Wilbur, 87 103 190 

Harlow. 92 105 197 555 

New Hampshire State College— 



Watson, 92 108 
Davis, 90 94 
Skinner. 84 97 


200 
184 
181 566 


University of Maine — 
Jones. 89 109 
Dunlap, 93 100 
Bartlett, 78 102 


198 
193 
180 571 


The judging team consisting of 



Clapp, Gasklll, and Harlow competed 
In the judging contest on the same 
day against teams from Maine, New 
Hampshire, and Connecticut but the 
results of this contest have not yet 
been returned. 



New Men Report. Outline of Intercol- 
legiate Leai^e Contests. 

Nine new men reported at the Drill 
Hall Thursday In responco to Pres. 
McDougal's call for rifle club can- 
didates for the season of 1912. Con- 
sidering the fact that this year's team 
will have as a nucleus the veterans 
McDougal '13. Captain Lloyd '12, 
Edmlnlster '13, Wilde '12 and Mur- 
ray ' 15, there will be but five vacan- 
cies to fill. Last y-.ar the team did 
not begin practice until a week or so 
proceeding Christmas vacation, but 
this year the team will be picked be- 
fore Thanksgiving vacation and prac- 
tice will start at the Indoor range this 
week. 

Last year the college clubs formed 
one league, but the National Com- 
mittee has taken the matter In hand 
and arranged two leagues. Eastern 
and Western. The M. A. C. team 
Is to be In the Eastern league and will 
have for Its opponents such teams as 
Columbia, New Hampshire State, 
South Carolina, Georgia and Harvard, 
all of which made a creditable show- 
ing last year. As Iowa will be In the 
Western League the only chance of 
our competing with them Is In the case 
of a league championship match. 

There will be nine matches com- 
mencing shortly after the Christmas va- 
cation and extending to the first of 
March 1912. 

In order to keep a permanent hold on 
the indoor trophy which now adorns 
the trophy room, Ue team must re- 
peat Its records of the past and can 
do so only by remarkably consistent 
work, especially on the part of new 

men. 

On the out-door trophy, M. A. C. 
has three victories to her credit and 
as the tropy stands (or 12 consecu- 
tive years, the team winning the best 
out of 1 2 matches will be entitled to 

keep It. 

The range at the Drill Hall will be 
open afternoons and evenings, and for 
the entire day on Saturdays. Sergeant 
Lee will be In charge. 

The candidates to date are : — 

C. M. Streeter '13. 

R. H. Gasklll '13. 

W. C. Forbush '13. 

A. H. Russell '14. 

A. J. Torey '15. 

E. E. Moore '15. 

M. F. Sherman '15. 

C. E. Donnell '15. 

H. 0. Hyde '15. 



American Striag Quartette Here Wed- 
nesday, Nov. 15. 

On Wednesday Nov. 15th, the stu- 
dents of the college are to have the 
opportunity to enjoy a first class musi- 
cal program, as Professor Ashley has 
secured for that date the American 
String Quartette of Medfield. The 
concert will be given In Chapel at 7 30. 
The quartette Is made up as follows: 
First violin, Miss Ge'trude Marshall 

Secor^d violin. Miss Evelyn Street 

Vtola. Miss Edith Jewell 

Violoncello, Mrs Susan Lord Brandegee 
Each of the performers Is an artist 
of the highest order, three having been 
pupils of the distinguished Koeffler. 
They are assisted at the piano by Mr. 
Gebhard. The quartette gave numer- 
ous concerts last season tn Boston and 
New York receiving In these places 
the highest praise from even such 
severe critics as Philip Hale and E. 
R. Parkhurst, 

Tnls Is an opportunity which no col- 
lege man can afford to miss. In order 
to make the affair a success it Is nec- 
essary that 200 studente take tickets 
at 25 cents each ; If this number can 
not be secured, the price of the tickets 
will have to be raised to 50 cents. It 
Is hoped that this concert will be the 
first of a series of similar entertain- 
ments which will be given at intervals 
during the winter, but that will be de- 
termined by the support which the men 
give this, the first undertaking. Tick- 
ets may be secured from Brett, Muller 
and Young '12; Anderson, Lowry, 
Jonney, Jordan, Thayer and Zabrlskie, 
1913; and Damon and Jacobs, '14. 



Maroon and White Has Little Difficulty 

Winning by 8-0 Score. Brewer 

in Fine Form. 



Harvard cross country team de- 
feated Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology team 47-22. 



UNION WHIST SMOKER. 1 

A whlst-smoker under the auspices 
of the Social Union was held In the 
Drill Hall Saturday evening. From 
130 to 150 men were present and pas- 
sed an enjoyable evening playing 
bid whist. Morse '14, and Estes. '15. 
were tied for first pla-e with a score of 
54. Morse received first prize, a set 
of college seal cuff-links and scarf , 
pin, and Estes second, a Massachu- 
setts banner. "Capt." Roberts came 
m a close third with 53 points, while 
S. D. Clark '14 took as a consolation 
prize, a jug of elder. The evening 
closed with dancing, Brewer officia- 
ting at the piano, 

SCHEDULE FOR SUNDAY 
CHAPELS 

Nov. 12— Dr. M. L. Burton, presidant 
Smith college, Northampj;on. 

Nov. 19— Senator Utter of 
Island. 

Dec. 10— Dr. Samuel Eliot, Boston 



Last Saturday, at Manchester. N. 
H., the football team wen its second 
game of the season from the New 
Hampshire State college team by a 
score of 8-0 The Massachusetts 
men easily outclassed their opponents 
in all branches of the game, especially 
m team work and Interference. 
Although outclassed. New Hampshire 
'fought hard till the last whistle blew, 
; and they were loyally supported by a 
crowd of over two hundred and fifty 
, students and a band 
j The first score came In the first five 
minutes of play. After the kickoff 
Brewer and Williams rushed the ball 
to New Hampshire's 6-yard line. 
Here New Hampshire stiffened and 
held for two downs, but then was 
penalized, placing the ball on the I -yard 
line. Brewer was sent over for the 
' score. Smith failed to kick the goal 
from a dlfflcuh an^le, the ball hittUg 
one of the goal posts and bounding 
back. The other score came In the 
last quarter, when Smith dropped a 
goal from the 25 -yard line, after being 
unable to make first down. 

The game was marked by much 
punting. New Hampshire especially 
depending uppn this style of game, but 
Brewer ou'-punted Swasey by several 
yards. New Hampshire attempted 
three goals from placement, but 
^all fell short. Snilth also mlsstd 
I two drop kicks which fell shori. 
Both teams tried the forward 
pass considerably but it was generally 
I unsuccessful. New Hampshire working 
! It once for a good gain, and Massa- 
chusetts twice. There was remarka- 
bly little fumbling. both teams offending 
;once, New Hampshire recovering in 
both cases. 

Brackett was New Hampshire's star 
I man. His catching and running back 
' of punts was brilliant, but he was handi- 
capped by lack of interference. 
j Swasey and Captain Lowd were also 
I conspicuous for good work for the 
losers. On the Massachusetts sloe, 
It Is almost impossible to name any 
particular player as excelling, unless 
perhaps Brewer, who was the chief 
ground gainer and never punted in bet- 
ter form. The whole team worked 
together and put up a good snappy 

game. 

The game started with New Hamp- 
shire kicking off to Smith on the 5-yard 
Rhode line who advanced It 20 yards before 
being downed. Brewer made first 
down, but then failed to gain and 



Services will commence at 9-20 panted to Brackett who was downed in 
sharp. I 



^ 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 7, 191 1. 



The College Signal, Tueaday. November 7, 19"- 



his tracks on his 35 -yard line. New 
Hampshire ceuld not gain, and punted 
to Brewer whose signal for a fair catch 
was ignored. New Hampshire was 
penalized 15 yards, bringing the ball to 
her 45-yard line. Four rushes placed 
it on the 6-yard line, where New 
Hampshire stiffened but was penalized 
5-yards for offside play and Brewer 
was sent over for the touchdown. 
Smith failed to l(ick the goat. Score, 
M. A. C. 5, New Hampsnire 0. 

New Hampshire again kicked off to 
Smith who advanced it to the 35-yard 
line. Brewer punted to Brackett who 
was downed by Hubert. Massachu- 
setts was penalized for offside, and 
New Hampshire made first down, but 
failed to gain a second time, and 
attempted a goal from placement, 
which fell short. Smith received the 
ball and advanced it to the 15-yard 
line. The rest of the quarter consisted 
of an exchange of punts, the advantage 
being with M.A.C. The quarter closed 
with the ball in our possession In the 
middle of the field. 

In the second quarter, Brewer 
started things off by making first down, 
but on the next play New Hampshire 
got the ball on a fumble. They 
attempted a forward pass, but Massa- 
chusetts was penalized 1 5-yards for 
Interference, New Hampshire failed 
to gain, in two downs, and was penal- 
ized 15 yards for holding. Swasey 
then punted to Smith on our 40-yard 
line. Brewer and Williams each 
made first down. Smith tried for a 
goal but the ball fell short. For the 
rest of the half, the play zigzagged 
back and forth with frequent punting. 
Brackett attempted another place kick 
which fell short. Quarter and half 
ended with the ball on our 35-yard 
line. 

The third quarter opened with New 
Hampshire kicking off to Smith on the 
25-yard line. After failing to gain, 
Brewer punted, and New Hampshire 
returned the punt. Brewer made first 
down, then failed to gain and again 
kicked. An exchange of punts gave 
us the ball in the center of the field. 
Brewer got off a oretty forward pass to 
Samson. Then New Hampshire held 
for downs on the 30-yard line and 
received the bail, and punted to Smith 
In the center of the field. Brewer 
tried an onside kick, the ball going to 
Brackett. New Hampshire punted to 
Brewer, on the 45-yard line, who ran 
it back to the 25-yard line. Smith 
tried a drop kick, but the ball fell short. 
Several exchanges of punts gave us 
the ball on New Hampshire's 30-yard 
line. Then Smith pulled off a for- 
ward pass, and the quarter ended with 
our ball on the 21 -yard line. 

The last quarter started with an 
attempted forward pass, Swasey get- 
ting the ball and running 100 yards to 
our goal line, but the score was not 
allowed because New Hampshire had 
to take a penalty of 5 yards for inter- 
fering with the pass. After failing to 
make any gain, Smith drop kicked a 



goal from the 25-yard line. Score. 
M. A. C. 8, N. H. 0. 

New Hampshire kicked off to Wil- 
liams, but M. A. C. was penalized 15 
yards for holding on the kick off, and 
New Hampshire was given the ball on 
our 40-yard line. A forward pass 
went wrong and we received the ball 
on our own 25-yard line. Gore 
replaced Smith at quarter. The rest 
of the game consisted of an exchange 
of punts, until the last minute of play 
when Brackett missed a try at goal 
from placement. Gore picked up the 
ball on our 5 -yard line and advanced it 
10-yards. This ended the game. 
Score, M. A. C. 8. N. H. 0. 

The line-up: 

MASSACHUSETTS. NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Larsen, Curran, re le. Jones 

Hayden.rt it. Morgan 

Walker Capt.. rg 

Ig, Crosby. Willard, Leach 

c, Perkins 

rg. Peuingill. Weeks 

rt. Jenness 

re, Kllcy. Jenkins. Foster 

qb. Brackett 



Hubert, c 
Baker. Ig 
Samson, It 
Egerton. I« 
Snnith. Core, qb 



Moreau. Nlssen, rhb. Ihb. Lowd, Capt. 

Brewer. Ihb rhb, Swazey 

Williams, fb (b, Haines 

Score— Massachusetts 8. New Hampshire 
0. Touchdown— Brewer. Goal from field 
-Smith. Umpire — Foley of Amherst. 
Referee— Stevenson of Exeter. Field judge 
—Gardner of Massachusetts. Head lines- 
man — Holden of New Hampshire. Lines- 
men — Thomas of Massachusetts and CatUn 
of New Hampshire. Time— Four l5-mln- 
ute periods. 

SUNDAY CHAPEL 

The first Sunday chapel preacher of 
the year was Dr. L. Clark Seelye of 
Northampton. Although the head of 
a women's college for many years, he 
Is still, as President Butterfield said, 
essentially a strong virile "man's 
man." Choosing as a text John 
17:3. "And this Is life eternal, that 
they might know thee, the only true 
God, and Jesus Christ, whom thou 
hast sent." he went on to show how 
the cravings of a soul were satisfied by 
the eternal, ever living God. 

The Jews marvelled at Christ's 
knowledge of God : whence came it? 
He referred to no books except the 
Bible. He did not belong to any of 
the prevalent schools, and indeed con- 
fessed his Ignorance of many things; 
yet when he spoke of God, It was with 
settled convictions. If a man spoke 
thus now. he would be called a blas- 
phemer. Christ was no agnostic, his 
Ideas of God were clearly defined. 
Rather than change them he was 
ready to die, -and they crucified him. 

What life Is, whence It comes and 
whither it goes, is a question to which 
scientists can give no real answer. 
One thing Is certain: every life must 
be fed, and for every life there is food. 
The mind will not grow unless fed by 
other minds, and Its achievements will 
be proportioned to the quality and 
amount. 

"Knowledge Is the food of the 
soul," Is an old Socratic saying. Yet 
In the higher personal qualities love 
must be satisfied by the love of some 



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$3.50 to $5.00 

- $5.00 and $6.00 

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Jeweler and Optician. 



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Oculists' prescriptioni filled. 



Kodaks, 

Eastman Films, 

Victor Talking 
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Victor Becords, 

Fountain 
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Leather Goods. 



DRUG STORE 



Tub Wobthv. 



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SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



Amherst Corner !■ Rathskellar. 




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rnOTOGRAPHER 

The best workmanship. 

The latest styles. 

Reasonable prices 

Lincoln Building, Amherst, Mass. 



The Prospect House 



PERRY'8- 



The place to eat after the game. 
Attractive tables and rooms. Excel- 
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MRS. E. E. PERRY 

Ihere are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

GOAL 



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A Specialty of College Classes. 



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Northampton, Mass. 



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one else. If a man has no one to 
love him, he will degenerate. The 
soul dies within a man If It has nothing 
to feed It. To mal<e a man what he 
ought to be ; to bring out the best in 
him. he must know the best in others. 
No finite spirit can ever satisfy the 
deepest craving of the human heart. 
But there Is a complete, ever-living 
God, who can satisfy the craving with- 
in us. If it were not so. It would be 
I at complete variance with Nature 
elsewhere. A God has been revealed, 
and there has been no period when He 
has not been teaching men more 
knowledge about himself. The one 
supreme interpreter of the ages is 
Jesus Christ, who has shown the om- 
nipotence of God by his revelations of 
the Eternal Father. 

What has been accomplished In the 
earthly life gives reasonable hope that 
In the spiritual life there shall be still 
more. Each advance In knowledge 
brings an advance In spiritual power, 
until we come unto the perfect man 
and a full knowledge of the nobility of 
God. 



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Ml. ■root. Xmp mi— «» I 



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Diamond Merchants 



PhlladelpMis Official Fratemlti Jeweler 



SPBOIALISTS IM 

Pratemity Badfcs, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Chsrtns Priies Trophies. 

Medals Collefe Pit>s, Fobs, Sesls, 

Rinfs, Charms.-. 



BIBLE STUDY 

Through the efforts of the Y. M. C. 
A. there will be offered to the men of 
th« college, courses In Bible study, 
held tn the chapel at a time suita 
ble to all. to be announced. 

There are to be four courses consti- 
tuting a series of twelve lessons, end- 
ing before the Easter holidays. 

The courses are : 
1 9 1 2- 1 9 1 3- -Social Significance of the 

Life of Jesus by Professor 
Eyerly. 

Parables of Jesus by Pro- 
fessor Lewis. 

I914_The Life of Saint Paul by Pro- 
fessor McKimmie. 

l915_Thc Life of Christ by Mr, 
Ralph J . Watts. 




Sanderson 

&f Thompson 

m 

Announcement !! 

Our Fall and Winter Outfitting for 
students is now ready. You may 
confidently look to this store for the 
very latest fashions. 

Oiif Piices Never Preveol a Sale 

We want you to feel at perfect 
lil>erty to look as long aiul as often as 
you like without buying. 

This is the home of the Hart, 
Schafner & Marx clothes. 

Interwoven hose in all grades, 
asc 35c and spc. 

IMioenix silk hose, 50c. 

The Arrow IJrand and H. & I. 
collars. 

Everything you may need for your 
wardrobe at pri« es no one can under- 
sell. 






Sanderson 

&f Thompson 

Clotlilers, Hatters, Tailors 



PROMINENCE IcoTRELL and LEONARD 



YOU WILL FIND 
A FULL LINE 



LANDSCAPE ART CLUB 

On Tuesday, Nov. 7, Prof. A 
Anderson MacKimmle will give a 
stereoptlcon lecture on "Italy and her 
Art," at French Hall. A short busi- 
ness meeting will be held just before 
the lecture and all men interested in 



Is given here to the fact that we take 

special care in the posing of 

subjects in order to bring 

out all the good 

features. 

Light and shade is skilfully diffused. 

This and the excellent finish makes 

our l>H()T()(iRAl'HS masterpieces 

of reproductive art. 

SHILURES STUDIO. 

142 IMalo SI, NorthamptoB 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 

OrdertWt at the AmhT.t Houm will rec«i« 
proiii{>t attention. 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Mailers 
of 



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To the American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



Toefll Mientka, 

Boot and Shoe Repairing, 



iJone wliile you wait. 




A«»lior»t, 



lahdscape gardening or art in general 
are cordially invited to attend meet- 
ings. These are to be held every 
other Tuesday evening and some of 
the best speakers on art or landscape 
gardening are to be secured. It Is 
also expected that several prominent 
landscape architects will address the 
club during the year. An attractive 
and very Instructive program has been 
arranged which will be published at a 

later date. 

At a recent meeting of the club, A. 
F. Muller ' 1 2 was elected president and 
Fred Kenney '13. secretary. The 
_, *% II n C* following were elected on the commit- 

Tlie College Drug More ^^e of arrangements for the coming 

year: Stephen Hamblin '12. chair- 
man, F. H. Culley '13 and J. Wat- 
Iklns. Jr. 



iVIOMM* 



CANDY 



TOBAOOO 



AT 



CANDY CANDY 

We have just received a large shipment of 

Leggett's and Fenway's Chocolates 

Fresh fron. the factory. A pleasant time guaranteed with each box. 

We carry a full line of 

Belie {Dead Sweeis, Wimwop BaKei's and wnliiBaifs miocoiaies 

i Henry Adams & Co. 



ill 



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Tlie Rl5X^-A.rvI* 



<>«*e 






The College Signal, Taeedaj, November 7, 1911. 



The College Signal. Toeeday. November 7. 1911. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 

the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agrricultural College. 

BOABD OP EDITOBB. 

ALDEN C. BRETT. !912 Edttor-ln-ChW. 

R. H. VANZWALENBURG. 13. AMtitant Editor. 
JESSE CARPENTER, JR .1912 M«n«r1ne Editor. 
MARSHALL C. PRATT. 1912. Competition Editor 
ROYAL N. HALLOWELL. 1912. Athletics. 

JOSEPH A. HARLOW. 1912. Athletics. 

OSCAR C. ANDERSON. 1913, AhimnI Nol«». 
SILAS WILLIAMS. 191?. D«p«nm«nt Notw. 

S. MILLER JORDAN. 1913. Co.i«g« NoiM. 



BUSIirSSS DEPARTMENT- 
ALBERT w. DODGE. 1912. Bu«ln««« Manse*'- 
GEORGE ZABRISKIE 1913 A««. Bu«. Manae«r. 
ERNEST S. CLARK, JR., I9U. Circulation. 
CHESTER E. WHEELER. I9U. Circulation. 
STUART B. FOSTER. 1914. ClrcMlStloii. 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Albekt W. Dodcb. 



Entarad as saoond-ctaia mattor at tho Amhorol 
Pom Offica. 



Vol. XXII. TUESDAY. NOV. 7. No. 8 



What about the college post-office? 
Are the men forgetting that it has a 
purpose on the campus and that it is 
for their benefit that it was instituted? 
The first heavy drain on pocket-books 
coincident with the opening of college 
is now over. Why not hire a box, 
you who have not already done so? 
At present less than half the boxes are 
rented. If they were all taken the 
service could be almost doubled, tour 
or five malls a day. Why have your 
mall delivered at the house several 
hours after reaching Amherst and then 
only twice a day, when you can have 
It before chapsl, at dinner time, in 
the afternoon, after supper and again 
In the evening? It is not merely a 
matter of college spirit to have your 
letter box, it is rather a misfortune on 
your part If you haven't one. The 
post-office needs the support your dol- 
lar will give th>im. Line up and hire 
a box tomorrow morning. 



There will be found at another 
place in this issue the announcement 
of a concert to be given in the chapel 
next week. Here is something worthy 
of the support of every man In college. 
We have altogether too little of this 
sort of thing at M. A. C. The work 
Is planned to be intensely practical 
and there is little which tends to 
refinement or real culture. To be 
able to appreciate the beautiful in art 
or music should be as much the aim 
of real education as the pursuit of the 
technical knowledge. A man who 
does not care for such things never 
finds the greatest possible pleasure In 
life. It is hoped that this concert will 
be the first of a series of similar enter- 
tainments to be held at intervals dur- 
ing the winter, but that will depend 
entirely upon the success of this first 
venture. The price is ridiculously 
low and can be a real obstacle to none. 
Help the undertaking along by attend- 
ing even If you think you can not 
appreciate it. 



COLLEGE NOTES 

A squad of about 20 men reported 
for indoor rifle practise. 

The first compufsory Sunday morning 
service was fairly well attended. 

Judging from appearances "Old 
John" has joined the college regiment. 

Professor Chamberlain gave a strong 
and well attended talk at Y. M. C. A. 
meeting. 

Draper '15 fainted while at drill, 
Tuesday, and Is now at his home in 
Milford. 

Report has it that the class of 1914 
has cornered the available supply of 
zoology artists. 

Many Dartmouth men who came 
down for the Dartmouth-Amhersl 
football game visited friends at M.A.C. 

Hutchinson's orchestra performed 
successfully In public Friday evening. 
Professor Hutchinson wielded the 
baton. 

The French club held a business 
meeting Wednesday, under President 
Hamblin. The meeting was well 
attended. 

The first Irniex copy has been 
returned for proof reading. All signs 
point to the issuing of the book about 
Dec. 5th. 

The Sophomores have evidently 
forgotten that "specials" are subject 
to college discipline as well as 
Freshmen. 

A call was Issued Wednesday for 
candidates for the Sophomore football 
team and so far about 20 men have 
reported to Manager Hutchinson. 

Needed: — a correspondence course 
In electrical engineering. Information 
especially desired on "How to run a 
dynamo." Address power station. 

The second team, accompanied by 
a small delegation of rooters de- 
scended upon Wllliston academy Sat- 
urday afternoon. W III Iston won 15-0. 

Owing to strenuous protests from 
Captains Williams and Curran no 
further write ups will appear on the 
"Roughs and Toughs," In this 
column. 

Professors Lewis, Eyerly and 
McKlmmie will have charge of Bible 
study classes this year. A large num- 
ber of men have already signed up for 
the courses. 

A rousing class smoker and gen- 
eral good time will be held by 1913 in 
the Union room Wednesday evening. 
Pipes, cider mugs and reminiscences 
will be in order. 

Sergeant Lee led a troop of 10 
tried sharpshooters to the rifle range 
on Wednesday afternoon. Literally 
speaking they got "cold feet" and 
came back without firing the required 
number of rounds. 

Captain Martin spoke on "College 
Spirit" at Wednesday Assembly and 
the talk was a timely one. Although 
confined to the house by illness, it Is 
evident that he has kept well posted 
on current events at M. A. C. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Dally and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



EWELL'5 




It's a good thing not to worry about 
your pedal apparel, its correct, style 
comfort or durability. 

Buy your shoes from 

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•• Walk Over, " Haywood Shoes, 

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Bolles " Special, " Stetson Shoes, 
fS.oo to 98.00 



STUDENT 
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CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
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LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



REPAIRING DEPARTMENT 



E.M. BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Next to Corner Drug Store. 



Angier, '13. 



Clark, 13. 



We have a full line of Banners, Vo*\ 
Cards, College Songs, Seal Papers, Foun- 
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COLLEGE STORE 

BASBM BNT OP NO. COLLEGE 



Eldridge, '14. 



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An almost perfect imitation of a 
bargain counter rush was given Sat- 
urday night at the Union whist smoker 
when refreshments were served. It is 
to be hoped that some of the partici- 
pants laid by a store of edibles— they 
tried hard enough. 

A short mass meeting was held after 
assembly on Wednesday at which the 
feasibility of holding a banquet and 
smoker, directly after the game at 
Sprlngeld. Nov. 18, was discussed. 
A large number expressed a willing 
ness to take up the matter. 

Feb. 16 will be the date of this 
year's Junior Prom The following 
men have been elected to the Prom 
committee: Benjamin F. Ellis of Ply 
mouth, Willard S. Little of Newbury- 
port, J. Dudley French of Hyde Park. 
Ralph J. Borden of Fall River, Glover 
E. Howe of Marlboro. Harold F. 
Jones of Campello. Harold B. Bursely 
of Peabody. Everett H. Cooper of 
Greenwood. 

STOCKBRIDGE CLUB 

The regular meeting ot the club on 
Tuesday evening In Room G South 
College was well attended Boland '12 
and Madison '12 spoke of their sum- 
mer work, leading a discussion on the 
value of the farm methods observed. 
The stock judging and apple packing 
contests in which teams have recently 
been entered were discussed and a 
number of contemplated changes In 
the rules were mentioned. 



ASSEMBLY 

President Butterfleld spoke before 
the men at the assembly hour on sev- 
eral subjects pertaining to the policy of 
the college. He Introduced Captain 
Martin who was greeted with a long 
yell, this being his first appearance 
In college this fall. He spoke at 
considerable length on the work cf 
his department, and the requirements 
and responsibilities of the men In 
college. 

NOTICE 

On and after Thursday Nov. 2, 
exerslses of the following classes 
scheduled at 11 -30 a. m. for Monday. 
Wednesday or Friday, will close at 
12-15 p. M. : 

Aigricultural Education (1) 
Chemistry (13) 
Economics (1) 
Agronomy (1) 
Exercises for classes scheduled at 
11-35 A.M. and the Drill at 11-50a.m, 
on Tuesdays and Thursdays will close 
at 12-15 p. M. 

It is expected that students will be 
present for the entire hour of any 
exercise unless absent by definite 
arrangement with the Instructor. 



•SCRUBS" MEET DEFEAT. 

Saturday afternoon the "Scrubs" 
met defeat at the hands of the fast 
Wllliston eleven by a score of 15-0. 
The •'Scrubs"put up a good showing 
considering the fact that this was 
their first outside game. Wood '12 
was a good ground gainer, rushing the 
ball hard, his kicks were excellent 
and he tackled well. Mellcan, 
although a trifle slow In getting off his 
plays, punted well and made several 
phenomenal tackles. Dodge did the 
unexpected at center, making perfect 
passes and getting a large proportion 
of tne tackles. Sautir and "Jim" 
O'Brien seemed to be in every play 
and both prevented touchdowns. 
Casey was practically the whole Wll- 
liston team, doing all the punting, 
gaining nearly all the ground and mak- 
ing all thrte touchdowns. 

Wood *12 tried a drop kick from 
the 40 yard line in the early part of 
the second period, but the ball fell a 
few feet short. A number of forward 
passes were tried by both teams but 
only one cf Wllllston's w; s successful. 
Three times the "Scrubs" had the 
ball on Willlston's 20 yard line but 
each time someone fumbled. In the 
third quarter Mellcan fumbled a punt 
and Wood ' 1 2 recovered behind the 
line for a touchback. 
The summary: 

WtULlSTON. ■S.RUBS •' 

Mulligan, re >«• O'Brien 
Gumback. rt >«. Edwards 
Jervsls. rg »«• ^^ 
Clifford, c C.Dodge 
Neugent. Ig 'f- Bannister 
Solotterbech.lt . rt. Jordan. Wood '14 
Schr.mcck. le «• Sauter 
Maloney. qb <!*>. Melican 
Casey, rhb 'hb- Little 
Earley. Ihb rhb. Wood 12 
Penny, fb 'b. Jordan. Hager 
Score— WilHston 15. "Scrubs" 0. Ref- 
eree- Smithhurst of S. T. S. Time-two 
12 and two 10 minute periods. 



EVERY STUDENT 

Taking agricultural chemistry should keep up with 
present developments as well as grounding himself in 
principles. We wish every student would send us a 
postal card request for Mr. Bowker's latest circular 
treating of 

AVAILABLE SULPHUR 
IN ACID PHOSPHATE 

It Is A "Live" Subject. The Circular Is Free 
" Stuily the Plant Fwd Problem " 

DAU/l^rP Fertilizer Company 

Dv II IVIjR 43 Chatham St. Boston 



F. A. SHEPARD. 

MEN'S STORE 

Ruppentieimcr's 
Fine Clothes 

FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 

Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOM TKIIORING k SPECIUTt 




Thomas Hemenway. 'la, M. A. C. Representative 



Tufts cross country team suffered 
Its third defeat, this time at the 
hands of the University of Vermont 
by the score of 30-14. R. W. \ 
Atwater winner of the run here failed ^ 
to finish. 



THE FOOTBALL SPOTLIGHT. 

Saturday's game with New Hamp- 
shire State was very satisfactory In Its 
results. It showed clearly that the 
defeat at the hands of Tufts the week 
before was due to the poor physical 
condition of the men rather than to 
poor playing. The "Aggies" are 
playing the game now and it is high 
time, for the end of the season Is but a 
matter of two weeks. Comparative 
scores are of little value In rating a 
team but they do give some ideas. 
In the first game of the season Rhode 
Island took the measure of Captain 
i Walker's men by a 5 to score. 
I The same team has continued to play 
'phenomenal football since. Yet. a 
I week ago when Rhode Island played 
New Hampshire, it was lucky to carry 
off the honors by a score of 9 to 8. 
' And now when the "Aggies" score an 
8 to win over the same team and 
but a week later, it goes to show the 
way that the latter eleven has devel- 
oped and improved since the first 
game of the season. 

A feature of Saturday's game was 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, Hd PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 



DUDLEY 

oUTflTTER IN 

Fine Athletic Goods 

FOR EVERY SPORT 



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Flowers for all occcasions. 

Mail or telephone orders given 
prompt attention. 

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If you are getting the 
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then you are eating at the 

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J. W. KOUSK, Prop 

Have you tried our 25-cent Dinners? 
If not, why not? 




"Thc 5tST In Ttic World" 
Write for cataloge. 



diaries H. Dudliiif 

HANOVER, - - N. H. 

Agent, HAZEN *14 



.* 



The College Signal, Tuesday. November 7. '9'^- 



The College Signal. Tuesday. November 7. 1911. 



GOODS FOR MEN. 

C. & K. Derbys, 
Keiser Cravats, 

English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 




Highest Grade Roses 

We are offering to our local patrons, selection from our large 
stock of finest Roses, especially grown for the Nkw York and Boston 
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Northampton. 660. 




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BROWNING, KING & CO., Boston 

Wednesday and Thursday, November 8th and 9th 

SHOWlNii rHKIK FALL AND WINTKK LINKS OK 

CLOTHING, FURNISHING GOODS AND HATS 
ScDoorand College Pbotographers . . . 




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These .Studios offer the best skilled 
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will be ple«w<l U» show i.,Hrii|>leh an-l -tyleHof 
Winter Suits and Overcoais. 

H. B. WHITK, l!»15. Hunts BIcK-k 
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STEAM FITTING, Telephone $9-4 

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PrenslnR and Cleanlnjf a Bp.rlaHy 

MoHt liberal ticket ByKtoiii In town 



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TELEPHONE 1079-3. 

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the teamwork displayed by the Bay 
State men and their ability to use the 
open style of play. It is this latter 
characteristic of the eleven which is 
to be of most importance in the two 
remaining games. Trinity defeated 
M. A. C. last year by a close score. 
This year she is represented by prac- 
tically the same team, but the "Ag- 
gies" are comparatively much strong- 
er than last year and should carry off 
the victory. The last game, that 
with the Springfield Training School, 
always affords plenty of chance for 
speculation. The future physical 
directors are unusually strong this year 
but then, haven't they always appeared 
to be that way? Even when they 
scored on Harvard and held Yale to 
low scores, the "Aggies" went down 
en masse and came back victori- 
ous. The coaches realize that the 
Training School team is too heavy for 
line smashing tactics and are drilling 
their charges rather for open style play. 
In the last ftw games ihe forward pass 
and onside kick have worKed to per- 
fection and this Is the sort of offence 
which can bring the best results. 

In Trinity the team will have to 
deal with the combination of a light 
line and a heavy back field. John 
Moore holds ihe lightweight record, 
weighing in at only 148 pounds, but he 
has had little difficulty in handling men 
much heavier, by reason of his aggres- 
siveness. Speed is the salient charac- 
leristic of the team, and weight Is 
never aamitttd by Coach Gettell as a 
substitute for it. Kenney 187 and 
Bleecher 180, are^the only heavy men 
in the line at present, and are at the 
same time very fast. It is a note- 
worthy fact tiiat all three of the backs 
are 100 yard men on the track team. 
This explains to some extent the 
success of the wide end run constantly 
used by the team. Lawlor at half- 
back is a valuable man In Interference 

especially. 

Trinity's schedule this year differs so 
much from ours that it Is difficult to get 
comparative scores. They had played 
Worcester Tech previous to our game 
and won 60 while our score was 1-20. 
Trinity had no game on Saturday but 
will piay New York University to-day. 
thus making two games for this week. 
Up till Saturday, Oct. 28, Trinity, 
Brown and the Army were the only 
ones of the more Important teams 
which had not been scored on. Brown's 
defeat by Harvard and Wesleyan's 
score of 13 points against Trinity's 14 
leaves West Point alone in that class. 
Next Saturday with Brewer In the 
backfield to pound Trinity's line and 
Larson and Egerton to stall their fast 
backs there will be little doubt as to 
our outcome with the "College on the 

Hill." 

Trinity's line-up for the game will 

probably be as follows : 

Ahern \t, John Moore It, Fitzpat- 
rlck Ig. Bleecker c. James Moore rg, 
Kenney rt, C. Howell re. Cook qb. 
Lawlor Ihb, Collett rhb and Hudson fb, 



ALUMNI NOTES 

•09.— Arthur Ward Hubbard was 
married to Miss Grace E. Russell at 
Suffield, Conn., Nov. 1st. The 
ushers were Fred C. Warner '09, 
Samuel S. Crossman '09, Earl J. 
Robinson '12 and Joseph W. Covlll 
•13. 

' 1 1 .— Bernhard Ostrolenk, teacher 
of Agriculture In Slayton, Minn. 



FOR FARMS ! 

Big, Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building Lots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W. R BROWN 

Savings Bank Bl'k, 

Amherst, Mas*. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

OrrirE Hou«$: 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

Hijrh-GraUi Collect Work 



LAUNDRY 



Shirts. 
Collar ». 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wa.%h, 
Same, rough dry, 



10-150 

2C 
*C 

40c per doz. 
- 2%c per doz. 



Ralph R Parker, agent. C. S. C. House, 

85 Pleasant St. 
Krancis S. MadiM)n, agent for 1915 and 

short course. Vet. Lab. 
DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 
Kred S Merrill, agent, C. S. C. House, 

85 Pleasant St. 
Put full name and addresa (m laundry 



Foot Ball 
Hockey 
Track and 
Field Sports 




Wright iDitson 

Headqyartirs 
(or 

Athletic Supplies 

Pallet Bail "H AthWes who 
want the real, si- 
perior articles for 
the »arlou8 sport8_^ 
should Insist opon^'^* 
those bearing the 
Wright & Ditson 
Trade Mark 

Catalogue Free 

Wright & Ditson 

334 Washington St. 
Boston 

NewYorii „ ^ , Chicago 

San Francisco ^ ^^^ 
Proildenci Ciihrtigij 




CoBii. Vallej 81. Rj. Lines 

FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

J7 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from i A. M. to 4 A. M. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES. 

ENTOMOLOGY. 

The Department has just received 
a Llllle Imbedding oven for use In his 
tological work In the laboratory. 
pomology. 

The Junior class begins pruning next 
week. There have been a number of 
calls upon the department, for pruning, 
and there will probably be a demand 
for men to do this kind of work during 
the spring vacation. There have also 
been calls from all parts of the state 
for local demonstration work. 

FLORICULTURE. 

On Saturday afternoon and evening 
the department held a chrysanthemum 
exhibition in Wilder Hall. The dis- 
play was one of the Urgest ever seen 
at the college, about nlnety-six differ- 
ent varieties being shoi/n. There 
were nine decorative taoles put up in 
competition by the students besides a 
large mass display. Two premiums 
were offered lor table decoration. Trie 
first prize of five dollars went to 
Butler for a display of white blooms 
prettily arranged wtth candle sticks 
and smllax. Headle was awardeo 
second prize, a "Scott's Florist's Man- 
ual " for a table of maroon and white 
blooms. The show was enjoyed by 
many visitors and according to Prof. 
Waugh was the best ever held by the 
college. 

AGRICULTURE. 

W. p. B. Lockwood, Professor of 
Dairying, recently attended the Na- 
tional Dairy Show In Chicago. 

As New Hampshire and Massachu- 
setts were the only colleges In the 
New England Federation willing to 
send corn-jodging teams to the Corn 
Exposition held in Springfield this week, 
the contest was declared off, 

••Clean Milk" by Professor Lock- 
wood, Is the title of the last number of 
of the "Facts for Farmers" series. 

A pamphlet has recently been 
printed on "The Lecture Courses of 
the Massachusetts Agricuhural Col- 
lege," giving a list of nearly one hun- j 
dred fifty lectures by thirty-four lect- 
urers. These treat nearly every phase 
of farm life, at present. M. A. C. 
is the leading college in the country In 
this work. 

EXTENSION DEPARTMENT. 

The Extension Department Is mak- 
ing a large exhibit at the Corn 
Show which is being held in Spring- 
field. Prof. E. D. Wade Is to be one 
of the judges. 

The Extension Department is plan- 
ning to run a trolley special of three 
cars through Worcester County Nov. 
20-25 inclusive. Five or six towns 
will be covered in a day during which 
lectures will be given on the selection 
of corn seed. Its cultivation, harvesting, 

and the best methods of feeding. 
One of the cars will be devoted to the 
schools Lectures will be given on 
the forming of school clubs and similar 
lines of work. 




THE 
SMOOTHEST 



•' 1 
' 'ii 



COME. boys, a cheer— All to- 
gether — ^V-E-L^V-E>T — smooth. 

Velvet cheers you on and cheers 
you up. It's so smooth. The 
selected leaf is hung in the ware- 
house over two years — changing 
harshness to complete mellowness. 
Then all "bile" has disappeared 
— and good Urte and the enjoyable 
imoothne** are pre-eminmt. Thi» "lime 
proccM*' it not paienled— Jurtcorts ut 
j more — and the retult U " Velvet" — 
tmootk and woodeiiully pleaaing. 

Now €>oce mote — everybody — 
V-E-L-V-E-T — waooibl Al all 
dealctt. 

CPAULDING &. MERRICK 
Chicago 





FoU Two 
Oaacc Tir 



Orchard. Pay Better Than Oold Mine. When Fertlllied WHIi 

GENUINE THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER! 

I.RIZE IS ViO^ BY THfi DREW MUNSON FRUIT CO.. of LHtl.lo«. ««.. 

Their Prl«e Winning Acre ol U»IJ«»n Apples 

UAVH THB^ A TOTAL RBTURN OF ,7.S.70-THH NET PROFIT WA. #..••• 



JK?L^?.?i'>'*wJV.^6E|IIIIIIE mW PHOSPHITE POWDEi.^oL.!iV" peVa1k£ 

, , . , ,1 .w.n. L.tt.r Kro,„ B.rne, Ilrother,. the Pamo«, ^""/•-*'" '"'l..'^^,*::'''"*' "^ 

sZ.^, <:..«"., Show. 1 hat Thom« Hho.ph.t. Powder Br.ng, . I -.e I.. 

Every User In the Form of a Profitable Crop : 

iVwhen W^ had over i W can to harvnt in ab^t 
two iveeks s* we had this year^ n^, ,^m At*Ut 

than those ut errw veher, trr aH-Ufd a g«od 
TeJng of noma, I'hcfhali Pauder. Th, 
btst lold at retail for |o oo ^er barrtl. 



The <'>K Mortimer Com^ahv. 

'^"lIrrK";dto Thoma, Phosphate P<n^*r, 

V..11 will recall that we bought of you last year 
r^'/7^"aml we wt.h to .ay that it ^-^'rJ^,:','. 
excellent result,. On «>"' P^^'^'j.^;' 'j'J'*-.T]ir J 

^\rhe^j^U7rLr/oi'a;e. frAii^uai':/ 

r A*-/^./^rf n'dThe W»rV«-V,y.>. r.*r* r*- 



Vourt truly. 

Barnks BuoTHRas. 



THHRE IS A TRUTH IN ALL THIS FOR YOU I 

Th. whole story is toM in the N«w K .iition of our Booklet. '"P^ToJJat. 
Pruudrowtng." which U «n. free if you mention Thk CoLtsoR S.OHAU 

The Coe-MortimerCo.,M7^KTE'Rs5i Chamber St.. N.Y. City 

Weahodistributefrom BOSTON. MASS.; Belfast Mains: B*'-J'*'«""« 
mo; PH.LA.. PA.; NoRroL.. Va.; Savannah. Ga.; Lham- ston. h. C. 



♦ ^ 



^, 



ft 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 7, 1911. 



Pi. J. Lapoile, iDC. 



Proprietors of 



flUrO-LIVERY-HORSE 

Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 

Tel. 183. 



ASK YOUR 

STATIONER 

FOR 



Ward's Fountain I'ens, Fine Papers 
and Envelopes, Students' Supplies. 
Send for samples of Kngraved Invita 
tions, Class and Fraternity Paper, 
Banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, etc. 




SAMUEL WARD CO. 



WilfiD'S 



5763 Franklin Street 
BOSTON 



Athletic Outfitters 

Complete line of 

Foot Ball, Base Ball 

Track and 

Hockey Supplies 

SWEATERS AND 

SWEATER JACKETS 



The M. A. C. Agent is Thomas 
Hemenway, 1913. Kindly refer all 
orders to him. 



WM. READ i SONS 

IJOSTON, MASS. 



cold weather and snow comes you 

had better look at the 6-inch and 

9-inch Moccasin Cruiser 

WOOLLEY '14 

Winter Boots and Moccasins 
Indoor Moccasins 

COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 

Custom Work 

Holland's Block, Phoenix Row 



H 



Massaciiusetts Asricuiturai College 

Forty-fifth year has opened with the registration 
of four year men aggregating 4?! ; to date of Sep- 
tember 23. The distribution by classes is as follows : 



Seniors, - 


- 84 


Juniors, 


. - 98 


Sophomores, - 


- I2S 


Freshmen, - 


-.64 



Corresponding registration for other years has 
been : 



1906 
1901 - 
1896 

Send for a catalog. 



319 

81 



KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, PRESIDENT 

AMHERST. MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association. 

N:neteen Hundred Twelve Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Tnirteen Index, 

T . M. O. A. , 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club. 

Dramatic society, 

Debating Society, 

Public Speaking Council, 



H, C. Walker, President 

Geo. H. Chapman, Secretary 

C. C. Pearson, Manager 

R. J. Borden, Manager 

R. T. Beers. Manager 

H H. Wood, Manager 

S. M. Jordan, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

O. G. Anderson. Manager 

F. S. Madison, President 

L. S. Caldwell. President 

J. D. French, Manager 

W. J. Weaver. President 

A. F. McDougall, President 

W. J. Birdsall. President 

J. M. Heald. President 

T. J. Moreau, President 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



Telephone Connection 

TAILOR AND PRESSER 

Fall and Winter Suits 

Chevrons and Stripes 

Put on Military Suits 

Full Dress Suits to Rent 

Gents' Furnishings 

Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

Z424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Allen Bros. 



■— ~-^' — ,-, 1 VT l^.x.- I J I rki 1 . 




Amherst. Mass., Tuesday, November 14. i^'^ 



Contractors. & Builders. ■ ^I^^T^^ii^'^^i^i^^^^^ pres. m. s. burton 



Painting. 



Electrical Work. 



Amherst, flass. 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber 5hop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 



m TDtPSY PARLOR 

CI-EANSINO. 

PRESSING, 

REPAIRING. 

Quickest Mrvlec, B«at Work, Lowest Prloa 

Ml woik carefully done. Work called (or and 
delivered, (ients' overcoat*, suits, pants and 
coats, toadies' tine linen suits a specialty. 

Wn. FRANKLYN. Prop. 



RMf Nash Bl'k. Amherst. 



T*L No. 34a-4 



CARS 



Leave AOQIB COLLEQE for HOL- 
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CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AOOIE COL- 
LEUE at 7 and J7 mim. paat eacli 
HOUR. 

Spactel Can at RmmmM* RatM 



AIHERSI ( SUNDERLAND ST. Rf. CO 



THE NEW ENGLAND NEWSPAPER 

All the news and the Truth 
about it, in the :: 

Springfield Republican 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 
News fully reported. 

BEST SPORTING PAGES 

The Weekly Republican will be sent 

free for one month to anyone 

wishing to try it. 

Daily, $8. Sunday, %i. Weikty, %i. 



Junior Cl.«» Holds Q.thering in Social 
Union Room. 



Of Smith College Gives Stirring Talk at 
Sunday Chapel. 



A social gathering and smoker was 
held by the Junior class last Wednes- 
day evening, in the Social Union 
Room. North College. Nineteen 
hundred and thirteen turned out m full 
force, to this class affair. A gener 
ous keg of cider and "smokes" were 
the chief attraction. A roaring fire in 
ihe fireplace added materially to the 
enjoyment of the evening. Tne 
program included music and speaking. 
Professor Sprague who has recently 
been elected an honorary member 
of the class gave an Interesting 
and Impressive talk. The program 
was concluded by the singing of the 

college song. 

This smoker Is the first of a series 
of gatherings of similar character 
which the Junior class intends to hold 
during the winter. They have more 
than a superficial significance. The 
class of 1913 believes that good class 
spirit makes good college spirit. "Get 
the 1913 s pirit." 

ASSEMBLY 

Professor Lewis spoke at the Assem- 
bly on Wednesday. He gave the stu- 
dents a talk on certain phases of col- 
lege life, as he has viewed them since 

his arrival. 

Student government, Professor 
Lewis slated has unusual opportunities 
here at M. A. C. where the democratic 
spirit Is so strong and the attitude of 
the faculty so favorable. He spoke 
also about enthusiasm and college spirit. 
He said, "Do you suppose a fellow 
will get far who says, 'I think we are 
going to win.' " A team which goes 
into a game with this Idea, nine times 
out of ten. will get beaten. The right 
Idea to have Is that we are going to 
win. Enthusiasm and faith are real 
elements of success. He said that 
what was true of a college team was 
true of a college In all Its activities. 
Get the Idea that we will make this the 
best college In New England and have 
faith in it. and success will surely 
follow. 



PHI KAPPA PHI 

Across the Mississippi. Sixth Chapter 
is Founded at Iowa State. 



TRINITY VICTOF 






Y. M. C. A. 

The Y. M. C. A. was addressed 
Thursday by representat ives of the " M en 
and Religion Forward Movement." Dr. 
Dawson, of Springfield, chairman 
of the Social Service Committee, 
spoke briefly about the general scope 
of this new work. 

Mr. Potter, a Springfield business 
man, and chairman of the organization ^ 
addressed the men on "What is a, 
man worth. " 



Sunday morning the students lis- 
tened to Pres. M. L. Burton, ot 
Smith college one of the strongest, 
and most forceful speakers ever heard 
atM. A. C. 

He said, in part: There are two 
ways of living: by drifting or by care- 
fully laid plans, and the question l 
ask is this: -"Which way are you 

drifting?" 

We see around us many examples 
of drifting, creatures of circumstance ; 
with nothing to drive th-m forward to 
the full realization of their purpose. 
On the other hand, we occasionally see 
men peculiar In the best sense of the 
word, whose atmosphere and person- 
ality are Inspiring. 

The fact comes to a full fruition as 
we view it not only in the lives of In- 
dividuals but m the history of countrys : 
Africa, with her 170.000.000 of peo- 
ple, does little to Influence the events 
of the world, because tne people are 
occupied with supplying their imme- , 
diate necessities. In Rome, with) 
her law. organization, and mastery of 
conditions, we see the mysteries of the 
world. Coming face to face with the 
fact that one man drifts and another 
man plans. It Is more logical to say 
that the educated man should plan his 
life. But which plan should be 
chosen? There are various ones. 
One man wants to be strong, with a 
powerful body, another to have a clear 
brain and mental acumen; a third to 
possess money ; while some must have 
a life of pleasure. 

To decide what our plan shall be, 
these facts must be taken Into account 
to realize the plan of plans: First, 
any plan you adopt must take into ac- 
count what you are, your powers and 
potentiality. The first duty of every 
individual IS to make the most of the 
hopes, the aspirations, the high am- 
bitions that God has Implanted in his 
soul Next, he must take into ac- 
count the rights of others; to do some- 
thing that will help the other fellow; 
and lastly, loyalty, unqualified alle- 
giance to duty, the thorough-going de- 
votion to a cause, is absolutely neces- 

sary. 

Choose something that seems un- 
attainable. When a man accom- 
plishes that which he set out to do. 
he is really dead, unless at the same 
time something still is left in his heart 
I that he can press forward to. The 

winners are those who have striven. 

and to the strivers alone Is victory 

given. 



As a part of the movement now in 
progress to extend.the honorary frater- 
nity of Phi Kappa Phi in various pans 
of the country, a new chapter was in- 
stalled on Monday. Oct. 23rd, at thr 
Iowa State College. Ames, Iowa, m 
accord with the unanimous vote of the 
Board of Regents. About thirty 
charter members were Initiated and 
the occasion proved altogetner an 
enthusiastic and Inspiring one. There 
was displayed a "splendid spirit of 
determination to uphold and encour- 
age a high standard of scholarship." 

The fraternity now has chapters In 
the University of Maine, the Pennsyl- 
vania State College, the University of 
'Tennessee, the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College, the Delaware College 
of Agriculture and the Iowa State 

Colliege. 

The Installation of the Iowa chapter 
has carried the fraternity across the 
Mississippi and In the wake of empire 
has followed another wave of devotion 
to higher things. 



Team Fights Gamely Agaif ^^ "»« 
Conditions, Losing 35-6- "♦^ ^ " 

Plays Great Gai o "c 

.^ hit 



t^ 



*ix\ to 



RECEPTION AT PRESIDENT'S 
HOUSE 

President and Mrs. Butterfield gave 
a reception at their home last Tuesday 
afternoon and evening. Invitations 
were issued to a large number of Am- 
herst people, including members of 
the facuhles of both colleges, and to 
many acquaintances in nearby towns. 
Mr. and Mrs. Ray Stannard Baker of 
Amherst were the guests of honor. 
Under the supervision of Prof. E. A. 
White the Interior of the house was 
artistically decorated with chrysanthe- 
mums and smllax from the college 
conservatories. 



M. A. C. CATHOLIC CLUB 

At a meeting held Sunday, the 
Catholic men of the college got 
together and organized what Is to be 
known as the M. A. Catholic Club. 
The following officers were elected: 
President, Herbert J. Stack; vice- 
president. John L. Mayer; secretary. 
Thomas J. Godvin ; treasurer, John 
P. Palmer; seargeant-at-arms, Lewis 

R. Sellew. 

The club then saw fit to elect as Its 

spiritual director Rev. Father Bell, 

I pastor of Saint Bridget's church. 

I Amherst. After the meeting a short 
talk was given by Father Bell in which 
he told of the good work that Catho- 
lic clubs are daing at Harvard, Instl 
tute of Technology and other colleges. 



Saturday our team ^ m 
def.at 11. a hard fough £ ^ = with 
Trinity. Ail through f-^^ ^e our 
men played for ali there was ... them^ 
After the first quarter Trinity seemed 
to have everything their own way and 
,hay succeeded with end runs and for- 
ward passes to tun up a score of 35 
points while Gore .r>aae a touchdown 
for us on the srcond attempt In the 
last four minutes of play. 

The first quarter the teams broke 
about even, our men having the ball 
most of the time. The second period 
proved Trinity's best because she suc- 
ceeded in getting 17 points. The 
period opened with the ball In our pos- 
session about .n the m.dfleld. The 
first play did not gain our team any 
around and though an attempted kick 
was blockedby Trinity's left end, Ahern 

,he ball was recovered by Smith. 
Then a forward pass to Curran was 
blocked by Trinity's left half back, 
Lawlor. A double pass to Nlssen 
gamed lor us eight yards. Brewer 
now tried a kick from placement but 
Lawlor succeeded in getting through 
and tackling Smith and no gain was 
n,ade Brewer next tried an onslde 
kick when gave the ball to Hudson. 
Trinity's full back and ten yards was 
gained for Trinity on a line plunge. 
Following this came a series of punts 
which eventually landed the ball on otar 

10-yard line. Brewer attempted to 
kick out but the ball was blocked ar,d 
Trinity's right tackle Howell succeeded 

m getting the ball and was downW on 
our 5-yard line. A line plunge nfetted 
Trinity practically no gain but l^ the 
second attempt Hudson succeeded In 
getting through center for a touchdown. 

The goal was missed. Score. 5-0. 

Smith then kicked off for us but the 
ball did not go over 10 yards. Trinity 
here showed her ability In using the 
forward pass and Ahern "lade a 35- 
yard gam for them. Then Trln ly 
tried another forward pass to Collet 
who went over for second touchdown. 
The goal was kicked by Kinney. 

1 The question was then brought, 
whether the officials had seen that tne 
forward pass was not made by Cook to 
Ahern from five yards back of line of 
scrimmage. The officials ruled the 

I pass legal. The coaches were In favor 
of having the team withdraw from the 
field but the students refused to con- 
sider It. 

Smith kicked off. then Cook the 
Tilnlty quarterback returned with a 



\ 



The College Signal, Tuesday. November 14, 1911. 



The College Signal, Tueaday. November 14. '9"- 



punt and after a few attempts to gain 
distance around the ends and through 
the line Brewer attempted an onside 
kick which w^s blocked by Ahem who 
succeeded in getting the ball and made 
a run down th;; side of the field 30 yards 
for anotntr thouchdown. Goal was 
kicked and score n'^w stood 17-0. 
After a c upe of scrimmages tlie 
pericd ended wiih the ball on our 35- 
yard line. In the third period Trinity 
succeeded in making several gains on 
forward passes Giidersleeve getting 35 
yards on cne. These p;i.sses and 
s vrra> hne piui ges put the ball on out 
1 5-yard line and Kinney took the baii 
over for a toucnaown on a forward pass 
from Cwok. Goal was kicked by Kin 
ney. Sc re, 23-0. This was the 
only tDU-hdown scored this period. 

The tourtn and last period started 
with both teams pre'ty well tired out 
but Trinity after a series of punts fre- 
quently exchanged and long runs by 
Hudson and Collet succeeded in get- 
ting another touchdown and Kinney 
succeeded in kicking the goal. Score, 
29-0. More punting followed and the 
ball was finally on our 15-yard line 
and an attempted kick by Brewer was 
blocked and Howell grabbing it was 
tackled by Gore but succeeded In roll- 
ing over the line between the goal posts 
for Trinity '3 last touchdown. Kinney 
kicked the goal. Score. 35-0. 

With but a few minutes to play 
Brewer, Merrill and Moreau by line 
plunges succeeded in getting the ball 
down to Trinity's 1 0-yard line. Then 
a forward pass was tried from Brewer 
to Gore but was a failure. Trinity 
then tried a line plunge but as it netted 
then no gain kicking was resorted 
to. Again the ball was brought back 
In Trinity's territory to their 15-yard 
line and Gore succeeded in getting 
over for our first and only touchdown. 
Brewer kicked the goal. Score, 35-6. 

Trinity then kicked off from the 
center and after a line attempt Brewer 
kicked. Time was then called leaving 
the ball in Trinity's territory. Through 
the game Trinity was very lucky In re- 
covering fumbles and in carrying out her 
plays. Brewer and Nissin did excel- 
lent work for the backfitid and Merrill 
proved himseif a ground coverer sev- 
eral times. 

As the Springfield Republican puts 
it "The score does not tell the hard 
fight it cost Trinity, nor of the unflag- 
ing spirit of the Massachusetts team." 
Our tjoys certainly put up a game fight 
but were unable to cope with Trinity's 
open play. There were about 150 
students down to tiie game and several 
times Trinity's student cheering was 
drowned out by our own. 

The lineup: 
THiNmr. AiSCtes. 

Ahern, Hill, le re. Curran. Huntington 

D Howell. Kinney, it rt, Hayden 

John Moore, D. Howell, Wesels, Ig 

rg, Walker 
Bleecker, c c, Hubert, Johnson 

James Moor*, Leland, rg Ig, Baker 

Kinney. C. Howell, rt It, Samson 

C. Howell, Giidersleeve, r« le, Edgerton 



Cook, Smith, qb 
Lawlor, Ihb 
Collett. rhb 
Hudson, fb 



qb, Smith, Core 

rhb, Nissen 

liib. Brewer 

fb, Williams, Merrill 



Touchowns— Collett 2, Hudson, Ahern. 
Kinney, C. Howell, Gore Referee— Joy 
of Yale. Umpire— Lowe of Dartmouth. 
Field judge — Crowley of Bowdoin. Head 
linesman— Wolsey Johnson of Trinity. 
Time— 15-minute quarters 



S. T. S.-M. A. C. GAME 

The final week of football practice 
for our team is here and on Saturday 
the Aggie eleven go . Into the camp of 
the enemy for their most important 
contest of the season. Since 1890, 
every loyal "Son of Old Massachu- 
setts" has gone to Springfield and sup- 
ported the team to the last whistle. 
The by-word has been and still will be 
this year, "Beg. Borrow or Steal, but 
go to the Springfield game." 

Perhaps a brief account of our foot- 
ball relationship's with Springfield 
Training School might bring the great 
importance of this game to the atten- 
tion of the ''.ew men. 

The athletic relations between the 
two Institutions began In 1890 but 
it has only been during the last ten 
years that a very close connection has 
existed between them. Since 1900. 
an annual game with S. T. S. has 
been played and during that time the 
Aggie elevens have won seven games. 
tied one in 1908 and lost in 1909 
and 1910. The greatest reason for 
these last two defeats was that a large 
number of men were lost from the 
team by graduation, thus leaving in- 
experienced and green men for the 
coaches to develop. 

While It appears that S. T. S. has 
had only 14 points scored against her 
and our team has 94 chalked up 
against us. thereby making Springfield 
a favorite in the coming struggle. 
It should not be lost sight of that 
M. A. C. played two elevens of the 
'Big Six," namely Dartmouth and 
Brown, whose combined scores alone 
added up to 48 points. 

Beg, borrow, steal or hike it, but 
be in Spnngfield next Saturday after- 
noon. The probable lineup of the two 
teams will be as follows : 



M. A c. 

Larsen, Curran, re 
Hayden, rt 
talker (capt ), rg 
Hubert, c 
Baker. Ig 
Samson. It 
Edgerton. le 
Smith, Gore, qb 
Moreau, Nissen, rhb 
Brewer. Ihh 
Williams, fb 



S. T. S 

le. Mcrner 

it. Brlggs 

Ig, Deaver 

c, Gregory 

rg, Collings 

rt, Swenson 

re, Doane 

qb. Mann 

Ihb, Beghold 

rhb. Home 

fb, Metzler 



Each midshipman at A- napills may 
take only three girls to the series of 
hops th's winter. That Is. the total 
number of girls whom he accompanies 
must not exceed three during the 
season. There doesn't seem to be 
any objection to his taking the same 
girl throughout the season If she Is 
willing. 



UP-TO-DATE 

* COLLEGE FOOTWEAR * 



Elite Shoes, 
Swell Shod Shoes, 
Pumps the fit, - 



$3.50 to $5.00 

$5.00 and $6.00 

$4.cx) 



EXPERT REPAIRING 



Pages Shoe Store, 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes. 



,02 Main St. Northampton. Mass. 



BETWEEN THE BANKS 



^E. N. PARISEAU,^ 

Barber JS^ Shop 

RAZORS HONED 
No. 2 Pleasant. St., Araherat. Ma*». 

THE 



DEPARTMENT NOTES. 

FLORICULTURE. 

At a recent meeting of the Boston 
Gardeners' & Florists* Association, 
a committee of seven was appointed 
upon the suggestion of President But- 
terfield and Professor White to act as 
an advisory comm.lttee regarding teach- 
ing methods, experimental work and 
the lines of extension work in floricul- 
ture which would be of the most value 
from the view-point of practical men. 
This committee consists of J. K. 
M. L. Farquhar, Boston, chairman, 
Peter Fisher Ellis ; Thomas Roland, 
Nahani; Eben Holmes, Montrose; 
William Sim. Cllftondale ; Robert 
Cameron, Cambridge; J. A. Pettig- 
grew, Jamaica Plain. 

The department has recently In- 
stalled a bulb room, soil sterilizer and 
twenty lockers for students In the base- 
ment of French Hall. 



I Kir3ch6a3m"oS«s.| 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

LKNN GKINDIMO 

Full lime of ColUgt Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



Kodaks, 

Eastman Films, 

Victor Talking 
Machines, 

Victor Eecords, 

Fountain 
Pens, 

Leather Goods. 



de:ue:i.*s 



DRUG STORE 



Thb Worthy. I Hoowr & Smilli Co. 



FRANK H. DANFORTH. Mok. 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



Amherst Corner In Rathskellar. 




rnOTOGRArHER 

The best workmanship, 

The latest styles. 

Reasonable prices 

Lincoln Building, Amherst, Maaa . 



The Prospect House 

-PERRY'8- 



The place to eat after the game. 
.Attractive tables and rooms. Excel- 
lent service. Catering a specialty. 



MRS. EI. C PERRY 



Ihere are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 



or 



C. R. ELDER 



6ie Ch«stnut St.. PhiUdelptila 



Jewelers and Silversmiths, 



Diamond Merchants. 



Plilladelptila's Official Fraternity Jewelir 



SPEOlALItTS IN 

Fraternity B.dtes, Fobs. Nov.ltiet. 

Rings. Charm* PriiM TrophiM 

Medalt CoUef* Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, ChsTins.-. 



. • . 



YOU WILL FIND 
A FULL LINE 
OF 




& Cigaieties 



TOBAOOO 



AT- 



The College Drug Store 



EXTENSION DEPARTMENT. 

During the past two years there has 
been a constantly increasing demand 
from farmers In every part of the 
state for very definite forms of aid in 
solving some of their problems. More 
calls have been made for lectures, 
demonstrations, and two-day meetings, 
than the extension department has 

been able to supply. 

In view of this the department has 
organized a five day extension school. 
This is a new departure for the colUge 
and is the first of Hs kind In New 
Er.gland. The purpose of these new 
courses Is to give practical help to 
those who are unable to come to the 
college for any cf the longer courses. 
These extension schools are to be 
held this coming winter In a few com- 
munities, m which the need is most 
urgent. They are to be of live days 
duration, and are to include lecture 
work and practical demonstrations In 
Agronomy, Dairying. Fruit-growing 
and Poultry-raising. Courses in home- 
making for women will also be given. 
The courses are to be granted upon 
application. They will be given In 
that part of the community or section 
most easily accessible to all. 

Professor Hurd left Sunday to at- 
tend a meeting of college and exper«- 
ment stations held in Columbus, Onio., 
Nov. 15-17. 

ZOOLOCY. 

Professor H. T Fernald has given 
to the department for the museum an 
albino shrew. 

ENGLISH. 

Prof. Robert W. Neal has just pub- 
lished a composition training manual, 
entitled: "Thought Building in Prac- 
tice. " This will be used as a labora- 
tory supplement for class room train- 
ing m the freshman theme writing 
courses. 




Sanderson 

Of Thompson 

Faii 
Announcement !! 

Our Fall and Winter Outfitting for 
students is now ready. You may 
confidently look to this store for the 
very latest fashions. 

OtttPmNevetPtmntaSale 

We want you to feel at perfect 
lil^erty to look as long and as often as 
you like without buying. 

This is the home of the Hart, 
Sch«fner& Marx clothes. 

Interwoven hose in all grades, 
250. 35c and «oc. 

l>l.oenix silk hose. 50c. 
The Arrow Urand and H. Ct I. 
collars. 
Kvervthinn you may nrrd for your 
wardrobe at prices no one can under- 
sell. 



Sanderson 

& Thompson 

Clotliiers, Hatters, Tailors 



ad E 



ALBANY. 
N.Y. 



N'aieii 



PROMINENCE Cy].£L 

Is givrn here to the fact thai we take 

special care in the posing of 

subjects in order to bring 

out all the good 

features. 

Light and shade is skilfuHy diflfu-ed. 

This and the excellent finish makes j ^ 

our PHOT()ORAHH.S masterpieces ^ OOWNS 

of reproductive art. 1 ^fj^^^^.^^,,. ,„ o.l .^en !,..... ti.e A. 

SHIIURE'S STUDIO. 'un,., t-.th... n. cw -^ - 

142IWalnSt., Northanipton ^^ - 




M.B.MAGRATH&SON 

Passenger and 



Toefil Mientka, 



Boot and Sti03 Repairing, 
Baggage Transfer. "<>- -•'••^ >'^" *"* 



Ord,r. left at tt.e Amherst HouM w.ll rec..*. 
prompt attention 



At-Ml»or»t, 



>l(ii 



t I 



"Mike" Brewer has been elected 
captain of the sophomore football 
team. 



CheeilorWWssacliusetts 

Before the big game clear your throat with 

RexaU Cherry Bark Ju Jubes 

After the big victory use ^. , , a4.,.^r^^ 

RexaU Bronchials or Tickle Stopper 

No excuse for being hoarse Sunday. r^^„„Vy Cxrmir* 

RexaU Cherry Bark Cough Syrup 

Will stop your barking quicker than defeat. 

Our Expectorant Cough and Throat Wafers 

Are excellent and very handy to carry in your pockets. 

Henry Adams & Oo, 

'Tl^e RKXAI-I- Store 



! 



rK 



mm 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 14, 191 1. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 14. '9" 



THE CO LLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evenln( by 

the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOAfiD OP KDIT0B8. 

ALDEN C. BRETT, 1912 EdMor-ln-ChM. 

R. H. VANZWALENBURC. 13, Aulmnt Editor. 
JESSE CARPENTER. JR .1912 Manarlnt Editor. 
MARSHALL C. PRATT. 1912. Competition Editor 
ROYAL N. HALLOWELL. 1912, Athletic*. 

JOSEPH A. HARLOW. 1912. Athleilca. 

OSCAR G. ANDERSON. 1913, Ahimnl Noia* 
SILAS WILLIAMS. 1917. 0«partin«nt NotM. 

S. MILLER JORDAN 1913. Colteg* No(m. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912. Bu*in«u Maiwear. 

GEORGE ZABRISKIE 1913 AM. Bua. Manaeer. 
ERNEST S. CI ARK. JR.. 1914. Circulation. 

CHESTER E. WHEELER. I9M, Clrculatton 
STUART B. FOSTER. 1914. C«iaill*tai. 



Subscription $1 50 per year. Single 
eopies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Albert W. Dodge. 



Entered as aaoond-clua iMttar at the Amkmm 
OWaa. 



Vol. XXII. TUESDAY. NOV. 14. No. 9 



The use of the library In freshman 
lectures has been discussed for some 
time but from appearances one might 
conclude that one of the most import- 
ant points had been ovorlooked. The 
library is not intended to be an annex 
to the social union room, neither is it a 
place where a group of fellows may 
get together to discuss the day's 
assignments. It is particularly annoy- 
ing to an upperclassman who intends 
to consult reference boolts lo find him- 
self in the midst of an algebra or 
geometry seminar. If the librarian 
and his assistants cannot keep order it 
Is time the senate took the matter up. 
The study room in North College is 
provided expressly for the purposes 
mentioned above and it should be 
clearly understood that they are out of 
place in the library. 



and extinguished before any great 
damage was done. One day a year 
or two ago the riot act was read to the 
students because someone had used an 
extinguisher to see how it worked. 
At the recent fire two or three extin- 
guishers were brought into use before 
one in a workable condition was found. 
To let fire-fighting apparatus become 
useless in a dormitory or other build- 
ing where thirty-six men and several 
thousand dollars' worth of property are 
housed, certainly shows criminal neg- 
ligence on the part of those in charge. 
Consider what might have been 
the result last Wednesday if the blaze 
had broken out after 12 o'clock at 
night with ail the lights out and 
extinguishers worthless. Another 
point very much worth while consid- 
ering — Are the rusty, dilapidated- 
looking fire escapes safe as provided? 
Would they withstand the combined 
weights of several men? If the col- 
lege authorities will not provide better 
and more adequate fire protection it Is 
up to the men living in the dormitories, 
for their own safety, and the safety of 
their personal property, to demand 
such appliances and lights as shall 
reduce the fire hazard to a minimum. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 




EWELL'5 



The idea of having a sort of winter 
carnival at Junior Prom time was pro- 
posed too late last year to act upon, 
but with the idea in mind this year It is 
the general opinion that this would be 
a novel and enjoyable addition to the 
festivities. The plan as suggested 
would include a hockey game when 
our athletics would be shown to their 
best advantage by one of our strongest 
teams. Preceding the game there 
might be arranged show-shoe and ski 
races if the weather conditions per- 
mitted. In the evening the pond 
could be utilized for a skating party 
with the college band, (following the 
advice of Captain Martin) dispensing 
fitting melodies. The cross-walk 
affords good shelter for the band plat- 
form and a refreshment booth. The 
afternoon and evening of the carnival 
would afford a fine opportunity for 
those who are not attending the prom 
to bring over their "friends" when the 
college is in its festive clothes. 
Think It over prom committee. 



A FIRE started in North the other 
evening but was luckily discovered 



COLLEGE NOTES 

"Big Sam" — the silver tongued. 

The Friday night mass meeting 
brought forth some good spirit. There 
are three meetings coming this week. 

"i don't l<now your subject, 

Can pass your exam, 

But I've got your numt>er just the same." 

If there was any one star in Satur- 
day's game, it was Hubert. He cer- 
tainly backed up his talk of Friday 
night. 

Just a thought at twilight. 
When dormitory lights burn low. 
Comes from sixty students — 
"Why and where does the current go?" 

Trinity had a stand full of loyal 
rooters in the persons of about 300 
of Hartford's young hopefuls who were 
given free admission. Their cheering 
was one of the pleasant features of the 
game. 

"Just you smile and smile with 
vigor and we'll try to do the rest, but 
this job is getting bigger and it's lone- 
some work at best." — Picked up in 
Passing column, Amherst StiKlent. 
We can sympathize. 

Assistant Dean Lewis occupied the 
first part of Assembly hour and a short 
mass meeting was held at the close of 
his talk. A plea for more men on the 
football squad was followed by an- 
nouncement of an Informal for Nov. 
25th. 

Professor A. Vincent Osmun 
college is to conduct a course of lect- 
ures on elementary botany under the 
auspices of Springfield Museum of 
Natural History. There are to be 
ten lectures extending from Nov. 15th 
to Jan. 3 1 St. 

About 70 men went down to the 
Trinity game with the team and man- 
aged to make considerable noise. 



STUDENT 

FURNITURE, 

RUQS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



It's a good thing not to worry about 
your pedal apparel, its correct, style 
comfort or durability. 

Buy your shoes from 

The Shop That Has The Style 

" Walk Over, " Haywood Shoes, 

I3.50, I400, I5.00 



Holies " Special, " Stetson Shoes, 

$5.00 to $8.00 



RRPAIKING DEPARTMENT 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Next to Corner Drug Store. 



Angier, '13. 



Clark. '13. 



We have a full line of iianners, I'ost 
Cards, College .Songs, Seal I'apers, Foun- 
tain l^ens. Candy, Tonic and Student 
Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

BASEMENT OF NO. COLLEGE 



Eldridge, '14. 



Tarbell, '14. 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. 

Amherst, 



Phillips Block 
Mass. 



^2krp^n-ter & Morehouse, 

PRIflTERS, 



No I, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mast. 



H. E. KINSMAN, 

College Photographer 



NASH BLOCK, MAIN ST., 
AMHERST, :: :: :: 



MASS. 



High-grade artistic work. Perfect satisfaction guaranteed. 

Studio newly equipped with laige sky light 

and special lense for large 

groups. 

All styles the latest. Fine picture framing. 



pplnlons may differ on the subject. 
Las one man exclaimed "It must 
lave been a great blow to their respec- 
five families when the referee and 
lleld judge lost their eyesight." 

A well attended Y. M. C. A. rally 
vas held in Chapel Thursday night. , 
j)r. Dawson of Springfield, Professor ^ 
strykor, chairman of extension com- 
niitee and C. P. Potter chairman of 
ihe central committee of the '-Men 
ind Religion Forward" movement 
vere the speakers, explaining the 
lidea and scope of this fast growing 
In.ovement. 

The Trustees of the Massachusetts 
Lgricultiiral College voted, at a recent 
meeting, to establish a tuition fee of 
|$40 per year for student? who are cit- 
izens of the United States but not 
Lgal residents of Massachusetts; itiis 
tuition charge will be made to those 
attending the college for undergrad- 
uate work of college grade. The rule 
will go Into operation Sept. 1, 1912, 
but will not affect students having 
entered the institution prior to that 
Idate. 

LIBRARY 

Recent books that hive been added 

ho the library: 

1 American Journal of Physiology-vols. 

24 27. 1900 1911. 
[American Society of Aeronomy pro- 
ceedings 1907-1909. 
Annales de la Science Agronomique - 

1906-1910. 
British Yearbook of Agriculture 1 908- 

1911. 
Clark. Ellery H— Reminiscences of an 

Athlete. 
Cooperatton-Vols. 1 2. 1909-1911. 
Omelin Krant— Handbuuch der Anor- 

ganiscen Chemle. 
Green— Law for the AmericanFarmer. 
Hays — Farm Development. 
Herrlson- Cato's Farm Management. 
Hewes — Book erf Hamburgs. 
Journal of Agriculture and Industry. 

1897 1907. 
Littrt.: — Dictionnaire de la Lan|;ue 

Francaise. 

Monroe— Cyclopedia of Education. 

National Irrigation Association— Pro- 
ceedings 1909-1910. 

Ruskln— Complete Works. 

Ward— Practical use of Books and 
Libraries. 

Winkelmann— Handbuch der Physik. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE NOTES 



Football practise by all freshmen 
was made compulsory at the Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin. All had to work 
out but were not compelled to take 
part In scrimmage unless they wished 
to do so. 

The Training school is having little 
difficulty in trimming everything she 
runs up against this season. There is 
no getting around It the future physi- 
cal directors are a husky crowd but 
then, Holy Cross had a mighty good 
team, too. Less than one week now 
before the big game. 



ALUMNI NOTES ] 

Among the alumni present at the , 

Corn Exhibit in Springfield were j 

Charles H. White '09, Roger Eddy 

'10, A. T. Conant. E. N. Davis, P. 

W. PIckard and P. A. Racicot '11. 

71. L. A. Nichols, president of 

Chicago Steel Taoe Co.. has recently 

donated to the Math department a 

considerable amount of surveying 

equipment. 

•83. —Edgar A. Bishop, Petersboro, 

N. H. 

•83. —David O. Nourse, Newbury, 

N. Y., R. F. D. No. 3. 

'83.— Domingos H. Braue, Barra 
do Piralry, E. Do Rio, Brazil. 

•88. Herbert C. Bliss won the 
consolation cup at the Highland Coun- 
try Club of Attl-rhoro, after defeating 
some of the best scratch men. 

92. Milton H. Williams. MD.V., 
Sunderland, was also a successful 
exhibitor at the corn show. He 
received a second prize of $".50 in 
competition for the most profitable 
acre of corn, also a first prize, sweep- 
stakes oi $!0 for the best ten ears of 

dent corn. 

•93. —Cotton A. Smith, 614 Trust 

8t Savings Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 
'94._Perley E. Davis of Granby, 
is to be commended for IMs high 
standards in agriculture. He received 
the following prizes at the Corn Exhibit 
in Springfield last week: H;.nipshire 
county prize $10, best 10 ears yellow 
(lint; Hampshire county prize $1. 
single ear samples 8 rowed flint; 
Hampshire county prize $1 , single ear 
samples 12 rowed fiint; acres exhibit 
1st $25, best acre flint corn; grasses 
and forage crops $2, 1st prize, sheaf 
of timothy; Bowker contest $75. 2d 
prize yield per acre; 2d prize, yield 
of corn on cob by weight. 

'97. j. M. Barry was a recent 
visitor at the college. This was Mr. 
Barry's first visit to the college since 
graduation. 

'99.__Dr. W. C. Hinds, state ento- 
mologist of Alabama is the author of 
an article entitled "The Cotton Worm, 
its Life and its Control." 

•01.— Perclval C. Brooks. 7201 
Champlain Ave.. Chicago, III. 

•01.— Nathan J. Hunting followed 
the advice of the rural sociologists of 
the college long before they were ever 
heard of. and went back to the farm. 
He is a good husbandman who believes 
in Shutesbury and who is showing the 
townspeople what can be done with its 
Und. On a number of tracts that his 
neighbors considered worthless soil, he 
has grown 350 bushels of first-class 
potatoes per acre. For several years! 
he has been harvesting good crops of 
excellent peaches. 

'03.— W. V. Tower of Porto Rico 
I has contributed a fine collection of 
; moths to the Department of Ento- 

! mology. 

I '04.— Captain and Mrs. W. A. 

I Paul or Seattle, Wash., announce the 



EVERY STUDENT 

Taking agricultural chemistry should keep up with 
present developments as well as grounding himself tn 
principles. We wish every student would send us a 
postal card request for Mr. Howkor's latest circular 



treating of 



AVAILABLE SULPHUR 
IN ACID PHOSPHATE 

li 1> \ "Link ' Sunjtd. Thk Cirhu.ar Ls Fkkb 
'• Stiitiy the riant Food rroblctn " 

D(\\11VV\> Fertilizer Company 

Dv 11 iV Li n 43 Chatham St. Boston 



I 




A. 




MEN'S STORE 



Kuppcntieimcr's 
Fine Clotties 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the French Shoe 




CUSTOM TWIORING A SPECIUTt 

Thomas Hkmenwav, '.2, M. A. C. ReprcsentaUve 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, iBd PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 

PARKS, 

FLORIST, 

Flowers for all occcasions. 

Mail or telephone orders given 
prompt attention. 

239 Main St., Northampton 

H you are getting the 
THE MOST FOR YOUB MONBT 

1 then you are eating at the 

O- Km NFXT TO POST OFFICE 

j J, W, KOUSE, ITop. 

' Have you tried our ajTcent dinners? 
, If not, why not? 



DUDLEY 

OUTFITTER IN 

Fine Athletic Goods 

FOR EVERY SPORT 



dp -^ 






"Tme 5c5T In Tut World' 
Write for cataloge. 




Cliarliis H. Dudley 

HANOVER, - - N. H. 

Agent, HAZEN '14 



'1* 

f 

m 



iMirS^^t^ti^ -^ ■**_ 



The College Signal. Tuesday, Novem ber »4. '9'^ 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 14, 191 1. 



GOODS FOR MEN. 

C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 

English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 




/!ffiaA6A66A6a*' •••■•••■•• • 



. *:^^a>ft<:yk*j<*w»^^wkv 



Highest Grade Roses 

We are offering to our local patrons, selection from our large 
stock of finest Roses, es|xrcially grown for the Nkw York and B«»ston 
Fi.owtR Makkei^. 

THE MONTGOMERY CO., Inc., 

HADLEIY, MASS. 

TELEPHONES. 

Amher»t, 190-R. 



Northampton. t>t>0. 




:: HI THiBEH'S COLLEGE LDP »LE 

BROWNING, KING & CO., Boston 

Wednesday and Thursday, November 8th and 9th 

SH()\VIN<; THKIR KALI, AND WINTKK LINKS OK 

CLOTHING, FURNISHING GOODS AND HATS 
Scbool and College PhotograpDcrs . . . 




I^OOALLY: 5* Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadley, Mass. 

Main Offke: These StuHios offer the l)est skilled 

1546-1548 Broadway, artists and most complete 

New York City equipment obtainable 



Aal am dlrertlf connected wllh m Wholesale 
iloiiM, i can 

SAVE YOU MONEY ON CLOTHES 

will ItP pleanol to show snmiik-a aii'l ^-tylt-M of 
Winter f*uU« «nil Overcoaw. 

II. H. WHITK, I!»I5. MiintB niock 
tJp One KllKlit 



STEAM KM TING, Telephone 5^-4. 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PLUMBERS. 



If you wnnt t<» l»e 

!>OI.II> WITH THK (illil.S 

you must Ikivi- yoiirrlotliCK |<rHi. .im| ai«l r'l«-Mnt;tl 

AT I2FST1SZN*S 

11 Amity St. MuKMtfi .Itore 

Prvmiinir diiil Ch-anlnft » up* rlnliy 

Mont liberal tl<Ki-t s\st«'iii In town 



Specialty of Kepairing- 



Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lkjhts, &c. 
i Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MASS 



M.D. OILMAN. C. A. MOrrET. 

TELEPHONE 1079-3. 

GILMAN and M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 

CONFECTIONERY. 

t07toSll Maim Stkkrt. 

WoRCESTKK, Mass. 



engagement of their daughter Miss 
Margaret Vye Paul to Fayette D. 
Couden. 

'08. — Marriage. James A. Hy- 1 
slop to Miss Grace Geneva Anderson 1 
on Saturday, Oct. 7ih. at Ocosta, 
Wash. 

'08. — Marriage. Joseph W. Wel- 
lington on Saturday, Oct. 7th. 

'08 T. L. Warner and E. D. 
Philbrick have been recent guests of 
A. L. Whitney, Urbana. 111. Mr. 
Philbrick is now on his way further 
west. C. E. Hood '06 is also located 
in Urbana. Mr. Whitney is a gradu- 
ate student in Agronomy at the Uni- 
versity of Illinois and plans to take his 
doctor's degree within a year. 

NINETEEN-NINE. 

Paul E. Alg-r, North Amht^rst. 
landscape forester and tree expert. 

Waldo D. Barlow, Boulder, Mont., 
forest service. 

Benjamin F. Barn-s. 200 Board- 
man St.. Have-hill, farmer 

O. C. Bartleit. Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural college, Amherst, graduate 
student. 

Orwtll B. Briggs. 43 Chatham St., 
Boston, with the Bowkrr Fertilizer Co. 

George M. Brown. Jr., Greenwood. 

Donald J. Caffrey, Connecticut 
Experiment Station. New Haven. 
Conn., supeilr.fndent Gypsy Moih 
Control. 

Patricio P. Cardin, Cuoa Exoeri- 
,iient S'atI >n. Santiago de las Vegas. 
Cuba, eiitorr.ologisl ana plant pathol- 
ogist. 

Edward I. Chase, 85 Vine St.. 
Somerviile, civil engineer. 

George M. Codaing, ^Munson- 
Whitaker Co. Fourln Ave. Building. 
New York Cny, forester. 

Lamer! S. Corbett, Kentucky Ex- 
periment Station, Lexington. Ky., 
assistant in animal husbandry. 

Harold P. Crosby, principal High 
school. Newbury, Vt. 

Samuel S. Grossman, Amherst, 
graduate student M. A. C. 

David A. Ciirran. School St., War- 
ren, with the Lucius Engineering Co. 

Homer Cutter, R. Box 5, Texar- 
kana, Tex., head of department of 
manual training and agriculture Texar- 
kana public schools. 

Myron F. Geer, 32 Moore Ave,, 
Springfield, with F. E. Geer & Co, 

Wayne E. Geer, Wethersfie'd, 
Conn., principal high school. 

Carleton C. Gowdey. entomologist 
for British government in Barbadoes, 
visited the college recently. 

Elmer F.Hathaway.97 Huron Ave., 
Cambridge, with C. F. Hathaway & 
Son, wholesale bakers. 

En- Lung Hsieh, Karl Strasse 5 
A II, Berlin, Germany. 

Arthur W. Hubbard, Sunderland 
farmer. 

Dorsey F. Ingalls, Cheshire. 



Warren L. Ide, Sterllngton. N. Y. 

foreman on fruit farm. 

Huang Jen, care of ButterfieldJ 
Luire & Co., Tientsin, China. 

Rockwood C. Lindblad, 15 Mathewl 
St.. Rochester, N. Y.. signal forema[| 
on N. Y. C. & H. R. R. 

James V. Monahan, with WarrerJ 
H. Manning, at present located at| 
Lake Bluffs, 111. 

FOR FARMS ! 

Big, Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building Lotsl 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W R BROWN 

Saving!) Hank Bl'k, 

Amherst, • Mass. 

E.B. DICKINSON D. D.S.I 

Williams Block, Amhkkst, Mass.! 

OrricB liouMs: 
«>t«> lU .rX. :M. ..««<» t«*^F».IM. 

AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

Hii^h-Gradc College Wot/: 
LAUNDRY 



Shiil.s. 
C"ollais. 
Cuffs. - 
Plam wash. 
Same. muRh dry. 



10- 15c 

K 
« 

40c per cioz 
25c per doz. 



Ralph K P.irker. aR,-nt. C. S. C. House, 

S5 rieasant St. 

Krant i.s .S. Madison, ^^twK for 1915 and 

.sliort course, \'et. Lab. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 
Kred S. Merrill, agent, C. S. C. House, 

85 Pleasant St. 
Put full name and address on laundry 



Wright &Ditsoi) 



Headquarters 
fir 




Athletic Supplies 



f^lTn'^frnni. Colleie Stydents JL 
•4,"!L. B... and Athletes who %J'^) 
HTcke^" wn' ^^^ ^"1, su- 
fi;rd\'\;L'rts penor articles for 

the various sports^^ 

should Insist upon*- '»» •" 

those bearing the 

Wright & Ditson 

Trade Mark 

(^ataloRue Free 

Wright & Ditson 

334 Washington St. 
Boston 

New York Chicago 

San Francisco 
Providence Cambridge 




West 
land- 

Wis., 



Conii. Valley 8L % \m 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
Liral department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
naterial and we have excellent roses, 
Lrnations,violets and chysanthemums 
[n their sea.son. Telephone or leave 
lour orders at the office in French 
[all. These will receive prompt 
md careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE -300 



IwOODVfARD'S 
LUNCH 

17 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 

Ilunches 

SODA, 

ICE CREAM, 



\chsed only from t A. M. to 4 A.M. 



Guy E. MacGown. Walnut Hill, 

^/e. 

Harold J. Neale, 2 Sturgis St., 

Worcester, 

Harold G. Noble. 2827 Linden 
Court. Chicago, 111., manager of 
Western Gardening and Forestry Co.. 
933 Marquette Building, Chicago. 

John Noyes, with W. A. Manning, 
landscape designer. 1101 Tremont 
Building, Boston. 

Joseph T. Oliver, 711 Lyceum 
Building, Pittsburgh. Pa., nature study 
teacher for Pittsburgh Playground 

Association. 

James R. O'Grady. Llttleton.N.H.. 
foreman on the Rocks estate. 

Harold D. Phelps. Box 245. 
Brookfield. with Brett & Hall 
scape gardeners, Boston. 

Richard C. Potter. Racine, 
military instructor and Instructor in 
chemistry, Racine college. 

C. S. Putnam, principal of high 
school, Walpole, N. H. 

George F. Sexton. 14 Blanche St., 

Worcester. 

Marcus T. Smulyan. Amherst, grad- 
uate student M. A. C. 

Myron W. Thompson. Cady, Wyo . 
•JU. S. F. S., located in the Shoshoiif 
National Forest, as forest assistant. 

Jared B. Thompson. Yonkers,N.Y., 
farmer on private estate of Mrs. John 

Reide. 

Henry W. Turner, Ensenada de 
Mora, Cuba, with Cape Cruiz Sugar 

Company. 

Fred C. Warner, Sunderland. 
Theodore C. Waters, Rocky Hi 
Conn., farmer. 

Charles R. Webb, Shrewsbury, 
C. R. Webb & Co. ,• foresters. 

James S. Whaley. 65 North Arling- 
ton St. East Orange, N. J., with 
Vacuum Oil Co.. of New York. 

Charles H. White. Uxbrldge, farmer. 

Herbert L. White, State House. 

Boston, second clerk to the secretary 

of Massachusetts Board of Agriculture. 

Luther G. WilUs.State College. Pa., ' 
assistant chemist, Pennsylvania State 
Experiment Station. 

William Wilson, Highland Road, 
Nahanl, florist. 

•09 —Paul Edgar Alger was mar- 
ried to Miss Mabel A. Puifer at North 
Amherst on Nov. 1 Hh. Stephen P. 
Puffer. Jr. '12 was best man. Oscar 
C. Bartlett '09 acted as an usher 

'10— H. R. Francis, superintend- 1 
ent of' grounds at the Culver Military 

1 Academy. 

1 1 -Isaburo Nagai is doing post- 
graduate work at Cornell University, 
majoring in plant physiology, under 
Professor Dugger, and taking his 
minor In plant breeding under Dr. A. 
W Gilbert. M. A. C. '04. 

•n -Pickard is with theBo*rker 
Insecticide Co.. 43 .Chatham Street, 

Boston. 

.11 _Racicot is m the employ of 
the Coe-Mortlmer Fertilizer Co. 




THE 

SMOOTHEST 
TOBACCO 

CROM Kick-off to ToucW V :. Velvet is pre^ 
r eminently the popular pipe pr rmenl! I he 
two years aging in the leaf gives Velvet ..atunng rare in 
these aays. Time only can produce It smoothness and 

the full flavor < v t'ts tobacco, and 
Ume it lakes Xo g. i rid of your old 
foe. "the bite!" \elvet— mellow 
and smooth, will unquestionably 
please \)OCi. AH dealer*. 
Don't hesitate! 

SPAULDING 
& MERRICK 

CHICAGO 




orchards Pay Better Than Clold Mine. When FertW^ed Willi 

GENUINE THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER! 

PR«B IS WON HY THB D«EW-«lUNSON PRU.T C« . f M«tl...«. M-. 
Thetr ITUe Winning AcreoC Baldwin Appl*» 
QAVE THEM A TOTAL RETURN OF »7l5.7<>-THfi NET Plf«.^ 



?^TriLiz"»'*wlVnBEIIiIlllt TjillOBS PHOSPHHTE PaWDEI.UoUi'^^PKVACKE 

\ »>«'»"«• ^-^^y jj^ i„ ,h, F„„., ..( a I rofi.able Crop : 



THH (nF MoRTIMFR (JOMfANV. 



Jv when ot" had oyer i W can to kantti in aocmi 

Iklfn thue vt grew vhfrt we "tP'**^ " *SS?, 

I tVil^i at rrtn,l for f,oo/^r barr,L 
I Vour» truly. „ 

BAKHM BUOTHFKI. 



THERE IS A TRUTH IN ALL THIS POR VOU I 

• » M in the New Kdition of our Booklet, 'Up To-OaU 
Th.? whole -ttory \s told in the INew r-au. signal. 

FruitGrowinK." which is »ent free .( you mention I HE CoM 

«, ,• r^ sPFxiAL CI Chamber St., N.Y. City 
The Coe-Mortimcr Co. IN, PORTERS 5 » '-"•*"'" 



*r\ 



't^msa^ttai.*= »^^M:> 



The College Signal, Tuesday. November 14, »9»'- 



PI. J. Laporte, Inc. Massachusetts Agricultural College 



Allen Bros. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Proprietors of 



BOrO-LIVEBY-BORSE 



Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 



Tel. 183. 




ASK YOUR 

STATIONER 

FOR 



Ward's Kountain I'ens. Fine Papers 
and Knvelopes, Stiuknts' Supplies. 
Send for samples «)f Knuraved Invita- 
tions, Class and Fraternity Paper, 
Banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, etc. 



Forty-fifth year has opened with the registration 
of four year men aggregating 4?! ; to date of Sep- 
tember 23. The distribution by classes is as follows : 



Seniors, - 


- 84 


Juniors, 


. - 98 


Sophomores, - 


- >aS 


Freshmen, - 


-164 



Vol. XXII. 



MASSACHUSETTS AORIC ULTURAIL 

AmherstTMass., Tuesday, November 21, 191' 



No. 10 



Contractors & Builders.^ rushing season ends 



Painting, 



Corresponding registration for other years has 
been : 



SAMUEL WARD CO 

WARD'S 



5763 Franklin Street 
BOSTON 



Electrical Work. 



igo6 


- 


219 


1901 - 




- «34 


1896 


- 


81 



Send for a catalog. 






TRADE » 




fSlMAPK 

Athletic Outfitters 

Complete line of 

Foot Ball, Base Ball 

Track and 

Hockey Supplies 

SWEATERS AND 

SWEATER JACKETS 



KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



Amherst, flass. 



SIGNAL 

The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association. 

N neteen Hundred Twelve Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Thirteen Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club, 

Dramatic society. 

Debating Society. 

Public Speaking Council, 



DIRECTORY 

H. C. Walker, President 
Geo. H. Chap.-nan, Secretary 
C. C. Pearson, Manager 
R. J. Borden. Manager 
R. T. Beers. Manager 
H H. Wood, Manager 
S. M. Jordan, Manager 
F. A. Castle, Manager 
O. G. Anderson. Manager 
F. S. Madison, Preslaent 
L. S. Caldwell. President 
J. D. French, Manager 
W. J. Weaver. President 
A. F. McDougall, President 
W. J. Birdsall. President 
J. M. Heald. President 
T. J. Moreau, President 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
EUcirical Massage 



AMHERST, MASS. 



The M. A. C. .\gent is Thomas 
Hemenway, 1912. Kindly refer all 
orders to him. 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets. Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CLEANSING, 

PRESSING. 

REPAIRING. 

guickcal iMsrvler, B»M Work, l.oWMt Prl.» 

All woik carefully done. Work called for anc 
delivered. Uent*' oveicoats. *uit», pants anil 
coati. Ladies' hne linen suits a specialty. 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rear Nash Brk. Amherst. 



Tel. No. 341 4 



WM. READ & SONS 

llOSTON, MASS. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



CARS 



FELLOWS 

It is but a short time before Christ- 
mas. What could be l>etter than a 
gift of a pair of Moccasins, Moc- 
ca.sin Cruisers or Indoor .Moccasins? 

WOOLLEY '14 

Winter Boots and Moccasins 
Indoor Moccasins 

COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

F$Hi Repairing a Specialty 

Custom Work 

Holland's Block, Phoenix Row 



Telephone Connection 

TAILOR AND PRESSER 

Fall and Winter Suits 

Chevrons and Stripes 

Put on Military Suits 

Full Dress Suits to Rent 

Gents' Furnishings 



Leave AOOIE COLLEOE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST lor AOQIE COL- 
LEUEat7 and 37 mlm. past eacb 
HOUR. 

Spectal C«r« at ReMOMble RatM 

AMHERST & SUNOtRLANO ST. Rl CO 



Jacob Reed's Sons .ire the leading manufacturers of 



M 



For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

JACOB Reed's Sons, 

Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1414-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



THE ItEW ENGLAND NEWSPAPER 

All the news and the Truth 
about it, in the :: 

Springfield Republican 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 
News fully reported. 

BEST SPORTING PAGES 

The Weekly Republican will be sent 
free for one month to anyone 
wishing to.try it. . 

Dai/y, %8. Sunday, $2. Weekly, %J 



SUNDAY CHAPEL 



About 70 Men Pledge to Fraternities. 

The season for "rushing" freshmen 
for the various fraternities closed last 
Sunday evening at 6 o'clock. Yester- 
day morning, at chapel, the following 

men pledged : 

Q T. v.— Hastings N. Bartley of 
Sandwich; W. C. Beebe of Water- 
to*/n, N. Y. ; Maurice J. Clough of 
Swampscott; Homer C. Darling of 
Mendon; Norman D. MacDonald of 
Melrose; Ralph E. McLaln of Mel- 
rose; George D. Mellcan of Worces- 
ter; Frank H. Weed of Brooklyn, 
N. Y.; and Lewis P. Warner of 



"BOOST OLD AGGIE 



*i 



Addressed by Ex-Oovernor Utter of 
Rhode Iiland. "Be Prepared." 

The speaker at Sunday Chapel this 
week was ex-Governor Uutter of 
Rhode Island. Mr. Utter has spoken 
at Assembly and Sunday services on 
previous occasions. 

He took as a starting point the 
story of the virgins, and his text was, 
•'Those who were prepared." 

He said : One of the things which 
strikes a man. who has passed the 
half.way mark In life, is that we grow 
old so fast. Within fifteen years you 
students will be carrying the loads of 



The 



SPRINGFIELD GAME 



fConifiMd Of nc* S-I 



ICenMiHMd o* pace SI 



Slo(an at Sophomore Banquet 
Held in Springfleld. 

••Boost old 'Aggie' " was the slo- 
gan at the banquet of the class of 1914 
of the Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege held at the Henking cafe Saturday 
evening. printed on the menu and echoed 
In every one of the speeches. The 
banquet was attended by ICX) members 
of the sophomore class, with whom 
President Kenyon L. Butterfield was 
present, as the guest of honor. 
Despite the disappointing outcome of 
the football game with the Springfield 
Training school yesterday, there was no 

(Conttn«i«iMPM«Sl 



5 10 /5 20 25 3035 4045 50% 5045^3530 25 20 15 10 S 

- 






RUSH 



omPH^ 

.— PENALTY 

* kxcubma 
ruuBLi 




>sr 



K 



Teem Makes Orand Fight Against 
Strong Opponents. Heyden, Hu- 
bert and Smith Star. 

Springfield Training School came 
out at the long end of a 12 to 3 score 
m the annual Aggie Springfield game, 
played on Pratt field Saturday. All 
of thescormg wasdoneln the first half. 
Sprmgfleld bucked the line for a touch- 
down In the first quarter after six min- 
utes of play and In the second quarter 
Mann of the Training School received 
a punt on the Aggie 35-yard line and 
ran through a broken field for the 
second touchdown. Mann kicked 
both goals. At the close of the first 
half Smith of M. A. C, standing on the 
Training School 25-yard line, booted 
the* oval between the posts, clearing 
the cross bar by not more than a foot, 
for the one field goal of the afternoon. 
When the teams lined up at 2-40 
o'clock, the physical directors were the 
big favorites. Some of the most 
ardent of the Springfield partisans 
expected to see a procession Instead of 
a game with Springfield In the lead. 
But those who paid their admissions In 
anticipation of a feast of touchdowns 
went away sadly disappointed. That 
big and powerful bunch of gridiron war- 
riors, which has defeated during the 
past season such teams as Syracuse, 
Tufts, Williams, and Holy Cross and 
has tallied more than ICX) points to 
about fifteen of its opponents, had the 
rougnest sort of sledding to make a 
win Saturday. They did take the 
measure of thi maroun and white but 
It was a case of "'GrecK meets Creek." 
Springfield fought every Inch of the 
way to victory and a couple of lucky 
breaks for Aggie mlgnt have told 
another story. As regards the score: 
It took just abjut two quarters for 
the home team to s.ze up tne speedy 
Springfield offense, and during that 
time SpringfleiQ salted away the game. 
During the last half the Springfield 
Interference was successfully broken 
up and the runner a number of times 
thrown for a loss. When quarterback 
Mann of Springfield was removed In 
the third period the team was materi- 
ally weakened. Mann is Springfield's 
Individual sUr. for whom all American 
calibre Is claimed and whose reputa- 
tion rests principally on his ability to 
gain through a broken field. 

M. A. C. presented the regular 
varsity lineup with Smith the choice 
for quarter and Brewer. Nissen and 
Williams In the backfleld. At some 
time or other every man In the lineup 
did some work of the stellar variety. 
Hayden was a stone wall on the defense 
and In spite of a severe gash over the 



V 



The College Signal, Tuesday. November 21, 191 1. 



The College Signal, Toeaday, November 21. i9"- 



right eye received early in the play, 
because of which it became necessary 
to take him out of the scrimmage tor 
a short time in favor of Griffin, finished 
the game strong and did mere than 
give a fair account of himself against 
Briggs. the husky opposing tackle. 
Nlssen and Brewer were the best 
ground gainer. Williams plugged the 
center of the line several times with 
good effect. Brewer did the punting 
and got off a number of beautiful 
spirals and the line held so well that 
but one or two of the kicks were 
blocked. Nlssen reeled off a number 
of substantial gains on skin tackle 
plays. Smith ran back punts well, 
often dodging or shaking off a number 
of the Training School tacklers before 
being finally downed. He advanced 
the ball for good gains in a number of 
quarterback runs. Hubert at center 
was a tower of strength and whenever 
the big Springfield backs tore through 
the center of the line he did not fall to 
spill the play. Samson blocked a 
couple of punts and with good luck 
might have handled a second forward 
pass. As It was, the only successful 
pass went to Edgerton. The Training 
School had also one successful pass to 
its credit out of a large number of 
trials. The Aggie ends went down 
fast under punts. After 25 minutes of 
play Larsen was taken out of the scrim- 
mage with an Injured knee and 
replaced by Curran. Edgerton made 
the most spectacular tackle of the day 
when he dove through three of the 
Training school interference and nab- 
bed the runner who was carrying back 
a punt. At guard Captain Walker and 
Baker played great ball and were on 
deck to the last whistle. Griffin, who 
replaced Hayden for a time and Gore, 
who went in at quarter during the last 
period gave a good account of them- 
selves. The rain of the morning with- 
out doubt kept many away but when 
the teams got into action In the neigh- 
borhood of 3000 people overflowed 
Pratt field. Considering the amount 
of rain that had fallen the field was in 
excellent condition with but a few 
really wet and heavy places. 

M. A. C. won the toss and received 
the kickoff at the north end of the field 
with the wind at their backs. Smith 
received the kick on the 15-yard line 
and returned it about 10 yards. One 
line kick and skin tackle play failed to 
advance the oval the necessary dis- 
tance and Brewer punted to Spring- 
field's 35-yard line. Mann tried an 
onslde kick and it was the home 
team's ball in midfleld. After a 
couple of line plays that netted only a 
few yards Brewer punted and Mann, 
receiving the kick on the Training 
school's 20-yard line, carried the ball 
to the Aggie 50-yard line. 

Hazel gained nine yards through 
tackle and Metzler made first down on 
the next play. A moment later Mann 
gained 10 yards on a fake kick, plant- 
ing the ball on the Aggie 15-yard line. 
In one tackle round combination and a 



straight buck by Hazel the ball was 
downed on the 3-yard mark and Home 
went through left tackle for a touch- 
down, 

Doane received Captain Walker's 
kick on the 10-yard line. Samson 
broke through and blockad Mann's 
punt. The second try was successful 
and the ball went to M. A, C. on the 
Springfield 40-yard mark. In the 
exchange of punts Samson again broke 
through and blocked Mann's kick, the 
ball going to M. A. C. After a for- 
ward pass which Samson muffed the 
ball went to the training school on 
downs on their own 35-yard line. 
Mann brought the ball to midfleld 
round left end. 

Hayden was knocked out and 
replaced by Griffin. From this point 
to the end of the quarter the ball see- 
sawed between the M. A. C. 6-yard 
line and the Springfield 25-yard mark. 
An onslde kick by Brewer was downed 
back of the Springfield line by Mann 
for a touch back. 

Hayden got into the scrimmage 
again at the opening of the second 
quarter. Training school netted 33 
yards on a play through skin tackle, a 
5-yard penalty, a long end run and a 
line buck by Hazel, getting first down 
on the M. A. C. 40-yard line. Mann 
then punted to Smith who made a fair 
catch on the 1 0-yard line. Williams 
reeled off eight yards through Uckle. 
Brewer added 12 more. Smith made 
a good gain round right end and Nlssen 
advanced eight through skin tackle and 
Brewer got a yard more after which he 
punted to the Training school 35 -yard 

line. 

Springfield got 20 yards In two plays 
and on the exchange of punts Mann 
got the ball on the M. A. C. 35-yard 
line and made a spectacular run back 
for a touchdown. The claim that he 
ran out of bounds on the three yard 
line was not allowed. Mann kicked 
the goal and the score stood 1 2-0. 

In the last fifteen seconds of the half 
Smith booted the ball between the 
posts from the 25 -yard line, having 
advanced the ball from the Training 
school 35-yard line on a 12-yard for- 
ward pass Brewer to Edgerton and on 
five and three yard gains by Nlssen 
and Brewer. 

In the third period Van Cleave 
replaced Mann and Springfield slowed 
up noticeably. The teams were evenly 
matched with M. A. C. fighting hard 
for another score. During the quarter 
the Training school tried the forward 
pass a number of times without suc- 
cess. Ceilings was ruled out of the 
game for rough play and replaced by 
Alatson. The oval never got beyond 
the 25-yard line on either side. The 
quarter ended with the ball on the 
Springfield 50-yard line. 

The last period was characterized 
by a good deal of rough play on both 
sides, by hard tackling and spectacular 
end running. At the very beginning 
Curran broke through and tackled the 
Springfield runner for a loss. An 



UP-TO-DATE 



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Elite Shoes, 
Swell Shod Shoes, 
Pumps the fit, - 



$3-50 to $5.00 

- $5.00 and $6.00 

$4.00 



EXPERT REPAIRING 



PAGE'S Shoe Store, 



BETWEEN THE BANKS 



HARRISON'S NURSERIES... 

Have over two thousand acres in Nursery Stock. 
They offer a book on 

HOW TO GROW AND MARKET FRUIT 

For 50 cents. 

All prospective buyers are invited to visit the 

Nursery. 

They are the largest growers of fruit trees in 

this country. 



Kodaks, 

Eastman Films, 

Victor Talking 
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Victor Records, 

Fountain 
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Leather Qoods. 




Ml 

PHOTOGRArnER 

The best workmanship, 

The latest styles, 

Reasonable prices 

Lincoln Building, Amherst, Matt. 



The Prospect House 



PERRY'S 



The place to eat after the game. 
Attractive tables and rooms. Excel- 
lent service. Catering a specialty. 



MRS. E. E. PERRY 



DEUEL^S 

DRUG STORE 



There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

GOAL 



or 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



jiE. N. PARISEAU.j* 

Barber J^ Shop 

RAZORS HONED 
No. 2 Ple«*«nt, St., Amheret, MaM. 



THE 



exchange of punts with the event fav- 
oring Springfield brought the ball to 
the Aggie five yard line. Brewer's 
kick was blocked. It was first down 
with the ball in Springfield's possess- 
ion on the five yard line. Training 
school fumbled and Brewer kicked safe 
to the 35 yard line, A place kick was 
attempted but failed. The ball 
changed hands, M. A. C. fumbled, 
and Sorlngfleld recovered on the 35 
yard line. Merner failed to gain round 
right end. Aggie having by this time 
sized up the Training School Interfer- 
ence, Maine punted to the twenty 
yard line. Nlssen advanced five yards 
and Williams four and Brewer punted 
to the center of the field. A couple 
of line kicks by Metzler and a success- 
ful forward pass brought the ball to the 
M. A. C. 25 yard line where the 
game ended. 



H 



Kir^iUMium Codies- 



>3tfiei| 



Hoover & Smith Co. 



616 Ch«tnot St.. Philadelphia 



Jewelers and Silversmiths, 



.Diamond Merchants. 



SPRINGPICLD. 

Merner, le 

Briggs. It 

Fradd, Deaver. Ig 

Gregory, c 

CoUinga. Watson, rg 

Swenson. rt 

Doane. re 

Mann. Van Cleave, qb 

Hazel, Ihb 

Home, rhb 



M A. C. 

re, Larson, Curran 
rt, Hayden. Griffin 
rg. Walker Capt 
c, Hubert 
Ig, Baker 
It, Samson 
le. Edgerton 
qb. Smith. Core 
rhb, Brewer 
Ihb, Ni&sen 
(b Williams 



PMIidilpMi's Offlefil Fntimlt! Jeweler 



•rSOIALISTS IN 

Fraternity Badges, Fobs. Novelties, 

Rings. Charms Priaas. Trophlaa 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Saals, 

Rings, Charms.*. 



Metzler. (capt..). fb 

Score -Springfield 12. Aggie 3. Touch- 
downs—Home. Mann. Goals from field- 
Smith. Referee — Cannell of Tufts. 
Umpire - Foley of Amherst Field judge- 
Carpenter of Harvard Head linesman— 
Delehanty of Springfield. Time— IS-min- 
ute periods 




Sanderson 

6f Thompson 

Mi 

AnnoBnccmcnt!! 

Our Fall and Winter Outfitting for 
students is now ready. You may 
confidently look to this store for the 
very latest fashions. 

Oiif PfW Never Prevent a Sale 

We want you to feel at perfect 
liberty to look as long and as often as 
you like without buying. 

This is the home of the Hart, 
Schafner & Marx clothes. 

Interwoven hose in all grades, 
aSC 35c and 50c. 

rhoentx silk ho.se, 50c. 

The Arrow Brand and H. « I. 
collars. 

Kverything you may need for your 
wardrobe at prices no one can under- 
sell. 



Sanderson 

&f Thompson 

Clotbiirs, Hitters, Tailors 



• • • • 



yO(/ WILL FIND 
A FULL LINE 
OF 



ito & ci 




TOBAOOO 



AT 



The College Drug Store 



C. R. ELDER 



CONCERT BY THE AMERICAM 
STRING QUARTETTE 

The first nnuslcal entertainment of 
the year was given In the Chapel, last 
Wednesday evening, by the American 
String Quartette of Medfleld. The 
concert was well attended by both stu- 
dents and faculty. They were well 
repaid, for this concert was undoubt- 
edly the best of Its kind which has 
ever been presented at M. A. C. 

The quartette Is composed of the 
following : First violin. Miss Gertrude 
Marshall; second violin, Miss Evelyn 
Street; viola, Miss Edith Jewell; 
vlolon-cello, Mrs. Susan Lord Bran- 
dcgee. The program: 
Quartette. 

For two violins, viola and violon- 
cello No. 13 In B flat major— Haydn. 

1 . Allegro com Spirito. 

2. Adagio. I 

3. Mlnuetio 

4. Allegro una non Xxop^. 
Solos for violin with strong accom- 
paniment. 

Canzonetta, Godard 

Andante Cantabile, Tschalkowsky 

Minuet, Mozart 

Prelude, Bach 

Miss Marshall. 

Quartette. 

For two violins, viola, and violon- 
cello, op. 13— Ippalitoffwanow. 

1 . Seuto allegro. 

2. Presto. 

3. Allegretto. 

4. Allegro rdsaluto. 



The WfiftTH v. COTRE LL and L EOHftRD 



FRANK H. DANFORTH. Moa. 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 



Makiri 

of 



, CAP A GOWNS 

I To the American Colleges from the At- 

Anlierit Comer In RtthskelUr. specialty. 



M. B. MAORATH &S01S 

Passenger and 



Toefil Mientka, 



Boot and Shoe Repairing, 
Baggage Transfer. « >°"« «» "*^ y" • ^="^ 



OrdwaMt at th« Amh«r»t Houtc will r«e«iT« 
prompt attention . 



Ar»-ala«jr»t;« 



AJCftMIS* 




Every man should give his head a thorough cleaning after the football 
season. Nothing better can be used than 

Rexall "93" Shampoo Paste 

It will remove the dirt from the scalp and leave the hair silky. 
Used in connection with 

"93" HAIR TONIC 

it will restore the growth of hair, prevent its falling out and keep the head 
free from scurf and dandruff. For sale only at 

Henry Adams & Co. 

Tlxe KK:XAIvIv store 



•\ 



The ColUge Signal, Tuesday. November 21, 1911. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 21. 19"- 



>'i 



I 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesdiy evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOABD OF BDIT0K8. 

ALDEN C. BRETT. 1912 Ednof-lii-ChW. 

R. H. VANZWALENBURC. '13. At»l»t«m Editor. 
JESSE CARPENTER. JR ,1912 Miiurlnf Editor. 
MARSHALL C.PRATT. 1912. Competition Editor 
ROYAL N. HALLOWELL. 1912. Athletics. 

JOSEPH A. HARLOW. 1912, Athletic*. 

OSCAR C. ANDERSON. 1913, Ahimni Notet 
SILAS WILLIAMS. 191?. D«p«rtment Notes. 

S. MILLER JORDAN. 1913, CeUage NfltM. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMKIfT. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912. Buslneee Meneger. 

CEO^CE ZABRISKIE. 1913 AMt. Bue. Manager 
ERNEST S. CLARK. JR., 1914. Circulation. 

CHESTER E. WHEELER. 1914. Circulation. 
STUART B. FOSTER. 1914, C'reutotloe. 



Subeerlptlon $1.50 per year. Single 
oepies, S cents. Make all orders payable to 
Albekt W. Dodos. 



Eirterad •» Moond-clai 
rm Offtee. 



maHer at the Amkent 



Vol. XXII. TUESDAY, NOV. 21. No. 10 

The football season has ended, and, 
though It ended with a defeat, the last 
game showed the real strength of the 
team. With the old Aggie spirit, 
they fought against great odds — 
against a team that had swept nearly 
everything before It. And what was 
responsible for this fighting splrir? 
Was It entirely the thoughts of rivalry 
between Springfield and this college, 
or the fact that the whole college was 
there to urge them on? Though these 
helped, they were not alone respon- 
sible, because the work of coaches 
must be taken into serious considera- 
tion. For the week preceding the 
game, in spite of adverse weather 
conditions, these determined men 
drilled it Into the boys that they must 
hold Springfield down and they did 
Therefore, let us not overlook, In 
praising the work of the team In that 
game, the Important part that the 
coaches played In the result of the 
game. 

CAMPUS CALENDAR 

tNoilces for this column should be dropped In the 
SioNAi- Office or handed to R. H. Vanzwalentawc 
' 1 3. oa or before the Saturday precedlnc each Issue. 

Nov. 21. 6-45 p. M. — South College, 
Stockbridgs Club. 

6-45 P. M. — Chem. Lab. — 
Chemistry Club. 

Nov. 22, 1-30 p. M.— Assembly. 

Nov. 23, 6-45 p. m.— Y. M. C. A. In 
Chapel. 

Nov. 25, 4-00 p. M. — Second Infor- 
mal in Drill Hall. 



COLLEGE NOTES 

Mr. Gore '13 has accepted the 
position of freshman head coach. 

Informal, Saturday, the 25th— turn 
out and do your share to help make It 
a success, 

George Mellcan of Worcester has 
been elected captain of the freshman 
football team. 

That field goal was a beauty— a 
slow, easy-going kick that just floated 
lazily over the cross-bar. 



With constant practice the college 
orchestra promises to be even more 
successful than last year. 

The first presentation of "What 
Happened to Jones" will be at 
Montague next Friday evening. 

Hockey practice Is being held In 
the Drill Hall every afternoon. The 
men are given work shooting goals, 

1915 held a smokeless "smoker" 
in the social Union Room last Tues- 
day evening after the mass meeting. 

The concert by the American String 
Quartette was well attended, Wednes- 
day evening, the chapel being almost 
filled. 

A good, clean-cut game from start 
to finish— well worth seeing. That 
was the general opinion of the Spring- 
field game. 

The Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology defeated Brown's Cross- 
country team 40-45 In their annual 
cross-country run. 

Among those around campus for 
the Springfield battle were Adams, 
Bentley, Johnson, Piper and Burn- 
ham '11 and Neale '09. 

Dr. and Mrs. Chamberlain enter- 
tained a few members of the Junior 
chemistry class last Friday evening at 
their home on North Pro^ct St. 

Owing to the stormy weather, the 
regiment made no attempt to surround 
and capture the reservoir on top of 
Mt. Pleasant on Wednesday afternoon. 

Professor and Mrs. Gordon gave a 
reception at their home on Nutting 
Avenue to the members of the Junior 
Zoology class last Thursday evening. 

The end of the fraternity rushing 
season at Monday morning chapel 
gives many freshmen and upperclass- 
men a much needed opportunity to 
"hit the books." 

The ladles of the faculty will enter- 
tain the students of the college In the 
drill hall Friday evening, Nov. 24th. 
All are cordially Invited to attend this 
Informal reception. 

Freshman and sophomore football 
practice goes on steadily and from all 
indications a good scrappy game will 
be put up. Contrary to general opin- 
ion, 1914 will have no walk-over. 

After Saturday's game the sopho- 
mores made merry at the Henking 
with their first class smoker. Among 
those present was President Buiter- 
fleld. '14 has taken as Its motto, 
"Boost old Aggie and 1914." 

Dramatic rehearsals are being held 
practically every night now, in prepar- 
ation for the first appearance at Mon- 
tague Friday night. The cast Is 
well balanced and gives promise of an 
exceptionally good production. 

Three well attended mass meetings 
were held In preparation for the 
Springfield game the past week. It Is 
time, however, for the freshmen to 
turn out for these meetings and see 
that more than half of their class Is 
present. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Dally and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



EW ELL'S 




It's a good thing not to worry about 
your pedal apparel, its correct, style 
comfort or durability. 

Buy your shoes from 

Tliii Shop ThaUlas The Style 

" Walk Over," Haywood Shoes, 

$3.50, I4.00, I5.00 



BoUes " Special, " Stetson Shoes, 
95.00 to $8.00 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 



REPAIRINO DEPARTMENT 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Next to Corner Drug Store. 



Angier, '13. 



Clark, '13. 



AND 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



We have a full line of Banners, Host 
Cards, College Songs, Seal Papers, Foun- 
tain Pena, Candy, Tonic and Student 
Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

BASEMENT OP NO. COLLEGE 



Eldridge, '14. 



Tarbell, '14. 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Block 
Amherst, Mass. 



C^^rptn-ler & Morehoust, 

PRINTERS, 



No I, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



H. E. KINSMAN, 

Colkge Pbotograpber 

NASH BLOCK, MAIN ST., 
AMHERST, MASS. 

High-grade artistic work. Perfect satisfaction guaranteed. 

Studio newly equipped with large sky light 

and special lense for large 

groups. 

All styles the latest. Fine picture framing. 



SUNDAY CHAPEL 

[Conrtnu»d from [wg« 1 •! 



buryport; and Granville W. Thayer of 
Pembroke. 

I. M.».o 1 Theta Phi— S. D. Clark of North 

„n,ir communit es on your shoulders. ' "^'^ '^'" '^' ^ , »., . 

Cebody is going to dropout of the Amherst; Paul B. Eaton of Wake- 
'rand hi place you wll^^^^ Gerald Falesof Worcester; 

: , T uestionls. A. J- ^^-'^«- ^^ Westhampton ; 

Ob 'prepared? It Is not only a privll- , Chester H. Norton of Chelsea ; Ray- 
to tje prep- . . , ,„ ^hcolnt*. mon E. Rendall of Melrose ; Lincoln 

ege to be prepared ^^"^ ^ J^^^"^ ^ ^ gcott of Melrose; Ph.l.p F. Whit- 
duty. Time never turns back; there | «_ ^^ ^..„,,,,,,, . ,„d Elvln S. 



Is no such thing as the returning year, 
therefore, you must seize your oppor- 
tunities when they appear. Those 
to whom much Is given much is re- 
quired of. Increasing complexity of life 
places more -responsibility on the men 
of the present and the future than ever 
was placed on men of the past. 

The men who are called on are the 
men who are prepared. Things don't 
come prepared. This is shown In the 
stories of the Bible. Mose? was cal- 
led upon to lead the Israelites because 
he was prepared. David slew Goliath, 
not through a miracle, but because he 
was prepared. The same Is true of 
Paul and in our own history of George 
Washington and Abraham Lincoln. 
The men you follow In college activi- 
ties and m all lines of life are the ones 
who are prepared. 

Three things a man must have. 

The first Is something you must 

get at college. You have got to 

have a good physique to g-^t the 

best out of this life. Take care of 

your body, as the temple of God. 

You must enlarge and stimulate your 

mental powers. You must be able to 

distinguish between right and wrong, 

wherever you may be. Take jesus 

Christ into your life. Being thus pre- 

pered you will find that when you are 

called for in life you will enter In. 



more of Sunderland ; 
Wright of Worcester. I 

Kappa Gai^ma Phi— Alpha J. Fie- 
but of Amherst; Daniel J. Fitzgerald 
of Worcester ; Paul V. Kane of Wor- 
cester ; Harold B. Mahan of Hlng- 
ham Center; Ray F. McKechnie of 
Natlck; Chester P. Spofford of 
Georgetown; and George B. Ray of 
Hingham. 

Sigma Tau Delta— Donald H. 
Cande of Plttsfield; Clayton M. 
Hagar of Somerviile ; Willis H. Has- 
kell of Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Joseph S. 
Pike. Jr. of Somerviile ; Maxwell B. 
Saben of Leominster ; and Alfred E. 
Wllklns of Wakefield. 

Beta Kappa Phi.— Gladstone H. 
Cale of West Springfield; Sumner A. 
Dole of Bardweli's Ferry; William L. 
Doran of North Dartmouth ; Roder- 
ick C. Hall of Worcester; George 
F. Hyde of North Dana ; FrankUn W. 
Marsh of Dorchester ; Ernest B. 
Parmenterof Dover, Lester W. Tarr 
of Lanesville ; and Henry H. White 
of West Peabody. 



EVERY STUDENT 

Taking agricultural chemistry should keep uj) with 
preseiit developments as well as grounding himself in 
piinciples. We wish every student would send us a 
postal card request for Mr. Bowker's latest circular 



treating of 



AVAILABLE SULPHUR 
IN ACID PHOSPHATE 

It 1.^ A '♦Live" Subject. Thk Circular Is Krkk 
" S/iti/y the riant Food Problem " 

UfWUVVH Fertilizer Company 

DU U IVIjIi 43 Chatham St. Boston 



I 



"BOOST OLD AGGIE" 

[Continued from page U 



F. A. SHEPARD 

MEN'S STORE 

Kuppentieimcr's 
- Fine Clothes 



RUSHING SEASON ENDS 

[ConttMMd fr'^lftf^ 1 1 

Sunderland. 

Phi Sigma Kappa— Herbert H. 
Archibald of Waltham ; Earle F. 
Balrd of Waltham ; John C. Callard 
ofWinthrop; Gardner M. Brooks of 
Newton; Leonard 0. Fisher of Nor- 
wood ; Raymond B. Griggs of Chic- 
opee Falls; Paul H. Hlldreth of New- 
tonvUle; Perley B. Jordan of Tops- 
field; J. Albert Pierce of New York 
city ; Langdon Prouty of Littleton ; 
Albert J. T. Tonry of Wlnthrop. 

C. S. C.— Chester A. Bishop of 
Peterboro, N. H.: Herbert W. 
Bishop of Doylestown, Pa.; Arthur 
L. Clark of Jamaica Plain; Earle S. 
Draper of Milford ; Arthur R. Hough- 
ton of South Lancaster; Carl D. 



abatement of enthusiasm, and the 
dinner was marked by a spirit of loy- 
alty and optimism for the college and 
Its future. The dinner was served at 
6 o'clock, and while it was In progress 
music was furnished In the form of 
several popular selections by the 
Massachusetts agricultural college 
orchestra. Songs were sung to the 
accompaniment of the orchestra In 
honor of the college, among them 
••Fight on to Victory" and "Hail. 
Hall, Massachusetts." Before the 
speechmaking began, the 1914 class 
song was sung. 

The toastmaster was Stanley Bar- 
ron Freeborn, president of the class. 
He first called on President Butter- 
field, who responded to the toast: 
"Is our college progressive?" Presi- 
dent Butterfleld began by speaking of 
the days when a man was ashamed to 
admit that he c^me from, an agricul- 
tural college, and when the term 
"Aggie" was used as a contemptuous 
nickname. He said that all "Aggie" 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the French Shoe 




CUSTOM TAILORING A SPECIUTY 

Thoma.s IIemenwav, '12. M. A. C Representative 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, iRd PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



Mobergof Campello: Eldon S. Mo ._ 

berg of Campello; Ralph E. Phillips I men now were glad to own the nick- 

of Mendon ; Edwin C. Towne of I name, for from being a term of deris- 



Waltham ; and Donald Williams of 
Catasauqua, Pa. 

Kappa Sigma— 1914, Harold E 



ion it had become one of honor.. He 
spoke of the remarkable growth of 
agricultural colleges throughout the 



Black^ Worcester; I9I5, Stuart K.| country, and particularly in the West 



Farrar of Springfield; Malcolm N 



In Kansas, Minnesota, Oregon, and the 



rarrar 01 ov>riii8Mciu, i"— — - , , 

Goodwin of Newburyport; LeRoy E. states of that section, h« J^^'^' J^^ 
Hasklnsof Taunton; Isaac Hathaway agricultural departments of the univer- 



of Kingston; Clayton P. Howes of 
North Dartmouth ; Daniel J. Lewis of 
Hanson; Harold G. Little of New- 



slties have grown from being the least 
important parts of the institutions to 
the point of being in many cases the 



ABIHERST BOOK STOR| 

parks] 

FLORIST, 

Flowers for all occcasions. 

Mail or telephone orders given 
prompt attention. 

239 Main St., Northmptoii 

If you are getting the 
THE MOST FOR TOUR MONBY 

then you are eating at the 

O. K., N"T TO POST OFFICE 

J. W. KOUWK, Prop. 

Have you tried our 25-cent Dinners .> 
If not, why not? 



DUDLEY 

OUTFITTER IN 

Fine Athletic Goods 

FOR EVERY SPORT 




"Tmc Dest In Tut Worlo' 
Write for cataloge. 



Clarliis H. Dumey 

HANOVER, - • N. H. 

Agent, IIAZEN *14 



The College Signal. Tuesday. November 21, 1911. 



The College Signal, Tuesday. November 21, i9»^- 



GOODS FOR MEN. 

C. & K. Derbys, 
Keiser Cravats, 

^ English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 




Highest Grade Roses 

We are offering to our local patrons, selection from our large 
stock of finest Roses, especially grown for the Nkw York and IJosmN 
FiowKR Markki^. 

THE MONTGOMERY CO., Inc., 

HADLEiy, MASS. 

TELEPHONES. 

Amherst. i96-R. 



Northampton. 660. 



WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 

In so far as our benefits are mutual. 

THE AMHERST GAS COMPANY 

Everything Electrical 



Scbool and College pbotographcrs . . . 




/ r\r*Al I Y' \i Center St.. Northampton, Mass.. 
L.\j\^f\L.L.r. 3 ^^^ g^^^j^ Hadley. Mass. 

These Studios offer the l>est skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



Main Office: 

1546-1548 Broadway. 

New York City 



As I Mn fllrertW connectc«l with • Whote»«le 
Houite, 1 can 

SAVE YOU MONEY ON CLOTHES 

will be pl««»te«l to show fMinpl«B •!>•« fttyleti of 
Winter »aJt« •ml 0»ereo«w. 

H. H. WHITK, I9I«. Hnnti Block 

Up ob« night 



STEAM KITTING. Telephone §9-4- 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 



If 70U wnnt to he 

MtH.IO WITH THK tJIKI.H 

yon mum hiivr yoiinlolhcs (ires «■.! ami fU nncil 

AT BPSTBIirS 

11 Amity '^l. Maroon Store 



PreaslDK "nd Cle«nlnf « •p^eUliy 

Mont liberal ticket *yt<teni In town 



largest of all the division. In one of 
the most important, the agricultural 
department numb3rs one-quarter of 
the total registration ol the university. 
I The class of men who are coming to 
I the agricultural colleges has been 
! improving and from a time when they 
were getting the untrained men of the 
country they have come to a period 
when they are getting the best men 
from the colleges. This is because 
agriculture is coming into its cwn ; 
and is being recognized as one of the 
most important of the occupations that 
a man can taite up, as well as one of 
the most necessary. It is coming to 
be an occupation which appeals to the 
biggest and brainiest and most public 
spirited men equally with other lines 
of public service. 

The reputation of the Massachu- 
setts agricultural college has been 
improving steadily, he said. He 
repeated a conversation which he 
chancfd to overhear between a couple 
of Springfield men at yesterday's 
game, spealting in pr.Jise of tne insti- 
tution and the useful type of men it is 
lurnlng out. With more and br.tier 
men coming for training every year, 
he said, and with a body of professors 
and students who are working in unison 
to "boost old 'Aggie* " and the great 
ileld of work for which it trains men, 
there can be no doubt that the college 
is progressing. The thing lor the 
present members to do is to preserve 
that spirit, and pass it on to their 
iuccessors. 

Ricnard Pj*crs thtn spjke on 
"Class spit it." and emphasized the 
need of iceeping up class spirit as the 
only basis on which the college spirit 
can be preserved. Other toasts were 
responded to with speeches. "Ath 
letics" being represented by John G. 
Hutchinson. "Girls, girls, girls," 
giving a free and unlimited field for 
speculation for Harold Brewer, and 
"1914" was the subject for Harold 
A. Payne. The subjects given served 
in most cases as mere starting points 
from which to lay an oratorical course 
for the ttiems of universal appeal, 
"boost old 'Aggie'." Impromptu 
toasts were given by D. W. Jones, 
L. E. Smith, the members of the 
football team and Harold Morse cap- 
tain of last year's freshman baseball 
team. After this the banquet broke 
up with a final song and cheer. The 
committee in charge of the affair was 
Edward Clinton Edwards, chairman, 
I Leon Edgar Smith, and Robert Tneo- 
i dore Frost. 



MRS. LINCOLN WELLS I 

WILL HOLD A 



CHRISTMAS SALE 



-AT- 



Ye Male Stop andTeaBooDi 

OLD DEERFIELO 

FROM 

DECEMBER 4 TO 9.1911 

FOR FARMS ! 

Big. Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building l^ots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W. R BROWN 

Savings Bank Bl'k, 

Amherst, • Mas*. 



E.B DICKINSON D.D.S. 

Williams Block, Amhkrst, Mass. 
Orrit ■ Hours: 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundm 

Hi }^h Grade College Work 
LAUNDRY 



.Shins. 
Collars, 
Cuffs. - 
Plain wash. 
Same, rough dry. 



ID i5C 

2C 
JC 

40c per doz 
250 per do/.. 



Ralph K Parker, agent. C. S. C. Housf, 

85 Pleasant .St. 

Francis S. Madison, agent lor 1915 an<1 

short course. \'et. Lab. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 
Fred S. Merrill, agent, C. S. C. House, 

85 I'leasant St. 
Put full name aiul addrcsa on laundry 



IWriglit&Ditsoo 



SATURDAY'S FOOTBALL 
SCORES. 



m.d.qilman. ca Morrrr. 

TELEPHONE 1079-3. 



CHftRLES DftNCE & SON. I ,L„j^ and MOFFET. 



PLUMBERS. 



Specialty of RepairinK 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead LuiHTS, &c. 
* Clifton Ave., AMHKRST. MASS 



Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 

CONFECTIONERY. 

tOTtoSII Maim Stkekt. 

Worcester, Mass. 



H arvard 5 
Princeton 6 
Williams 8 
Brown 6 
Navy 

Syracuse 1 2 
Yale 1915 
Trinity 24 
Chicago 6 
Michigan 1 1 



Dartmouth 3 

Yale 3 

Amherst 

Vermont 

Penn. State 

Carlisle 6 
Harvard 1915 

Haverford 6 

Cornell 

U. of Penn. 9 



Heidquirtin 
for 



Athletic Supplies 



?,^^„"i":Uu Colliia StadMti 
^,tke. Ban an«i Athletes who 
want the real, si* 
perlor articles for 
the lartous sports 
should Insist upon 
those hearing the 
Wright & Ditson 
Trade Mark 



Foot Ball 
Hockey 
Track and 
Field Sport* 




• . VAT. er> 




Catalogue Free 

Wright & Ditson 

334 Washington St. 
Boston 

SiiFranclseo ^ ..J 
Proildenci Cwbrldrt 



Conn. Vallej 81 Rj. Lines 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



LANDSCAPE ART CLUB. 

Professor Arthur K. Harrison will 
speak to-night to the members of the 
club on "The Machinery of Land- 
scape Architecture. The inside 
workings of a landscape office'" in 
French Hall at 7-00 o'clock. Mr. 
Harrison has had a wide experience in 
running landscape offices and thor- 
oughly understands the different meth- 
ods and workings In the offce. He 
is also a very strong speaker on the 
subject and all those interested in this 
work should avail themselves of this 
excellent opportunity to hear Mr. Harri- 
son's views on his topic of the evening. 

CHEMISTRY CLUB. 

Dr. Charles A. Peters '97 will 
speak to-night on the '-Work and 
Organization of Prof. Emil Fisher's 
laboratory in Berlin, "in the Chemistry 
building af 7-00 o'clock sharp. 

Y> n> L. A. 

Gregory, of Springfield Training 
School, center ot the football team, 
spoke at the meeting Thursday even- 
ing. His subject was "The Relation 
of Religion to Physical Life." 

1913 INDEX. 

Coming within two or three weeks. 
'Twill soothe, cheer and delight. Be- 
gin to lay by that one and three quarters 
bones In preparation for the one big day. 
DUE DEC. 5th. 




THK 
SMOOTHEST TOBACCO 






v€^ 




Mill 1^^' 



« ll^" 




Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
Iral department. The new green- 
t)use5 are now producing first class 
aterial and we have excellent roses, 
Lrnations.violets and chysanthemums 
their season. Telephone or leave 
Lur orders at the office in French 
[all. These will receive prompt 
lid careful attention. Liberal dis^ 
kunt on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



A touching and pathetic scene took 
place last week when Jordan was 
evicted from his room in South. 
With the aid of his admiring and 
sympathizing friends his household 
"goods and chattels" were strewn 
broadcast in front of the dorm. When 
last seen he was trying to re-enter by 
way of the fire escape amid a gener- 
ous shower of bouquets. 



Full Two 
Ounce Tiiu 



10 



•XHE greatest joy that follows Ac 
A hardships of training, is the moment 
that you can heap the briar bowl with 
good old VelveL Superb leaf— the 
lenderest leaf — aged over two ycara— 
perfect maturity — disappearance of all 
leaf harshness— leaving that rare degree of 
mellowness — superb flavor— the smooth- 
ness so enjoyable. Velvet is free from 
all harshness. Smoke Velvet as of^en as 
you like, always cool burning — "good 
old stuHr At all dealers. 

SPAULDING & MERRICiC 

CHICAGO 



OODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

S7 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

•04.— John W. Gregg, assistant in 
horticulture. Pennsylvania State 
College. 

'09.- Luther G. Willis, assistant 
chemist at Pennsylvania Experiment 
Station. 

'10.— Ralph A. Waldron, assistant 
In botany, Pennsylvania State College. 

'Il_ J. F. Adams and C. A. 

Smith are assistant instructors at the 
Pennsylvania State College. 

'11.- A. P. Burseley is with the 
Cape Cod Construction Co. working 
on the Cape Cod canal. His address 
is West Barnstable. 



Orchards P«y BetUr Than GoM Mine. When Fertlil«ed With 

GENUINE THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER! 

TI-. Ma«achu«tt. Stat. Board of Agriculture Offered a Prize f.* the Mott Vu^MMb Aef.ol 
The M"«chu«tU StaU^ orchard,. Thi. Coaft Has Recently Closed, and .he 



PRIZE IS WON BV THB OREW-MUNSON FRUIT CO.. of Lttttoton. 
Their Prlie Winning Acre o« Baldwin Apples 
GAVE THEM A TOTAL RETURN OP »71..7»-THE NET PROFIT WA. .....•• 



Jgi'V?fi?,li"KlV,16E|HI«E TmimiS PHOSPHITE WWDEI^J mk.kat.e,pf 



iooo LBS. PER ACRE 



rh« K.ll.wng Letter Prom ll.rn.s Brothers, the Famous Fruit Grower, and Orchardi.ts of 

YalSUrme. Conn.. Shows That Thomas Phosphate Powder Br.ngs a Prue to 

Every User in the Form of a Irolitable Crop : 



JUNCHES 

SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



^ted only from 1 A. M. to 4 A. M. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE NOTES 

Kansas City is planning a great uni- 
versity, to be to that city what 
Chicago university is to Chicago. A 
charter has been obtained and large 
endowments have already been 
received. This is the beginning of a 
movement for an endowment of 
$3,000,000, the incorporators say. 



The Coh Mortimer Companv, 

'""'"iJrr^Ka^d to Thomas Pho,phaUPo.vder, 
you will recall that we bought of Vou last year 
Watons and w.- wish to say that it uave us most 

e^ciuenf results. On ""' P*«'' '"'^'jfv'*™;! 
weusra it the trees made a stlfniM frowlh 
7,lhheav^darkrreen/ol,afe. the frutt was of 
excellent color, and the keefifng'qualttut were re- 



markaH*. whiek was a bif aJvaHtare.<t*V*^ 
ly when we had over \V>cart to Man-est in atoni 
/w>0 BKf*** as we had this year. .«>*/.,. 

iVe never saw tetter rolored Baldwin Af>PI*t 
iknm those ve rrew where we applied a goM 
dressing of T^oma. Phosphate Kwder. The 
best sold at retail for lo.oo per barrel. 

Yourt truly. _ 

Barnes Brothrri. 



THERE IS A TRUTH IN ALL THIS FOR YOU I 

The whole story is told in the New Kdltion of our Booklet. 'Up- To- Date 
Fruit Growing," which is sent free If you mention THE College SiOMAt. 

The Coe-Mortimer Co„^^^-^\'As 5 1 Chamber St.. N. Y. City 

Wealsodistributefrom BOSTON. MAM.; B.trA.T. Ma.he; »*•-;•»•«««• 

MD.; PH.LA.. PA.: NORrOLE. VA.; savannah, GA.: CHARI.RTON. h. C. 



1 i ' 



8 



PI. J. Lapone, idc. 



Proprietors of 



Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 

Tel. 183. 




ASK YOUR 

STATIONER 

FOR 

Ward's Fountain I'en.s, Fine Papers 
and Knvelopes. Students' Supplies. 
Send for samples of Kngraved Invita- 
tions, Class and Fraternity Paper, 
Banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, etc. 

SAMUEL WARD CO. 

5763 Franklin Street 
BOSTON 



WHBD'S 



All Styles of 



SWEATERS 
AND JERSEYS 






TRADE 







MARK 



^^^yt--^- 



Compute Line of 



The CoUefc Signal, Tuesday, November ai. 191 1. 



H 



Massachusetts Asricultural Wm 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Trains men for attractive positions in vocations 
that are not overcrowded. 

Tuition is free to residents of Massachusetts. 

Necessary expenses are moderate. 

A CATALOG WILL BE SENT ON REQUEST 



Violin, Banlo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strlngi 

LKNS GRINDING 

Full iine of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, PRESIDENT 

AMHERST. MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Twelve index, 

Nineteen Hundred Thirteen index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbrldge Club, 

Rifle Club. 

Dramatic Soc'e^y- 

Debating Society. 

Public Speaking Council, 



Athletic Goods 
and BANNERS 

17 South College 



H. C. Walker, President 
Geo. H. Chapman, Secretary 
C. C. Pearson, Manager 
R. J. Borden. Manager 
R. T. Beers. Manager 
H H. Wood, Manager 
S. M. Jordan, Manager 
F. A. Castle, Manager 
O. G. Anderson. Manager 
F. S. Madison, President 
L. S. Caldwell. President 
J D. French, Manager 
W. J. Weaver. President 
A. F. McDougall, President 
W. J. Blrdsall. President 
J. M. Heald. President 
T. J. Moreau, President 



PROMINENCE 

Is given here to the fact that we take 

special care in the posing of 

subjects in order to bring 

out all the good 

features. 

Light and shade is skilfully diffused 

This and the excellent finish makes 

our PHOTOGRAPHS masterpieces 

of reproductive art. 

SHILURE'S STUDIO. 

142MilnSt., Nortliwipliil 

F. c. plumb| 

Barber Shop 



All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



Mlhen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables. 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



AMHERST, MASS. 

m TERPSY PARLOR 

CLCANSINO. 

PRESSING, 

REPAIRING. 



Oulckeat >»«.rvlc«, B«.»t Work. Lowest Frl« 

All woik carefully done Work called for anc 
delivered. Gents' overcoats, .uit*. Dants »r^ 
coatf. Indies' tine linen »uit« a spec 



Wn. FRANKLYN. Prop. 



Rear Nash Bl'k, Amherst. 



Tel. No. Hit 



CARS 




JACKSON &- CUTLER 



It is but a short time before Christ- 
mas. What could be better than a 
gift of a pair of Moccasins, Moc 
casin Cruisers or Indoor Moccasins? 
TivlraSc It o-ver- tliien m*»i» 

WOOLLEY '14 

Winter Boots and Moccasins 
Indoor Moccasins 

COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 

Custom Work 

Holland's Block. Phoenix Row 



Telephone Connection 

TAILOR AND PRESSER 

Fall and Winter Suits 

Chevrons and Stripes 

Put on Military Suits 

Full Dress Suits to Rent 

Gents' Furnishings 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

NIFORM 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 



HE 



COLLEGE SIGN^ 

MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURALO^LUEGE^ 




o d : 



Vol. XXII. 




JACOB REED'S SONS, 

Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

I4a4.i426 Chestnut St.. Philadelphia, Pa. 



Leave AGGIE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AGGIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mlm. pa»t ewi 
HOUR. 

SpMtal C«r» at Reasonable Rat*a 

mm i SUNDERLAND ST. Bt. CO] 
THE NEW ENGLAND NEWSPIiPEl| 

All the news and the Truth 
about it, in the :: '•• 

Springfield Republicail 



Massachusetts Agricultural Collepj 
News fully reported. 

BEST SPORTING PAGES 

The Weekly Republican will be sent 
free for one month to anyone 
wishing to try it , 

Daily, %8. Sunday, U- fVeeiljf,i'\ 



[srr 2' 



191 1 Football Squad 



1913 INDEX 



Will be l.mued Next Week. Over 300 
Photographs. 

Places of safe retreat are now being 
feverishly hunted by the unhappy Mex 
editors in anticipation of the annual 
publication of the Junior book. Red 
retribution will stalk through the land 
as soon as outraged undergraduates 
scan the pages. Seniors. Sophomores, 
and Freshmen wlH "get theirs" in 
heartless doses and Juniors especially, 
whose obituaries appear, are cautioned 
not to carry conce. led weapons for the 
next few weeks. 

Don't buy this book! Read some 
other person's. Otherwise some day 
the heirs of your line may "tumble" 
to just what manner of man you were 
in college. The ambition of the 
board, is, of course, to lose all they 
can on the volume, so don't buy one ! 

An Index rush will be held the day 
the book is put on sale. Watch post- 
ers for further information. 

Cornell won the annual intercolle- 
giate cross-country run by the low 
score of 48. The scores of the other 
college teams entered were: Cornell 
48, Harvard 58, Pennsylvania 123, 
Dartmouth 127, M. I. T. 129. Yale 
154. Syracuse 156, Brown 168, 
Princeton 206, Columbia 332. 



HOCKEY SCHEDULE 

Ten G«n.e. on the Li.t. Yale and 
West Point to be Played. 



Manager Howard H. Wood of the 
hockey team announces the following 
schedule for the coming season : 
Dec. 6, B. A. A. at Boston Ar^na 
9, Conn. Aggies at Amherst. 
13*, S. T. S. at Springfeld. 
Jan. 6, R. P. 1. at Troy. 

13. Williams at WIlHamstown. 
17, S. T. S. at Amherst. 
20! Amherst at Pratt Rink. 
24, Yale at New Haven. 
27, Trinity at Hartford. 
Feb. 10, West Po.nt at West Point. 
There Is also a possibility of procur- 
ing dates with Dartmouth and Cornell. 
The Dartmouth game, If arranged, 
will be at the Boston Arena Dec. 23d. 



ASSEMBLY 

Prof J. W. Crook of Amherst Col- 
lege was the speaker at Wednesday's 
assembly. He spoke upon the sub- 
ject "Surplus" and the general trend 
of his address was as follows: 

The economic condition of surplus 
is a comparatively recent thing In the 
history of the world. In the ancient 
day man laid nothing by. but lived 
from day to day with no thought nor 
preparation for the morrow. On the 



other hand nearly every mark of our 
modern civilization Is a form of sur- 
plus. But how did this surplus come 
about? Tnere were many causes but 
two were of fundamental importance. 
The first of these Is slavery. In 
the earliest time victims captured m 
war were slaughtered because to )ietp 
tnem and arm them for hunting was 
dangerous. Later it became custom- 
ary for the victims of war to be forced 
to work for their masters. Thus was 
slavery Introduced. This was essen- 
tially a step upward in civilization be- 
cause It gave the master leisurr. thus 
making surplus possible. 

The second cause was the introduc- 
tion of variety In consumption. Vari- 
ety tends, tnrough personal wants to 
increase the total utility of an article 
I to its maximum utiUty. Consump- 
tion without variety will be greater 
than with It. We would lessen con 
sumption if we would learn to consume 
in common. This surplus with which 
I we are dealing has come to be largely 
I controlled by a few members of the 
'community. How this is owned and 
' controlled is another story which can- 
i not be dealt with at this time. 



DRAMATICS OUTLOOK 

Play Selected for Presentation this Sea- 
son. The Cast. 



j Mr. McKimmle as trek-master led 
i a body of Metawampe devotees on a 
' hike to Mt. Norwottuck on Saturday 
1 afternoon. 



Last Friday evening the Dramatic 

society pres-^nted George Bradhursfs 

comedy 'What Happened to Jones" 

before a crowded house in Montague. 

The play was well received and was a 

success in every way. 

This year's cast IS a well balanced 
one and the production Is. without 
question, far superior to the exceller t 
one of last year. Wilde as Jones, 
an up-to-the-minute hymn-book drum- 
mer whose impersonation of the bishop 
of Bailarat makes the plot possible, 
had the audience In a roar every min- 
ute. Hills w^s splendid as Mrs. Ebe- 
nezer Goodly and the past of her hen- 
pecked husband was carried well by 
Moore. Moir showed up well as ire 
unfortunate bishop who Is mistaken for 
a maniac and for a follower of the 
pugilistic game all m one short even- 
ing. Jordan '13, Gray and D. J. 
Lewis did well In the difficult feminine 
roles of Cissy, Marjorie and Minerva. 
Alvlna Starlight, the elderly spinster in 
love with the bishop, was portrayed in 
realistic manner by Hyland, and Glbbs 
'15 had all the mannerisms of Helma. 
a Swedish servant girl, down to a T. 
The character of young Richard 



1 



t i 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 28, 1911. 



The rnllrff- «^'f"-' Tuaadav. November 28. .91 »■ 



Heatherly was well tended to by Read 
'14 and Whidden did good work as 
"double-up" man on the parts of 
sanatorium superintendent and of 
policeman. "Heiny" Allen '13 made 
every possible use of the comic scenes 
of Blgbee a harmless lunatic who 
imagines himself a redskin on the war- 
path. Between the acts Allen kept 
the house in good humor with his mel- 
odramaiic-comedy monolog. 
The cast was as follows : 

Jones. Who travels for a hymn book house, 

Wilde 12 
Ebenezer Goodly, Professor of anatomy, 

Moore '15 
Antony Goodly, D. D.. Bishop of Ballarat, 

Moir '13 
Thomas Holder, A policeman, Whidden "14 
Richard Heatherly, Engaged to Marjorie, 

Read 14 
William Bigbee, An inmate of the san- 
atorium, Whidden '14 
Mrs. Goodly, Ebenezer's wife. Hills ' 12 
Cissy, Ebenezer's ward, Jordan '13 

|;j*''j°^*«' ! Ebeneser's daughters,p't^ .';? 
Minerva, S Lewis 15 

Alvina Starlight, Mrs. Coodly's sister. 

Hyland '13 

Helma, Swedish servant girl. Gibbs'lS 



Thus It seems that dramatics has 
secured a permanent and sure foothold 
here at M. A, C. Every student, 
faculty member or employee of the 
college should support the society by 
attending the Northampton perform- 
ance, Feb. I5th. There is no reason 
why we should not fill the Academy of 
Music on that date and It certainly 
cannot be said that the dramatic club 
is unworthy of this support. The 
morning following that performance 
there will not be a man In college who 
can with autliorlty contradict the state- 
ment that "Old Aggie" has taken 
another step toward that high ideal 
which Is waiting in the not far distant 
future. 



Too much cannot be said of the 
wonderful development of the M. A. 
C. Dramatic Society. Starting less 
than two years ago with a small mem- 
bership, the club has risen to the 
present standard of any college dra- 
matic association In the country. 
This is merely another proof of the 
fact that M. A. C. Is capable of hold- 
ing her own with the best institutions 
of New England. 

The play selected this year, "What 
Happened to Jones" is a comedy 
which needs no introduction. It is 
the product of that famous playwrite, 
George Broadhurst and reflects 
throughout his captivating style. The 
humor is subtle not none the less ap- 
preciable and the situations lead from 
one to another In a most natural 
manner. The play Is of a professional 
type from the word "go," the usual 
amateurish atrocities in the shape of 
melodramatic scenes and rural sim- 
plicity are conspicuous by their ab- 
sence. 

Without an unusually capable cast 
such a vehicle would fall absolutely 
flat. The coming season's cast is, 
however, exceedingly unusual, being 
thoroughly coached and well balanced. 
The work of E. 1. Wilde In the per- 
formance at Montague last Friday 
evening was superb. No professional 
actor could have shown better knowl- 
edge of stagecraft and the eecentrici- 
ties of an audience. His delivery was 
excellent and his stage business was 
carried on with an assurance that 
comes only with mastery of the art. 
The supporting cast showed up equally 
well. The girls were stunning In their 
fashionable gowns and their feminine 
mannerism. The work of Jordan, 
Hills. Hyland and Gray as such was 
highly commendable and the men tak- 
ing the male parts were exceptionally 
good. 



MEETING OF M. A. C. MEN AT 
COLUMBUS 

While the American Association of 
Agricultural Colleges and Experiment 
Stations was in session at Columbus, 
Ohlo.an Informal gathering of M.A.C. 
men was held at the Onio University 
College Union on Nov. I6ih. Presi- 
dent Butterfleld was the speaker of 
the evening and gave an Interesting 
account of the College as It is today, 
a topic of especial Interest to those 
present who do not often have an 
opportunity to vist their Alma Mater 
and who find It difficult to realize the 
rapid strides that M. A. C. has been 
making during the past few years. 

A full list of those present is given 
below, together with the position held 
by each. A perusal of this list must 
impress one with the importance of 
the part that M. A. C. men are taking 
in agricultural education. Dr Wln- 
throp E. Stone '82 is president of the 
American Association of Agricultural 
Colleges and Experiment Stations for 
the ensuing year. 
Those present were; 
Faculty and Station — President 
Butterfleld, Professor Hurd, Professor 
Brooks '75, F. W. Morse, P. H. 
Smith '97. 

Alumni— Arthur A. Brlgham '78, 
principal South Dakota School of Agri- 
culture ; Joseph L. Hills '81, dean 
Department of Agriculture. University 
of Vermont and director Vermont 
Experiment Station; Charles S. 
Plumb '82, professor of Animal Hus- 
bandry, Ohio State University ; Win- 
throp E. Stone '82, president Pur- 
due University; Charles H. Preston 
'83, trustee M. A, C. ; Homer J. 
Wheeler '83, director Rhode Island 
Experiment Station ; Fred S. Cooley 
'88, supervisor Farmers' Institutes for 
State of Montana; George A. Billings 
'95, farm management investigations, 
U. S. Deparment of Agriculture; 
Stevenson W. Fletcher '96, director 
Virginia Experiment Station; Arthur 
C. Monahan '00. specialist in Agricul- 
tural Education, Bureau of Education, 
Washington, D. C. ; John F, Lyman 
'05, associate professor of Agricultural 
Chemistry, Ohio State University. 
Guests— Philander P. Claxton, 



UP-TO-DATE 



* COLLEGE FOOTWEAR * 



Elite Shoes, 
Swell Shod Shoes, 
Pumps the fit, - 



$3.50 to $5.00 

$5.cx) and $6.00 

$4.00 



EXPERT REPAIRING 



Pages Shoe Store, 



BETWEEN THE BANKS 



ItHE SHELDON STUDIO 

HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes. 

,0: Main St. Northampton, Mass. 

Barber j^ Shop 

RAZORS HONED 
No.2Pleaa«»t.St.. Amherst. Ma-. 

THE 



HARRISON'S NURSERlES...lHoo«er4Sini«iCo. 



Berlin, Maryland. 
Have over two thousand acres in Nursery Stock. 
They offer a book on 



616 ChMtnut St., PhiUdelphi* 



HOW TO GROW AND MARKET pROIT I J«-"«" '°'' ^"''"""*'' 

Diamond Merchants 

PhlladelpWis Official Fraternity Jeweler 



UnltJd Stater Commissioner of Edu- 
cation; Rufus W. Stlmson. special 
agent for agricultural education. Mass- 
achusetts Slate Board of Education. 

FRESHMAN SOPHOMORE FOOT. 
BALL GAME 

Last Wednesday afternoon the 
Sophomores added another victory to 
their list by defeating the Freshmen 
m the annual class football game, by 
a score of 8-0. It was generally 
expected that the game would be a 
walkover for the Sophomores on 
account of their greater weight and 
i experience of their players, but they 
had to fight every minute of the game, 
for the score they got. The Fresh- 
man team played a fast, strong game 
and came near scoring more than 

once. 

The game was marred by one acci- 
dent. Albert Tonry. one of the 
Freshman players sustained a bad 
fracture just below the knee. The 
game was fast and clean throughout. 
The scores came by a blocked punt 
recovered by Kllbourne back of the 
Freshman end for a touchdown, and a 
neat field goal from the 20-yard line 
by Smith in the third quarter. 
The line-up : 



For 50 cents. 

All prospective buyers are invited to visit the 

Nursery. 

They are the largest growers of fruit trees in 

this country. 



Kodaks, 

Eastman Films, 

Victor Talking 
Machines, 

Victor Records, 

Fountain 
Pens, 

Leather Qoods. 




MI 

PHOTOGRArHER 

The best workmanship, 

The latest styles, 

Reasonable prices 

Lincoln Building, Amherst, Mam. 



•PBOIALIBTS IN 

Fraternity B.dfe.. Fobs, Noveltlo. 

Rinj.. Ch.nn. Pri." Troph.«, 

Med.lt CoUefC Pins, Fob.. S«aU. 

Ring., Chartn..-. 



SOPHOMORES. 

Edgerton. le 
Baker. It 

Kilbourne. Anderson, if 
Edwards, c 
Griffin. Wood, rg 
Powers, rt 
Davies. re 
Smith, qb 
Brewer, Ihb 
Nlsson. rhb 
Gibson. Haicn. fb 
Score— Sophomores 



rUBSHMEM. 

re. Brooks. WliHams 
rt. Jordan 
rg. Bannister 
c. Hafer. Kelllher 
If. Tonry, Hyde 
It. Hale 
le. Sauier 
qb. Melican 
rhb. Darling 
Ihb. Houghton 
fb. Little 
Freshmen 0. 




Sanderson 

&> T hompson 

Fali 
Announcement !! 

Our Fall and Winter Outfitting for 
students is now ready. You may 
confidently look to this store for the 
very latest fashions. 

OuiPmNewPwlaSale 

We want you to feel at perfect 
liberty to look as long and as often as 
you like without buying. 

This Is the home of the Hart, 
Schafner & Marx clothes. 

Interwoven hose in all grades, 
jec, 35c and soc. 

Phoenix silk hose, soc 
The Arrow Brand and H & 1- 
collars. 
Everything you may need for your 
wardrobe at prices no one can under- 
sell. 

Sanderson 

& Thompson 

Clothiers, Hatters, Tallort 



;^— ,^^^^ma^Eo««D 



8. 



The Prospect House 



-PERRY'S- 



DEUEL'S 



DRUG STORE 



The place to eat after the game. 
Attractive tables and rooms. Excel- 
lent service. Catering a specialty. 



you WILL FIND 
A FULL LINE 
OF 



MRS. E. E. PERRY 




There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 



TOBAOOO 



AT- 



Of 



The College Drug Store 



C. R. ELDER 



i<;ore — jwK""'" -• 

Touchdown- Kilbourne. Coal from field- 
Smith. Referee-Foley of Amherst. Um- 
pire-Chapman. Field judge- Professor 
Hicks. Head linesman- Harden. T.me- 
iwo lO-minute an d two l2-minute quarters. 

SAMSOM ELECTED CAPTAIN OF 
FOOTBALL TEAM 

In a meeting of the members of the 
football team Thursday afternoon. 
Stuart D. Samson '13, of Grand Isle, 
Vt., was elected captain of next year's 
football team. Captain Samson has 
been a member of the varsity eleven 
for two years. In that time he has 
developed Into one of the strongest 
linesmen that the college has yet seen 
and during the past season has been 
the mam stay of the line, especially in 
offensive work. -Wiih his 6 fe.t. 5 
inches of height and 210 pounds of 
beef, he should make a magnificent 
leader for the Aggies." 

The athletic board has awarded let- 
ters to the following members of the 
football team: Captain, H. C. 
Walker 'l2, Curran '12. Hubert 2. 
Samson '13, Larson, '13. Gore 3 
Hayden'14. Baker'14, Brewer 4 
Smith 14. Edgerton '14. Nissen 14 
and Williams -14. WilliamD.Cov.il 
of Roxburywaselected manager of the 

'team for next season. A coach has 
not yet been chosen. 



ALBANY, 
M.Y. 



Makers 
If 



FRANK H. DANFORTH. Mg«. 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS. j 

. CAP A OOWNS 

To the American Col leges fr..m the At^ 

Amlierat Corner la RtthskelUr. specialty ^ 

STbTmAORATH &SoS I ^^^j Mientka, 

Passenger and gpo| g^d shoe Repairing, 
Baggage Transfer. I Done whue you wa.t 



Order. Wt st the Amh.r.t Ho».e w.ll reel*, 
prompt •tl«ot»on 



At-ir»l»*-'«'**i 



AlCAMM* 



MEIN 

K ,ld eive hi. head a thorough cte.ning after the tootb.ll 
Kver, man shouW g,ve ^^^^^^^^^^^ „„ ^ „^, .,,„ 

Rexall "93" Shampoo Paste 

„ «„, remove the dir, from .he «alp and leave the hair ...ky. 
Used in conneciion witn 

"93" HAIR TONIC 

.. ,„„,h of hair prevent its falling out and Veep the head 
, «i" -tore the grow.h^of ^ h._^. P^_^^^^^ ^^^ ^^ ^_,,^ ^, 

HENRY Adams & Co. 

Tt»e KBXAIvI. Store 



% 



The College Signal, Taeeday, November 28, 191 1. 



The College Signal, Tuesday. November 28, 1911. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOABD OF BDIT0B8. 

ALDEN C. BRETT. I9I2 EdHor-ln-Chlef. 

R. H. VANZWALENBURC 13. Asslsfim Editor. 
JESSE CARPENTER. JR .1912 Managing Editor. 
MARSHALL C. PRATT. I9I2. Competition Editor 
ROYAL N. HALLOWELL. 1912, Athletics. 

JOSEPH A. HARLOW. 1912. Athletics. 

OSCAR C. ANDERSON. 1913, AhimiV Notes. 
SILAS WILLIAMS, 191?. Department No»ei. 

S. MILLER JORDAN 1913. College Notes. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

ALBERT W.DODCE, 1912 Busfneit Manager. 

GEORGE ZABRISKIE 1913 Asst. Bus. Manager 
ERNEST S. CI ARK. JR., 1914. Circulatlen. 

CHESTER E. WHEELER. 1914. Circulation 

STUART B. FOSTER, 1914, C'raiUtlon. 



Subscription $1 50 per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Albert W. Dodge. 

Entervd M aeeond-cUM matter at the Amherst 
PM* OlftM. 



Vol. XXII. TUESDAY. NOV. 28. No. 11 



COLLEGE NOTES 

Coming! coming! coming! 

Phi Sigma Kapoa will hold its initia- 
tion banquet Dec. 9th and Kappa 
Sigma on Jan. 3th. 

The Dramatic Society barn-stormed 
Montague Friday night giving a very 
succestful initial permormance. 

As matters now stand the double- 
cut rule is temporarily suspended and 
will not wr<'ck many a cherished 
scheme to leave ahe.-.d of time. 

A series of flashlights were taken 
last week of various scenes In the 
Dramatics play, "What Happened to 
Jones" and will soon be on exhibition 
at college. 

The freshmen came up to expecta- 
tions with a game and fought hard, if 
unsuccessful, attempt to win their first 
athletic victory. On their one yard 
line, they held the varsity backfield for 
downs and punted out from the goal. 

Professor Sprague was the Y, M. 
C. A. speaker Thursday evening and 
his talk was heard by a large number 
of students. These meetings are 
drawing more men every week as a 
result of the strong speakers scheduled. 

Overheard on the campus — 
"What's the use of keeping quiet 
now; no matter how fresh we are the 
sophs, can't throw us in the pond. 
It's too cold. Where there is ignor- 
ance like this, 'twould be a joy to "put 
them wise." 



SUNDAY CHAPEL 

The speaker at Sunday chapel was 
Mr. Frank P. Speare of Boston. Mr. 
Speare Is at the head of the Associa- 
tion Institute in Boston. He spoke 
about vocational schools In general, 
the Association Institute in particular, 
and incidentally discussed the reasons 
for the present high cost of living. 

He said : Fourteen years ago the As- 
sociation Institute was started in con- 
nection with the Y.M. C. A. Its pur- 
pose was to give the fellow who cannot 



go to college, further education along 
the linos of his life work. The institu- 
tion has grown amazingly until now It 
has an enrollment of over 3000 with 
schools In commerce and finance, 
engineering, electricity, business and 
other vocational lines. Men taking 
vocational courses apply themselves to 
their work with much greater serious- 
ness than those taking general educa- 
tion courses. 

In his talk, Mr. Spear brought out 
what he considered to be the chief 
reason for higher cost of living. The 
present high cost of living is due to 
many sources, some of them are: The 
greater abundance of gold; govern- 
ment interference with trade, through 
the tariff; the unsettled condition of 
business, due to the uncertainty of the 
trust laws ; the agitations of the labor 
unions ; the congestion of population In 
the cities ; the habits of extravagance 
of the American people, and war and 
great fire losses. 

In closing he said: When you men 
go back to your country towns, get into 
the life there, be the leading spirit. 
In building up a career, seek to build 
up a good character, putting into per- 
manent form, the virtues which make 
for the best In life. 



FACULTY LADIES' ENTERTAIN 

The ladies of the faculty held a 
most successful reception to the stu- 
dent body Friday evening In the Drill 
Hall. The program, opened with 
music from the college orchestra, fol- 
lowed by selections given by the 
quartet. Mrs. McLean then gave two 
readings which were well received, 
and she was followed by Professor 
Lewis, who also gave readings. The 
program was closed by the singing of 
the college song. Refreshments and 
dancing closed the evening. The 
Drill Hall was prettily decorated for 
the occasion with maroon streamers, 
the stage being set off with potted 
plants. 



STOCKBRIDGE CLUB 

A debate was held at the regular 
meeting of the Stockbridge Club, on 
Tuesday evening, on the question: 
Resolved that the barrel package is 
preferable to the box package for 
apples. Headle '13 and Gibbs '12 
upheld the affirmative, their opponents 
being Gaskill '13 and Wilbur '12. 
The decision of the judges was in 
favor of the negative. After the 
debate, Professor Sears talked briefly 
on the subject, explaining points not 
brought out by the debaters. 



Y • JaL« v> Aa 

The speaker at the weekly Y. M. 
C. A. meeting Thursday evening 
was Professor Sprague. He took for 
his subject "The Pioneers of 
Christianity." 

He said In part : The Anglo-Saxons 
are intense individualists. As such 
they have missed one of the most 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



EWELL'5 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 




It's a good thing not to worry about 
your pedal apparel, its correct, style I 
comfort or durability. 

Buy your shoes from ' 

The Shop ThaUlas The Slyli 

" Walk Over, " Haywood Shoes, 

faso, I4.00, I5.00 



Holies " Special, " Stetson Shoes, 
$5.00 to $8.00 

KK.PAIkIN(; DEPARTMENT 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Next to Corner Drug Store. 



Angier, '13. 



Clark, 'ij. 



AND 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



We have a full line of Hannere, Fott 
Cards, College Songs. Seal Papers, Foun 
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Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

BASEMENT OP NO. COLLEGE 



Eldridge, 'u- 



Tarbell, '14. 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Block 
Amherst, Mass. 



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H. E. KINSMAN, 

Colkge PDotograpber 

NASH BLOCK, MAIN ST., 
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High-grade artistic work. Perfect satisfaction guaranteed. 

Studio newly equipped with large sky light 

and special lense for large 

groups. 

All styles the latest. Fine picture framing. 



important parts In the development of 
the kingdom of God. They have 
made the mistake of believing that 
the world can be converted through 
the Individual. A moralized world 
through moralized individuals is Im- 




Capt. H. C. Walker 



possible. True development along 
this line can come only through 
organization. 

The kingdom of God should be 
organized and enforced with power. 
This should be arrived at through good 
government. Today w« are too par- 



tlcular as to the character of the 
preacher who tells us what ought to be 
and not particular enough as to the 
character of the legislator who says 
! what Is to be. Injustice in political 
and social life must necessarily tend 
to break down our religious principles 
We must moralize the government 
then, as well as the individual. Then, 
when they are properly balanced, they 
will work together to produce a civil- 
ization far better than any which has 
gone before. 

IS THE RAH RAH BOY 
AESTHETIC? 

Is Mr. Taft catering to the silent 
vote? When he calls the college yell ' 
barbaric' he strikes a blow at a cher 
Ished product of higher education. 
No more forceful means of collegiate 
expression has yet been discovered. 
In its development, poetry and music 
have gone hand in hand. The college 
yell Is the almost perfect adaptation 
of sound to lack of sense. 

Authorities bold that the perfect 
yell is based on the bray of the Mis- 
souri mule, alternating with the notes 
of the game rooster, modified by the 
trumpet motive of the automobile 
horn. War whoops and the sound of 
a keg of nails falling down the cellar 
stairs, furnish an impresslvt cres- 
cendo, while the most effective fare- 
well is a cross between the song of a 
dying calf and the wall of a lost soul. 
These finer shadings are lost on the 
fat man who has no ear for music. 
But they do express the deeper emo- 
tions of a freshman turned loose on a 
civilized community. 

" -The college yell is the sweetest 
music in the world to me !' exclaimed 
a New England college president in 
his inaugural address a few weeks ago. 
Thus spoke a soul attuned to the 




Is puuing the money into a good old New Kngland faru.. He is 
making an additional payment on his Collinsville place, where h.s 
great crop of corn was grown. 

THE FIRST ElfiHT PFIZE CROPS OF mt ON STOCKBRIOBF: 

.,«.,bu.t,els harvested; „..6S hush.U crib dry. ^''''";;-;{;;;,-- 



ni.8 
110. 
101. t 
gR7 

Vi'} 

110 4 
89.7 



IO.V77 
Ssa 

849 

8j.»S 

8o.i<» 

77<»5 

76.42 



Monmoutli. Me. 
liraiil'v, Mass. 
M.idl>i>iy, N II 
S. l)eertielil. M^sh 
S. I>eeitield. M.iss 
N I'aston. Mass. 
ItKiikton, Mil!.*. 



» nis shows that the ^0,1 s of Masuuhusftts ore not yet rea.fy to he 
abandoned:-- DK. //• /»' /«//.£ J'- 

Full particulars will be sent to any address 

DAU/VDD Fertilizer Company 

DU 11 IV Li It 43 Chatham St. Boston 



F. A. 




MEN'S 



Kuppcnheimcr's 
Fine Clothes 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the French Shoe 




> * 



CUSTOM THIORING V SPECIUTt 

Thomas Hkmenwav, '.2, M. A. C. Reprcsenl.U.ve 



FOOTBALL STATISTICS 



I 



I 



X 






§ 

% 



i 

i 



I 

>- 



6, 

I 

c 

i 

>> 
S 
a 

«• 

I 

>- 



Herman C. Walker '12, 23 
Theodore J. Moreau 12. 21 
Benjamin F. Hubert 12, 25 



23 
22 
20 
21 
20 
20 



FredS. Merrill '12, 

Daniel J Curran '12, 

Albert W.Dodge •12. 

Nils P. Larsen 13. 

Stuart D. Samson '13 

Harold M.Gore '13. 

Samuel P.Huntington' 13,20 

Harold W. Brewer '14. 21 

Wmiam V. Hayden '14, 

George E. Williams '14. 
Leon E. Smith '14, 
Harry Nissen '14, 
Almon M. Edgerton '14. 22 
Warren S. Baker '14, 20 
William G. Griffin '14. 19 
Bernhardt P. Johnson '15, 23 
George D. Melican '15, 22 
Homer C. Darling '15. 
Ralph E. Phillips '15, 



21 
23 
19 
21 



Averages, 



18 

22 

Age 

21 



6ft. 180 

5ft llin. 175 
5ft. Bin. 165 
6ft. lln. 170 
5ft. 9ln. 152 
5ft. 8ln. 165 
5ft. 8ln. 165 
6ft. Sin. 210 
5ft 7ln. 140 
5ft. 8ln. 154 
5ft lOin. 168 
6ft, 202 

5ft. lOin. 165 
5ft. Sin. 147 
5ft. 7in. 155 
5ft. lOln. 158 
5ft. llin 170 
5ft. 7in. 160 
5ft 9ln. 160 
5ft. 8ln. 143 
5ft. 7in. 152 
6ft. lln. 175 
Helgtit. 
5ft. I0.2ln. 



guard, 9 

half. 8 

center. fuUback.B 



fullback. 

end, 

guard. 

end, 

tackle. 

quarter, 

end, 

half. 

tackle. 

fullback. 

quarter. 

half, 

end. 

guard, 

guard, 

center. 

quarter, 

half. 

guard. 
Weight. 
170 



Marlboro H. S. 
Turners Falls H.S. 
Atlanta Baptist Col. 

3 Dan vers H. S 

4 Marlboro H. S. 

1 Beverly H. S. 

8 Bridgeport. Conn.H.S. 

9 Burlington. Vt. H. S. 
7 Quincy, H. S. 

2 Lynn Eng. H. S. 
9 Mt.Vernon,N.Y.H. S. 
9 Beverly H. S. 

5 Willlston Academy, 

9 Mechanic Arts H. S. 

7 Mechanic Arts H. S. 

9 W.Springfield H.S. 

9 Quincy H. S. 

2 So. Hadley H. S. 
7 Mechanic Arts H. S. 
1 Worcester Academy 

3 Mendon H. S. 
I Mechanic Arts H. S. 



4 
4 

2 

1 

1 

I 
.3 

3 

3 

2 

2 

3 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

1 

1 

1 



4 
2 
7 

2 

2 



2 



2 



4 

4 

3 

2 

31 

3 
2 
2 
4 
2 
4 
2 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, ind PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for rooin 
decorations. 



HMHERST BOOR STORE 



DUDLEY 



OUTrilTEK IN 



Fine Athletic Goods 

FOR EVERY SPORT 



PARKS, 

FLORIST, 

Mowers for all occcasions. 

Mail or telephone orders given 

prompt attention. 

239 Mim St., Northampton 



lu'i s. :' « '5 



'riL Wor,»n" 
Write for cataloge. 



mt H. Dudley 

HANOVER, - - N. H. 

Agent, IIAZEN '14 



ii' 



The Collefc fttyn.l. Tuesday. November 28. 191 »■ 




The College Signal, Tuesday, November 28, 1911. 



GOODS FOR MEN. 



C. & K. Derbys, 
Keiser Cravats, 







English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 



Highest Grade Roses 

We are offering to our local patrons, selection from our large 
stock of finest Roses, especially grown for the Nkw York and Boston 
Flower Markets. 

THE MONTGOMERY CO., Inc., 



HADLEY, MASS. 



TELEPHONES. 

Amher»t. i96-R. 
hlorthampton. 660. 



WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 

In so far as our benefits are nuituai. 

THE AMHERST CAS COMPANY 

Elvorything Electrical 



Softool and College pbotograpbers . . . 




i riCAIt-Y- 52 Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

*-^ and South Hadley. Mass. 



Main Office: 

1546-1548 Broadway. 

New York City 



These .Studios offer the best skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment ol>tainahle 



Aa I am directly connerte<l with • Wholesale 
House, I can 

SAVE YOU MONEY ON CLOTHES 

will be plenneil to show namples ainl Htylc« of 
Winter Suit.-* nod Overcoats. 

II. B. WHITB, liH.-i. lliintB Block 
(T|> r>ii(> Kltnlit 

STEAM FITTING, Telephone $9-4 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PL UMBER S. 

Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial VVinoows, 
Lead Lkshts, &c. 
t Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MASS 



If you want to We 

HOMO WITH THK OIKI.M 

you mu«t have yoiirrlothpn iirt'ff.l ami i-Uaned 

AT BP STIIZM'S 

II Apilty !»t. Mnroiin .store 

PreMlOK «nd Clennlng a •pt- cialty 

Moet liberal ticket •yxtrm In town 



M. D. GILM AM. C A. MOFrST. 

TELEPHONE 1079-3. 



GILMAN and M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 

CONFECTIONERY. 

M7 to an MaIW 8TRKKT. 

Worcester, Mass. 



higher melody, one who can enjoy and 
understand the music of the mega- 
phone. " - BaUimore Sun. 

ALUMNI NOTES 

NOTICE ALUMNI ! 

The Western Alumni of the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College will hold 
their annual reunion and informal ban- 
quet at the Union League Club, 69 
West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, 
Friday evening, Dec. 8ih, 1911, at 
seven o'clock. 

President Kenyon L. Butterfleid, 
of the college will deliver the address 
of the evening. There will be infor- 
mal talks, college songs and general 
good cheer. Get on the "side lines" 
and review the spirit cf MA. C. 

Any Alumnus attending the Interna- 
tional Live Stock Show during the 
week of Dej. 2d to 9th, is cordially 
Invited and is requested to notify the 
secretary that It is his intention to at- 
tend the reunion. 

Chas. a. Farrell. S c'y. 
185 Steinway Hall. 

Chicago, 
Illinois. 

The Alumni column is intended to be 
of service to the alumni in every possi- 
ble way. We wish to call your atten- 
tion to the coming issue of the Irdex, 
due the first week in December, and 
published by the class of Nineteen 
Thirteen. Alumni can best appre- 
cisite fh<* time, work and expense con- 
nected with such an issue, and may 
wish to have a permanent record of 
the growth of the college in all Us 
branches. The Alumni Editor has 
reliable information that the Nine- 
teen Thirteen volume of the annual 
is an exceptionally g-od, wi*Il-balanced 
book. Any alumnus wishing to se- 
cure a co(.y may address O. G. An- 
derson, Box 46, Amherst, Mass. 

Another way in which this column 
may be of service is as a complete 
class record submitted by the various 
class secretaries. Such records would 
be more complete If obtained by each 
secretary, than would be possible for 
the Alumni Editor to secure. 

Such records were submitted last 
year by P. F. Wiilianis and L. S. 
Walker of 1905, and this year C, S. 
Putnam has already published a class 
address Ust for 1909. In the next Is- 
sue a recoid of 1907 will t)e published, 
submitted by Ralph J. Watts. 

If this plan is in general a possible 
one, we urge all readers of. The Signal 
to co-operate with the secretaries who 
will secure such records. Secretaries 
may correspond with the Alumni Ed- 
itor, Signal, Box 46 Amherst, Mass, 
'87. _F. H. Fowler was recently 
elected president of the Congregational 
Church Brotherhood. Shirley, Mass. 
Mr: Fowler is clerk at the state in- 
dustrial school for boys in that town. 
'97. — Dr. C. A. Peters, Assistant 
Professor of Inorganic and Scl Chem- 
istry at the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, published an article in the 



MRS. LINCOLN M/ELLS 

WILL HOLD A 

CHRISTMAS SALE 



-at- 



YeSiockamiSiiopaiiiiTBaRooDi 

OLD DEERFIEI-D 

KKOM — 

DECEMBER A TO 9.1911 



FOR FARMS ! 

Big. Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Hoiites or Building Lots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W. R BROWN 

Savings Bank Bl'k, 

Amherst, Mas*. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

OrricB llouaa: 

AMHERST 

Chp LaundiY 

Ifij^h-Gradc College Work 



LAUNDRY 

Shirts. 
Collars, 
Cuffs. - 
Plain wash, 
-Same, rough dry. 



lo-isc 

»c 

40c per doz. 

- 25c per doz. 



Ralph R TArktr. aKtnl. C. S. C. House, 

.S5 iMeasant St. 
Francis S. Madison, afj^nt for 1915 and 

short course, Vet. I. ah. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 
Fred S. Merrill, agent, C. S. C. House, 

85 Pleasant St. 
Put full fianie ami address on laundry 



Wright &Ditson 



Heidqiartirt 
for 



Athletic Supplies 



?.!l^n\'iLiJoll«gi Stitfmti 
ItLx B,ii Mil Athletes who 



Foot Ball 
Hockey 
Track and 
Field hport5 




H. a. »«t orr 



want the real, so- 
portor irticlos for 
the various sports 
should Insist upon 
those bearing thi 
Wright & Dltsoi 
Trade Mark 



Catalogue Free 

Wright & Ditson 

334 Washington St. 
Boston 

New York Chicago 

San Franclseo 
Provldenci Caibrtdge 




November Issue of the American 
Jow-nal of Science entitled "Elec- 
trolysis of Sodium Chloride with the 
Use of a Mercury Cathode." This 
Is the most complete study of sodium 
chloride known. 

'08. W. S. Regan, assistant dep- 
uty Inspector of State nurseries Is 
making a short visit at the college. 
Later, he plans to resume post gradu- 
ate work here. 

Corrections for Issue of Nov. 14th. 
The Item concerning Carleton C. 
Gowdey, Entomologist for the British 
government at Glendor. St. Michael, 
Barbadoes, should not have been In- 
cluded m the 1909 news. Mr. Gowdey 
Is a 1908 man. 

In the '09 news the name William 
Wilson is corrected to Frank H. Wil- 
son. 

ex-'il.— Marriage John Edward 
Dudley, Jr.. to Miss Frances Sherman 
Ellis on Saturday, Oct. 28th. at Ded- 
ham. 

'10.— L. S. McLaine has recently 
been elected a member of the Ameri- 
can Association for the Advancement 
of Science. 




OVER the hilU witn dog and Velvet is 
•:ompanion:ihip indeed 1 
VdveU famous a3 the finest leaf from old Ken- 
tucky—aged by lime- ihe only make-sure pro- 
cess. The leaf hangs in the old warehouse for 
over 2 years gradually chanfring from green 
to mellow -then yoti pet iSo smooth, full 
flavor-d, good tasting smoke that the southern 
planters themselvco llhe. Mcvcr a bite m 
such tobacco. 
Velvet 1 Don't forget! 

SPAU-CNG & MERRICK 



^ 



Cfliin. Vallej jLMiies 

FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new greci»- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations,violets and chy sanihemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

S7 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE NOTES 

The following are last week's fool- 
ball scores: 

Harvard 0, YaleO. 
Navy 3, Army 0. 
Holy Cross 35. Worcester TechO. 
Trinity 6, Brown 6. 
Carlisle 29, John Hopkins 6. 
Lafayette 1 1 , Lehigh 0. 
Nebraska 6, Michigan 6. 
Syracuse 6, Ohio State 0. 
Chicago 5. Wisconsin 0. 
Minnesota II, Illinois 0. 
Rutgers 3, Stevens 0. 
An interesting feature of the fourth 
national apple show, now In progress 
at Spokane, Is an exhibit, said to be 
of fine quality, contributed by Indians 
of the Kootenai valley In northeastern 
Idaho. These Indians are all on allot- 
ment lands, and are mainly engaged 
m raising hay or stock on the bottom 
lands, but of late they have turned 
successfully to fruit-growing. Chief 
Isadore, head of the Kootenai tribe, 
has an orchard of several hundred 
acres, on the rich alluvial bank of the 
Kootenai river, and grows apples, 
pears, plums and cherries. Chief 
Isaac, across the river, has developed 
a beautiful type of the Spltzenburg 
apple, entirely different from the 
Esopus type common In the West. 
A fine commentary, this, on the bar- 
barous frontier maxim that -the only 
good Indian is a dead Indian." 





i ' 



Full 2 ounce tin« 



Orch..Jirii7Bett.r Than Gold Mine. When Fertilised With 

GENUINE THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER! 

PRIZR IS WON BY THE DREW-MUNSON FRUIT CO . «>l Lltyton. Kl-S. 

Their Hrite Winning Acre of Baldwin Apple* 

OA»E THB.. A TOTAL RETURN OF .7...7.-THB NBT PROf.T WA .« 



y.le.»uie, ^^^^^ ^^^^ .^ ^^^ p^^^ ^, ^ irofit.ble Crop : 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



THE Cob Mortimer Comfahv, 



ly when We h.d over i W cars to harv*tt tn about 

/M'fl «w«itl as we had thi< year. j^aImb 

tv7n"rr ,aw b.tUr chrtd Baldjv.n AJPh, 

bMtolR at rttatlfor Sq.oo/*r barrtl. 

Vour* truly, ^ 

Barnks Brothr«». 



ICE CRE&NI, 



THE 



Oostd only pfm t A. M. to 4 A. M. 



If you are getting the 
MOST FOB YOUR MONEY 

then you are eating at the 

O. K., NFXT TO POST OFFICE 

J. W. BOUHK. Prop. 

Have you tried our 25-cent Dinners? 
If not, why not ? 



THERE IS A TRUTH IN ALL THIS FOR YOU I 

TK whole ,tory is lold in the New Edition o( our Booklet, 'Up-To-Date 
Fruit Orowlai;- Which is sent free if you mention .H. Couusn. S.a. At.. 

The Coe-Mortimer Co.,M^p-o\TE'Rs5t Chamber St., N.Y. City 

i a»..POM Mass- Brlfast. MaiHB; Bautimorb, 






11 



3 



"the College Signal, Tuesday, I«>ovember 26, 191 1. 



PI. J. Leporle, Idg. 



Proprietors of 



HOrO-mY-HOBSE 

;,Rear Draper Hotel 

Northampton. 
Tel. 183. 



ASK YOUR 

STATIONER 




FOR 



Ward's Kuuntain I'cns, ' int* I'apers 
and Knvelopes, Sludtiits' Supplies. 
Send for samples of Kni;ta\ril Invita 
tionst, Class and Fraternity Paper, 
Banquet Menus, Visitiny L"ar(b, etc. 



SAMUEL WARD CO. 



WflBO'S 



5763 Franklin Street 
BOSTON 



A// S/y/t's 0/ 

SWEATERS 
AND JERSEYS 

TRADE m ^B^ MARK 

°«ToN.MA^ 
CotnpUti Line of 

Athletic Goods 
and BANNERS 



ukaih.'wva'S', Mai 

17 South College 



It is hut a short time before Christ- 
mas. What could be letter than a 
gift of a pair of Moccasins, Moc- 
casin Cruisers or Indoor .Moccasins? 



WOOLLEY '14 

Winter Boots and Moccasins 
Indoor Moccasins 

COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 

Custom Work 

Holland's Block. Phoenix Row 



H 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 



Trains men for attractive positions in vocations 
that are not overcrowded. 

Tuition i.s free to residents of Massachusetts. 

Necessary expenses are moderate. 

A CATALOG WILL BE SENT ON REQUEST 



KENYON L. BUTTERriELD. President 

AMHERST. MASS. 
SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Footoall Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association. 

N neteen Hundred Twelve Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Thirteen Inaex, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club. 

Dramatic Society. 

Debating Society. 

Public Speaking Council, 



H. C. Walker, President 

Geo. H, Chap.Tian, Secretary 

C. C. Pearson, Manager 

R. J. Borden. Manager 

R. r. Beers, Manager 

H H. Wooa, Manager 

S. M. Jordan, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

O. G. Anderson, Manager 

F. S. Madison, Presluent 

L. S. Caldwell, President 

J D. French, Manager 

W. J. Weaver. President 

A. F. McDougall, President 

W. J. Birdsall. President 

J. M. Heald, President 

T. J. Moreau, President 



When Fitting: Out Your Room 



Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



J A CKSON &• CUTLER 



I. M[. i:,A.:BRoviTac 

telephone Connection 

TAILOR AND PRESSER 

Fall and Winter Suits 

Chevrons and Stripes 

Put on Military Suits 

Full Dress Suits to Rent 

Gents' F'urnishings 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 



Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. 



1424-1426 Chestnut St., 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

LKN.H ttKINUINO 

/"«// /ine of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled 



PROMINENCE 

Is givtii here to the fact that we lake 

special care in the posinjj of 

subjects in order 10 bring 

out all the go<id 

features. 

Light and shade is skilfully dili'used. 

This and the excellent finish makes 

our I'HOTOCJRAPHS masterpieces 

of reproductive art. 

SHILLARE'S STUDIO. 

142 Main St., Northampton 

F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 



THE TEKPSY PARLOR 

CLEANSING. 

PRESSING. 

REPAIRING. 

Uuickcal !M<r«lro, Best Work, L.ow«»t Price 

All wuik carefully done. Work called for and 
delivered, (ientt' overcoats, suits, pants and 
coats. L.adies' hne linen suits a specialty. 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 

Rear Nash Bi'k. Amherst. Tel. Nu. 34a-4 



CARS 

Leave AQQie COLLEQE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AOtilE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mlm. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Cars at ReaaonaMa Rates 



AIHERST k SUNDERLAND ST. Kt. CO 



THE NEW ENGLAND NEWSPAPER 

All the news and the Truth 
about it, in the :: :: 

Springfield Republican 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 
News fully reported. 

BEST SPORTING PAGES 

The Weekly Republican will be sent 
free for one month to anyone 

wishing to tiy it. . , . ->. 

Dai/y, $8. Sunday, $2. Weekly, $/. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNU 



Vol. XXII. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAi. COLLEGE: 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, December 12, 1911. 



oc 



No. 12 



THETA PHI GOES NATIONAL 



SOCIAL UNION CONCERT NEW YORK CLUB BANQUET HOCKEY SE -^^ I OPENS 



Being Oranted Charter by Theu Chi. 
Third National Fraternity Hare. 

Theta Phi Fraternity has been 
granted a charter by the national fra- 
ternity Theta Chi. It becomes the 
Theta chapter of that fraternity. 

The Theta Chi Society war founded 
April 10, i856 at Norwich University 
then located at Norwich, Vt. Its 
founders were Arthur Chase of the 
class of '56 and Frederick Norton 
Freeman '57. It was their desire to 
provide for the benefit of their Alma 
Mater, a society In which fellow stu- 
dents might receive that training in 
the study of literature and In debate 
which was so Important a part of the 
education of the young man of the 
period. It took the form of a secret 
society. 

The constitution of the society pro- 
vided for making It a national organiza- 
tion, but It remained a local for forty- 
six years, following the fortunes of 
Norwich University through the Civil 
War and upon the burning of the col- 
lege buildings at Norwich, went with It 
to Norihfleld Vt. 

The chapter roll is as follows : 
1856— Alpha, Norwich University. 
1901— Beta, Massachusetts institute 

of Technology. 
1907 — Gamma, University of Maine. 
1808— Delta, Rensselaer Polytechnic 

Institute. 
1909— Epsllon, Worcester Polytechnic 

Institute. 
1910— Zeta, New Hampshire College. 
1911- Eta, Rhode Island State Col- 
lege. 
Among the prominent alumni are: 
Charles Forster Sayles. engineer on 
construction of Hoosac Tunnel ; 
Edward Bancroft Williston, Brigadier 
Gen. U. S. A., Governor Soldleri' 
Home, Washington, D. C. ; George 
Albert Converse, Rear Admiral U. S. 
N. ; Joseph Stedman, M. D., Boston; 
Henry Elilah Alvord, college president 
and prominent agriculturalist; Julius 
Jacob Estey, Capt. W. S. A. and 
bank president; William Rutherford 
Mead, distinguished architect ; Henry 
Moses Phillips, Capt. U. S. A., 
Vayor, State Senator, State Treas- 
urer of Massachusetts and director in 
many corporations; Joseph Hiram 
Goulding, Lieut. U. S. A., Military 
Secretary of Vermont and bank treas- 
urer ; Benj. Kearny Roberts, Brig. 
Gen. U. S. A. retired ; Holland New- 
ton Stevenson, Chief Eng. W. S. N.; 
George Bralnard Blodgett,geneologlst, 
historian and lawyer; Samuel W. 
Shattuck. Comptroller University of 
Illinois; William Richard Cutter, 



Gamble Concert Party Bntertaina. 
Oood Program Rendered. 

Under the auspices of the Social 
Union a musical recital of unusual 
merit was presented Saturday evening 
in the chapel by the Ernest Gamble 
Concert Party of Pittsburgh. The 
program was admirably balanced to 
afford a pleasing diversity of style and 
theme, its numbers ranging in type 
from folk songs to grand opera. 
Mr. Gamble gave the vocal numbers 
in a rich, highly-pleasing baritone and 
his personal style added much to the 
selections. Miss Page, violinist, In- 
terpreted her numerous works with a 
remarkable exhibition of technique 
which was, however, at times too 
showy for the occasion. Her stage 
appearance was also all that could be 
desired. Mr. Shonert at the piano 
furnished the remainder of the pro- 
gram with well-played selections which 
were especially aided by brilliant 
encores. As a whole, the program 
was artistic and entertaining although 
showing a slight attempt toward display 
at the sacrifice of simpler melody. 



COMMENCEMENT SPEAKER 



•81. 
'82. 



[Coattauadea paca 2] 



The commencement speaker at the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College 
next June will be Hon. Charles W. 
Garfield of Grand Rapids, Mich. Mr. 
Garfield Is an alumnus of the Michigan 
Agricultural college and is a prominent 
fruit grower and business man of Grand 
Rapids. He has served In many pub- 
lic capacities, Including the legislature 
and as a trustee of the Michigan Agri- 
cultural college. For many years he 
was chairman of the Michigan forestry 
commission and did more than any 
other man in that state to forward 
scientific forestry interests. He Is a 
man of high public spirit, and hasl^eo '^^ 
called "the most useful citizen of 
Grand Rapids." He is a pleasing and 
vigorous speaker, and is in close touch 
with the educational as well as the 
business world. His name has been 
mentioned as that of a man who would 



'78. 



make an 
Agriculture. 



efficient secretary of 



ASSEMBLY 

The Wednesday Assembly was 
addressed by Industrial Secretary F. E, 
Rindge of the International committee 
of the Y. M. C. A. He outlined the 
student work that Is being done through- 
out the colleges of the country. 

This college has been doing a great 
deal of this work In that direction and 
Mr. Rindge gave some valuable point- 
ers to those engeged in teaching work. 



Held Friday at Hotel St. Denis. Many 
Alumni Present. 

The 26th annual reunion of the Mass- 
achusetts Agricultural College Club 
of New York, was held Friday evening 
In the St. Denis Hotel, Prof. Henry 
E. Chapin, Sc. D. , '81 presiding. 
Speakers for the evening were, former 
State Senator Charles A. Gleason, 
Springfield ; Frank A. Hosmer. trustee 
M. A. C. ; Atherton Clark of Boston, 
son of the late Col. Wm. S. Clark for 
many years president of M. A. C. ; 
Charles S. Howe, Ph. D., Sc. D., 
LL. D.. '78, President Case School 
of Applied Science ; Dr. John A. 
Cutter of New York; H. C. Walker 
'12, captain of the football team and 
A. C. Brett '12, editor-ln-chlef of The 
College Signal. A. list of those 
present f'lllows : — 

•72. Daniel P. Cole, Sprlngfled. 
•73. John B. Minor, New Britain. 

Conn. 
•75. |os. M. Barrett, New York 
City. 
John A. Barri, Bridgeport, Ct. 
•77. — Artherton Clark. Boston. 

Frank G. Urnor. N'*w Y re 

City. 
Sanaford D. Foot, P^ttersun, 

N. J. 
Charles S. Howe, president 
Case School of Applied 
Science. 
Charles E. Lyman. Mlddlefield, 

Conn. 
J. H. Washburn. 
Henry E. Chapin, So, D. 
Charles E. Beach, Hartford, 

Conn. 
John A. Cutter. M. D.. New 

York city. 
James S. Williams, Glaston- 
bury, Conn. 
Alfred W. Lublin, New York 

city. 
B. Tekirian, New York city. 
Dr. Winfield Ayres. New York 

city. 
William A. Eaton, New York 
city. 

'92. A. C. Beals. New York city. 
'94. L. E. Goessmann, New York 

city. 
'95. Walter L. Morse, New York 

city. 
'97. George D. Leavens, New York 
city. 
George A. Drew, Greenwich, 
Conn. 
•98. Julian S. Eaton, New York city. 
'03. Stephen C. Bacon. Jersey City. 
Clifford A. Tinker. Westfleld. 
E. B. Sneli. 



With Defeat at Hands of B. A. A. 

Seven. Four Regulars 

Ineligible. 

Weakened by the ineligibility of four 
of Its regulars, the hockey team put up 
a game though losing fight against the 
fast B. A. A. seven at the Boston 
Arena Wednesday night, losing lO-l. 
The team showed plainly Its lack of 
practice having had only one day's 
practice on the Ice previous to the 
game. 

Our only score, made by Captain 
Peckham came on the first half. 
Hutchinson, Jones, Woolley and Mac- 
donald were out of the game on ac- 
count of trouble with their studies but 
hope to get into the action against 
Springfield tomorrow. The line-up 
follows: 



M, A c, 

f. Brewer 

f, Peckham 

f, Walker 

f. Sanctuary 

p. Whitney. Ellis 

goal, Ackerman 



•85. 
'86. 



(CootlaaaA oa pace 21 



B. A. A. 

Leslie, f 

Gardiner, Wtnsor. f 
Htcks. f 

Hornblower, J. Foster, f 
WInsor, N. Foster p 
Canterbury, goal 

Score — Beaton Athletic Association 10, 
Aggie I. Coals made by Leslie 4. Hlcka, 
WInsor 2. N. Foster 2, Gardner, Peckham 
Reteffc- j. NctfolK fune - iit-mluws 
I a V- 

The game ^hedukd tor iaat Satur- 
day with Connecticut State was can- 
celled by them because their team had 
had no ice on which to practice. A 
game between the ••ellglbles" and the 
*'lneligibles" was to have been substi- 
tuted but was called off because of the 
softening of the Ice in Saturday morn 
ing's drizzle. 

OUTLOOK OF MUSICAL CLUBS 

After considerable delay, the Musi 
cal Association has finally secured a 
director. Mr. Frederick Goodwin of 
Westfleld has been engaged to coach 
the orchestra, glee and mandolin 
clubs. His work began last Tuesday 
and clearly showed that no mistake 
has been made In his selection. 
With this step in advance, the clubs 
are looking forward to a bright season, 
although a somewhat shorter one than 
Is usual, The Association is bearing 
a share of the expense of the director 
with the college and faculty and this 
added responsibility Is sure to show 
results. Candidates for the clubs are 
coming out In good numbers although 
the management wishes at this time 
to make a call for all the mandolins, 
guitars and banjos, either available or 
willing to learn, In the college. Sev- 
eral short trips are planned with the 
possibility of a long one at Easter and 
It is at least hoped that the way will 
be paved for a successful season next 
year. 



iMtES::amjj,v 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December tz, 1911. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 12, 191 1. 



\ 



THETA PHI GOES NATIONAL 

[Continued from paga I ] 



librarian, author, historian and geneo- 
logist; William Henry Wentworth, 
Civil Engineer builder of many rail- 
roads ; Walter Dole, Clergyman ; Bur- 
leigh Franklin Spaulding, lawyer, edu- 
cator, member of Congress; Charles 
Horace Spooner, educator, president 
of Norwich University; John Benj. 
Johnson, educatior and long time pro- 
fessor at Norwich ; Henry Blanchard 
Hersey. meteorologist, "Rough Rider" 
and aerial navigator: Robert Listen 
Irish, physician ; Edward Aiken Shut- 
tleworth. Civil Engineer, U. S. A. 
Capt. ; DeWitt Clinton Webb, Civil 
Engineer, Lieut. U. S. N. ; Robert 
Henry Ford, Civil Engineer, member 
A. S. C. E. ; Ernest Willard Gibson, 
educator, lawyer, and State Senator; 
Winfred Ballard Carr, Civil Engineer. 
Capt. U. S. Artillery Corps. 



NEW YORK CLUB BANQUET 

(Continued from Mg« I .] 



'04. 

•05. 
'06. 

'07. 



•08. 



'12. 



Maurice A. Blake, New Bruns- 
wick, N. J. 

Ralph P. Gay, Plainfleld, N. J. 

Lieut. A. A. Raclcot, U. S. 
Marine Corps. 

Fred A. Cutter, Orange, N. J. 

James H. Walker, Newark, 
N. J. 

J. A. Anderson, Montclair, N, 
J. 

W. J. Coleman. Newark. N. J. 

Arthur J. Farley, New Bruns- 
wick. N. J. 

K. E. Gillett. 

A, C. Brett. 

H. C. Walker. 



NEW DAIRY BUILDING 

The new dairy building now 
under construction is to be known 
as the Flint Laboratory, named In 
honor of the Honorable Charles L. 
Flint, fourth president of the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College. 

This building is the first of the pro- 
posed Agricultural group the others 
being for agriculture and farm me- 
chanics. The Agricultural building 
will be the central one of the group. 

The large number of short course 
students and the increasing number of 
four year students taking dairy work 
made it Imperative that something be 
done to Improve the present limited 
and inadequate facilities. Plans 
were made and the last legislature 
provided $75,000 for this purpose. 

The dairy building will be 1 20 feet 
long. 62 feet wide, with a basement 
and two stories. The construction Is 
fireproof being of reinforced concrete 
and brick with a slate and gravel roof. 
The partitions will be made of four- 
inch terra cotta block with a hard 
cement plaster on each side. The 
finish will be smooth and sanitary. An 
eight foot corridor will run the full 
length of the building on each floor. 
Large glass windows will be placed In 
the corridor walls so that the work 



being done in the different rooms can 
be seen to advantage from the corri- 
dor, without the visitors interfering in 
any way with the students. 

The basement will contain a laun- 
dry, a locKer room that will accommo- 
date lockers for 150 men, shower 
baths, a cheese manufacturing room 
and cheese curing room, storage 
rooms, and a dairy mechanic's room, 
as well as a room with an artificial 
refrigerating plant. The refrigerating 
plant is designed to furnish refrigera- 
tion for the cold box or refrigerator as 
well as to make artificial ice if desired. 

The first floor will have two offices 
in the front, with the milk handling 
laboratories back of them, A space 
104 feet long by 24 feet wide on the 
north side of this floor will be given 
exclusively to the separating of milk, 
ripening of cream and making of dairy 
better. On the south side of the 
building on this floor will be found a 
complete market milk equipment In- 
cluding a 16-foot by 16-foot refriger- 
ator and a 27-foot by 20-foot Ice 
cream manufacturing room. The 
refrigerator will be equipped in such a 
way that either artificial refrlgeratlcn 
or natural ice can be used to keep it 
cold. 

The second floor will have one 
office and a department reading room. 
On this floor there will also be a dairy 
bacteriological laboratory that will 
accommodate 20 men at one time ; a 
Babcock laboratory 62 feet by 24 feet 
that will accommodate 30 men ; and 
a special feature in a dairy equipment 
museum 57 feet by 24 feet for which 
it Is hoped a permanent exhibit of 
dairy apparatus may be obtained, as 
well as loans of up-to-date dairy appli- 
ances for exhibition during the time 
that the short course students and 
Farmers' Week visitors are here. If 
this can be done the four year men 
will have advantages along this line far 
above those ordinarily afforded. 

This building is designed for instruc- 
tion to meet Massachusetts dairy con- 
ditions — market milk and farm dairy 
work. The laboratories wilt accom- 
modate 100 men at one time If 
desired. This equipment along with 
our certified milk equipment, that we 
will use even more in the future, as a 
laboratory, will give M. A. C. one of 
the best, if not the best, college mar- 
ket milk equipments in the country. 



THE 1913 INDEX 

The de luxe edition of the annual 
arrived Monday afternoon, completing 
the consignments received from the 
printer. Any one who has not yet 
obtained a copy of either edition may 
secure one at the Senate room from 
1-00 to 1-20 p. M. Thursday. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Mr. Rindge, who was at the college 
for the latter part of the week, ad- 
dressed the Y. M. C. A. Thursday 
evening on social service work. 



UP-TO-DATE 



* COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 4 



Elite Shoes, 
Swell Shod Shoes, 
Pumps the fit, - 



$3.50 to $5.00 

- $5.00 and $6.00 

$4.00 



EXPERT REPAIRING 



PAGE'S Shoe Store, 



BETWEEN THK BANKS 



HARRISON'S NURSERIES... 

Berlin, Maryland. 
Have over two thousand acres in Nursery Stock. 
They offer a book on 

HOW TO GROW AND MARKET FRUIT 

For 50 cents. 

All prospective buyers are invited to visit the 

Nursery. 

They are the largest growers of fruit trees in 

this country. 



Kodaks, 

Eastman Films, 

Victor Talking 
Machines, 

Victor Hecords, 

Fountain 
Pens, 

Leather Goods. 



DEUEL'S 



DRUC STORE 




PHOTOGRAPHER 

The best workmanship, 

The latest styles, 

Reasonable prices 

Lincoln Building, Amherst, Mass. 



The Prospect House 



PERRY'8- 



The place to eat after the game. 
Attractive tables and rooms, tlxcel- 
lent service. Catering a specialty. 



MRS. EI. E. PERRY 

Ihere are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 



or 



C. R. ELDER 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes. 



■ 01 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass, 



>E. N. PARISEAU.j* 

Barber j^ Shop 

RAZORS HONED 



DRAMATICS 

The Dramatic society will stage 
•'What Happened to Jones" next 
week in three different towns. The 
first appearance will be at Richmond 
Hill. Brooiiiyn, N. Y. where a matinee 
and an evening performance will be 
given Saturday Dec. 16. Hacken- 
saclc, N. J, will be the next town 
visted, Dec. 18, and the last petform- 
ance of the trip will be at Rutherford, 
N, J. the following day. 

The cast will be identical with that 
which presented the play at Montague. 
Nov. 24, and accompanied by the 
coaches, Mr. and Mrs. James K. 
Mills, will leave on Friday next. 



No. 2 PleaMOt, St., Amherst, Mass. 



THE 



Hoover & Smith Co, 



616 Chestnut St., Philsdelphis 



Jewelers and Silversmiths, 



.Diamond Merchants. 



Ptiliadelplila's Official Fntemltr Jeweler 



8PEOIA1.IST8 IN 

Frsternity Bsdces, Fobs, Novelties, 
Rings, Chsrtns ...... Priics. Trophies. 

Medslt Collcfe Pins, Fobs, Sesls, 

Rin(s, Charms.'. 



you WILL FIND 
A FULL LINE 
OF 



iloais S Gioaniiles 



TOBAOOO 



AT- 



CHEMICAL CLUB 

At the regular meeting of the 
Chemical Club last Tuesday evening. 
Frye C. Pray '06 gave an interesting 
lecture on "The Sugar Industry In 
Cuba " Mr. Pray, who has spent 
considerable time in the sugar Indus- 
try, is at present head chemist and 
superintendent of the Trinidad Sugar 
Company. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES. 

Prof. F. A. Waugh lectured before 
the horticultural society of Baltimore, 
Md., on Wednesday, his subject being 
"Fruit Growing." 

Prof. A. Norman gave his third 
lecture on "Pruning," at the Thurs- 
day evening meeting of the Spring- 
field Y. M. C. A. This is one of a 
series of lectures which Professor 
Norman is now giving. 



The next hockey game scheduled is 
with Springfield Training School at 
Springfield tomorrow. 



The College Drug Store 



FOR FARMS ! 

Big, Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building I^ts 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W. R BROWN 

Savings Bank Bl'k, 

Amherst, • Ma«e. 



KirAchbaum Qotfiei 

ALL WpOt. HAWDIMI^W 




^ % ■«ICI**«kUM % CA 



Sanderson 

df Thompson 

Fi 
Announcement !! 

Our Fall and Winter Outfitting for 
students is now ready. You m.iy 
confidently look to this store for the 
very latest fashions. 

Oor Prices Never Prevent a Sale 

We want you to feel at perfect 
liberty to look as loiij{ and as often as 
you like without buyin;;. 

This is the home nf tlic Hart, 
Schafner & Marx clothes. 

Interwoven hose in all grades, 
a5c, 35c and <oc. 

Phoenix silk hose, 50c. 

The Arrow Itrand and H. it I. 
collars. 

Kverything you may need for your 
wardrobe at prices no one can under- 
sell. 

Sanderson 

&f Thompson 

ClotMers, Hatters, Tailors 



The Worthy 



FRANK H DANFORTH. Mr.ii. 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



AmherHt Corner In RathHkrIlar. 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makers 
If 



M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 

Ordertleft at th« Amherst HovM will r«c«i*« 
prompt attention. 



CAR & GOWNS 



To the American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. CUm ConlracU a 
Specialty. 



Toefll Mientka, 

Boot and Shoe Repairing, 



iJone while ymi svaiJ. 



A. fki lmcM*M t « 



AlfflMM* 



REIMEMBEIR ! 



R KM EMBER 
REMEMHKR 

k KM EMBER 

REMEMHKR 
REMEMBER 
REMKMBKR 
R KM EM HER 

REMEMBER 
RKMKMHKR 

R KM EMBER 
REMEMBER 
REMEMBER 
REMEMBER 
REMEMBER 
REMEMBER 



the folks at home. 

that we keep the best cigars in the best condition for the 

best trade. 

that we have boxes of 12, 35 and 50 cigars put up especially 

for holiday trade. 

that tobacco in humidor containers makes a very nice gift. 

that we carry pipes in all styles and prices. 

that you will find everything for the smoker here. 

that you cannot find a better variety of cigarettes than in our 

store. 

that Liggett's Chocolates are better than others. 

that Symphony Lawn .Stationery is the best obtainable. We 

sell it. 

that the best perfumes and toilet waters are sold here. 

that we want our store to be your store. 

that we sell stamps at cost and other prices arc- right. 

that we wish you a Merry Christmas and a Jfappy New Year. 

that we want to see you before you go home. 

that we are 



Henry Adams & Co. 



The College Signal, Toesdaj, December 13, 191 1. 



The College Signal, Tneednj, December la, 191 1. 



THE COLLE GE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening; by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Africultural College. 

BOASD OF BDIT0B8. 

ALDEN C. BRETT. 1912 EdMor-ln-ChM. 

R. H. VANZWALENBURC 13. Aialitant Editor. 
JESSE CARPENTER. JR .1912 Manarlng Editor. 
MARSHALL C. PRATT 1912. Competition Editor 
ROYAL N. HALLOWELL. 1912. Athletic*. 

JOSEPH A. HARLOW. 1912. Athletic*. 

OSCAR C. ANDERSON. 1913. AhimnI NolM. 
SILAS WILLIAMS, 1912. OvpartriMnt Note*. 

S. MILLER JOKOAN, 1913. CoUage NoUa. 



BUSINESS DEPABTMBNT. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912. Bu*in«M Matur«r. 

GEORGE ZABRtSKIE. 1913 Ami. Sua. Mana^ar 
ERNEST S. CLARK JR.. 1914. Clrculatlen. 

CHESTER E. WHEELER. 1914. Circulation. 
STUART B. FOSTER 1914. Cmitotloo. 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Albert W. Dodge. 



Entcrad as aaoond-claa* matter at th* AmlMrM 
PmI OtriM. 



Vol. XXII. TUESDAY, DEC. 12. No. 12 



The oezt issue of the Signal will 
appear Jan. 9, 1913. 



The Christmas season has coine 
again and has brought with it another 
volunne of the Index, The book for this 
year has been enlarged by the addition 
of new departments and the extension 
of the old and is in every way a repre- 
sentative college annual. The general 
plan is that of the 1912 Index with but 
few changes. More half-tones and 
line drawings are used than ever before 
and the new views of the campus taken 
especially for this book are very attrac- 
tive. The grinds are Inserted near the 
middle and are of a remarkably clean 
and lively sort. The only place in 
which it would seem that the usual 
excellent judgment of the editor-in- 
chief and his associates had been car- 
ried away by personal or class feeling 
is In tendency to "knock" particularly 
the preceding publication ; however, 
this fault Is not carried to the extreme 
and must to some extent be expected 
in a work of this kind. As a whole, 
the book is well worthy to take its place 
with those that have gone before, and 
the editors are to be commended for 
the excellent work they have done In 
bringing it to completion. 



During the past week the elegibillty 
rule has been brought to the front by 
the inability of four members of the 
hockey team to participate in the open- 
ing game. For some time past this 
rule has not been clearly defined In the 
minds of the men, this condition being 
due in part at least, to its indiscrimi- 
nate handling a year ago. The rule 
In force at present states that a man 
in order to participate in certain college 
activities, shall have a rank of at least 
60^ In all his current work. 

It can be seen at once that this rule 
Is ambiguous, unfair, and difficult of 
Interpretation. What is current work? 
Does this mean the grade of work 



that the man is doing at the time of 
the contest or does It mean his term 
average up to that time? The latter 
interpretation Is put on It by the ath- 
letic board and this is the result. A 
man whose preparation In a certain 
subject has been rather meagre, Is 
debarred from the sport because his 
early work In the subject has been 
poor enough to pull his average down 
below 60^ while at the time of the 
contest he Is steadily Improving and is 
doing work well above the passing 
grade. There is absolutely no reason 
to believe that this man will not ulti- 
mately pass his subject in a creditable 
manner and still our rule debars him 
from anticipation In all athletic con- 
tests. Should not the grade of work 
that the man is doing at the time 
of the contest be considered in decid- 
ing his elegibility? 

A second aspect of the situation 
which needs consideration Is the fact 
that because a man must be up In all 
his current work, any one member of 
the faculty who has an athlete regis- 
tered under him has the power to 
keep this man out of all athletics 
should he (or any reason desire to do 
so. While such a case would rarely 
arise, nevertheless the opportunity 
should not be allowed to exist. 

As bad as are the conditions brought 
about by the rules themselves, the 
situation Is made even worse by the 
lack of cooperation between the ath- 
letic department and the rest of the 
faculty. The system as now operated 
calls for monthly reports of the stand- 
ing of each man to the dean's office. 
Thus a man's standing in his "current 
work" is simply his average to the 
time of the last monthly report and is 
not influenced by any work done since 
that time. Wishing to keep in closer 
touch with the scholastic standing 
of the men entered in athletics the 
dean requested of the instructors that 
they give weekly reports on these men. 
The request was utterly ignored. 
Such an act needs no comment, it 
speaks for itself. 

Athletics have a place at Massachu- 
setts but to determine exactly what 
that place Is, proves to be a very dif- 
ficult proposition and leads to a con- 
sideration of a number of questions, 
among which is this one. Is the posi- 
tion which our athletic activitltles 
occupy here sufficiently Important to 
justify the request, that. In order to 
keep the men up to the standard of 
scholarship required by the rules, the 
faculty make weekly reports of the 
few directly concerned? 

The cooperation of the student 
with the Instructor as shown by per- 
sonal respect and a serlotisness of 
purpose and the cooperation of the 
instructors with the student are both 
closely related, one being directly 
dependent on the other, and it may 
be that a lack of this spirit on the part 
of one party can be explained by a 
corresponding lack on the part of the 
other. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 




E WELL'S 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



It's a good thing not to worry about 
your pedal apparel, its correct, style 
comfort or durability. 

Buy your shoes from 

The Shop ThaUias The Style 

" Walk Over, " Haywood Shoes, 

13. 50, I4.00, $5.00 



Boiles " Special, " Stetson Shoes, 
I5.00 to $8.00 



REPAIRING DEPARTMENT 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Next to Corner Drug Store. 



Angier, '13. 



Clark, '13. 



We have a full line of Banners, Pott 
Cards, College Songs, Seal Papers, Foun- 
tain Pens, Candy, Tonic and Student 
Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

BASEMENT OP NO. COLLEGE 



Eldridge, '14. 



Tarbell, '14. 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. 

Amherst, 



Phillips Block 
Mass. 



C^rptn-ler S Morehoust, 

PRIflTEnS, 



No I, Cook Place, 



Amherit, Masa. 



H. E. KINSMAN, 

College Photographer 



NASH BLOCK, MAIN ST., 
AMHERST, :: 



MASS. 



High-grade artistic work. Perfect satisfaction guaranteed. 

Studio newly equipped with large sky light 

and special lense for large 

groups. 

All styles the latest. Fine picture framing. 



COLLEGE NOTES 

The Nineteen Thirteen Index has 
recently been put on sale, and mall 
orders will be filled this week. 

The outdoor track was put up during 
the Thanksgiving recess and Capt. 
Clapp has his squad working out on It 
daily, 

It is the general opinion of the whole 



NINETEEN-FIVE. 

Adams, R. L. Sc. 331 Cayuga 
street, Salinas, Cal. Director of 
Spreckels Sugar Company, Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station, Spreckles, 
Cal. 

Allen. G. H.. 11 Williams Street, 
West Somerville, fruit grower. 

Barnes, H. L., Lakevlew Farm, 



college, Including of course the Seniors, Interlake, Siockbrldge, farmer. 



that the Ninete-in-Thirteen Index Is the 
best ever. 

The new hockey rink, now In place 
on the pond is the largest one In the 
western part of the state being 205 
feet by 96 feet. 

Freshman caps will soon be a thing 
of tne past and we may expect, after 
New Years to see the members of 
1915 looking like ordinary mortals. 

Phi Sigma Kappa held its Initiation 
banquet at the Draper, Saturday nlgh». 
Delegates from Brown, Williams, 
Yale, Dartmouth, Franklin and Mar- 
shall were present. 

Dr. Samuel Eliot of Boston was the 
speaker at Sunday morning chapel. 
His theme was "Practical religion; 
what it means, how obtained, and what 
it does for us and others." 

After the first Index rush was over 
(200 were sold In the first 35 minutes) 
to of the leading lights of our faculty 
were seen retreating with satisfied 
looks and ccples of the k>ook. 

Tne question has been more or less 
forcibly brought to the minds of vari- 
ous students as to whether the college 
store Is a "college" store or merely a 
first class example of the cbsed shop. 

Nineteen hundred and fourteen has 
made the following elections to the 
Index board ; Editor-ln-chlef. Stuart 

B. Foster of West Somerville; busi- 
ness manager. Ernest S. Clark Jr. of 
Tolland. 

"A taitor in a small western city 
has a head for advertising. In front 
(A his store stands an oil barrel with 
the head knocked in. The barrel Is 
bright green and on It In red letters Is 
painted, 'Stand In my barrel while I 
press your clothes for fifty cents.' " — 

C. E. take notice. 

Beginning with the next Issue of the 
Signal an "Unpopular Corner" of col- 
lege notes column will be opened. 
Communications setting forth the un- 
popularity of any object, custom or 
condition will be joyfully welcomed and 
will receive special attention from our 
gloom artists. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'04. — The first annual meeting of 
the State College Chapter of the 
M. A. C. Alumni association was cel- 
ebrated by a good old New Thanks- 



Bartlett, F. A., Stamford, Ct., 
president and manager of H. L. Frost 
& Bartlett Co. 

Crosby, H. D., Rutland, farmer. 

Cushman, Esther C, 683 Hope 
Street, Providence, R. L, assistant 
at Annmary Brown Memorial. 

Gardner, J. J., Durham, N. H., In- 
structor in Olericulture at New Hamp- 
shire State College. 

Gay, R. P., 316 East Front Street. 
Plainville, N. J., forester. 

Hatch. W. B., Nayatt. R. I., con- 
struction superintendent for the new 
Rhode Island Country club. 

Holcomb, C. S., 38 Westland Ave- 
nue. Boston, professor of voice and 
expression, Boston School of Ex- 
pression. 

Hunt, T, F.. Botany Building, Uni- 
versity of California, Berkeley. Cal.. 
plant pathologist. 

Ingham, N. D.. Santa Monica. 
Cat, director of California State Ex- 
periment Station for study of eucalyp- 
tus. 

Kelton. J. R., 34 Pearl Street, 
Amsterdam, N. Y., teacher. 

Ladd, E. T.. 609 Falls Road Ter- 
races, Roland Park, Md., Chemist, 
with Baugh Chemical Co. 

Lewis, C. W., Melrose Highlands. 

Lyman. J. F., Ph. D.. 1345 High- 
land Street.. Columbus, Ohio, pro- 
fessor of Chemistry, Ohio State Col- 
lege. 

Munson, W. A., manager for Drew 
Munson Company, Littleton, fruit 
grower. 

Newhall, E. W., Jr., manager for 
Newhall Land Company. 260 Cali- 
fornia Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Patch, G. W.. 260 Broadway. Arl- 
ington, assistant manager Brown- 
Durrell Company, 104 Kingston Street, 
Boston. 

Sanborn Taft, Mrs. M. L., Brooks 
Farm, Northfleld, Vt., R F. D., No. 
4. 

Sears. W. M., Franklin, farmer. 
Owner "Laymour" fruit and poultry 
farm. 

Swain, A. N.. 15 Merlin Street, 
Dorchester, Boston manager Munson- 
Whittaker Company. 

Taylor, A. D., M. Sc, 1 101 Tre- 
mont Building, Boston, personal rep- 



givlng dinner at the home of Prof 

John W. Gregg, M. A. C. '04, State i resentative and general superintend- 



'Crops With The 
Guesswork Left Out" 

TIE HUT Dtn niZE MIPS OF till II STICdIIKE : 



ite.4 butthelt hurvestcd; iu.68 bushels crib dry. 

I3I.I 

no. 

101. 3 

<>8.7 

999 
110 4 

89.7 



4 •» 


103-77 




8st 


• (* 


849 


t •• 


83. »« 


* M 


80.S9 


• t* 


77 9S 
76.5s 



Collin»»ille, Conn. 
Monmouth, Me. 
(iraiiby, M»*s 
Madbury. N II. 
S. Deer^rUI. Mass. 
S. DeertieUI. Mi»M. 
N. Kastoii. Mass. 
Krockton, Mass. 



•' This shows that the soils of Stassachusetts are not yet ready to be 
abandontdr-DR. H. W. WILEY. 

A 13-page illustrated pamphlet giving full 
particulars will be sent to any address 



BOWKER 



Fertilizer Company 

43 Chatham St. Boston 



F. A. SHEPARD 

MEN'S STORE 



Kuppenheimer's 
Fine Clothes 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the FreDcb Shoe 

CUSTOM THIIORING A SPECIUTT 

Thomas Hemenway, 'la, M. A. C. Representative 




We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, IH PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Poitert and pennants for room 
decorations. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



College, Pa. Among those present 
were Luther G. Willis '09. Ralph A. 
Waldron '10, James F. Adams '11 
andC. A. Smith '11. 



ent tor Warren H. Manning, land- 
scape designer. 

Tompson, H. F.. fruit and vegeta- 
ble grower, Attleboro, R. F. D. No. 4. 



PARKS, 

FLORIST, 

Flowers for all occcasions. 

Mail or telephone orders given 
prompt attention. 

239 Mill St., Nirtfciiptw 



DUDLEY 

OUTflTTER IN 

Fine Athletic Goods 

FOR EVERY SPORT 




'T^t 5cST In Tne WoftLo" 
Write for cataloge. 



Gliarliis H. Dudley 

HANOVER, - . N. H. 

Agent, HAZEN M4 



The Collcfe Signal, Tuesday, December 12, 191 1. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 12, 1911. 



"\ 




GOODS FOR MEN. 

C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 

English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 



AMHERST. 



DARTMOUTH. 



«ft66aA^J^'»St*A'5a^i(ft^j?y3^VS^ V:. v.- . • . •.;V:.:'>!V 



Highest Grade Roses 

We are offering to our local patrons, selection from our large 
stock of finest Roses, especially grown for the Nkw York and Boston 

Ft.OWKR MARKK.rS. 

THE MONTGOMERY CO., Inc., 

HADLEY, MASS. 

TELEPHO}>iES, 

Amherst. 196-R. 
Northampton, 660. 



WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 

In so far as our benefits are mutual. 

THE AMHERST GAS COMPANY 

Everything Ellectrical 



ScDool and College Pf)otograp^crs • . • 




UDIO 



LOO ALLY: 5* Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadley, Mass. 

These Studios offer the best skilled 



Main Office: 

1546-1548 Broadway. 

New York City 



artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



A* I am lilrectljr connect**! with a Whole»»l« 
lioiiiie, I can 

SAVE TOII .MONEY ON CLOTHES 

win l»e nle«8e<l to show mmplea snd Htyle* of 
ff Inter 8uitH aoii OvereoatK. 

H. It. WHITK, 1915. Hunt* Block 
Up One Flight 



STEAM FITTING. Telephone $9-4. 

GAS FITTING. TINNING. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 



Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Mbmorial Windows, 
Lead LuiHTS, &c. 

i Clifton Ave., AMHEK.ST. MASS 



If you want to he 

SOLID WITH THK OIRLN 

you munt have your clothes prcRBCil ami rl«-aned 

AT BPSTBZlf'S 

11 Amity >it. MKHMin Store 

Preaslog and Cleaning a ap«clali> 

Moat liberal ticket ■yatetn In town 



M. D. OILMAN. C. A. MOFTBT. 

TELEPHONE 1079-3. 

GILMAN anti M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 

CONFECTIONERY. 

107 to Sll IfAIIf 8TBBKT. 

Worcester, Mass. 



Tupper, B., West Newton, mana- 
ger of "Wauwlnet" Farm, 

Walker, L. S.. 19 Phillips Street, 
Amherst, Chemist, Massachusetts 
Agricultural College Experiment Sta- 
tion. 

Whitaker. C. L.. 46 Second Ave- 
nue, Pelham, N, Y., president of 
Munson-Whitaker Company. 

Williams, P. F., Auburn. Ala., 
professor of horticulture, Alabama 
State College. 

Wllllls. G. N.. 82 Bromfield Road, 
West Summerville. resident engineeg 
on highway construction. 

Yeaw. F. L., head of department and 
professor of market gardening, Mas- 
;sachusetts Agricultural College. 

nineteen-seven. 

Armstrong. Arthur H., died Dec. 
22, 1908. 

Bartlett, Earle C. Kamehameha 
Schools, Honolulu. T. H., instructor 
in Science and Mathematics. 

Caruthers, John T.. Bordentown, 
N. J., principal Bordentown industrial 
and Agricultural Institute. 

Chace. Wayland F., address 
unknown. 

Chapman. George H., Amherst, 
assistant botanist. Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station. 

Chapman, Joseph O., 276 Andover 
St., North Andover, farmer. 

Clark. Milford A., Jr.. City Hall. 
Buffalo, N. Y., assistant city forester. 

Cutter. Frederick A.. 40 Elm St., 
Orange, N. J., forester. 

Dickinson, Walter E.. Glen Wild, 
La., chemist. 

Eastman, Jasper F., Morrisville, 
N. Y., agronomist New York State 
School of Agriculture. 

Hartford, Archie A.. West Leba- 
non, N. H., teacher of mathematics. 

Hlgglns. Arthur W. Westfield, 
florist. 

King, Clinton, 28 Sagamore St., 
Dorchester, business address. Rooms 
611-613. 6 Beacon St., Boston, 
lawyer. 

Livers, Miss Susie D., 43 Peter 
Parley Road, {amaica Plain, with 
Ginn & Co. , publishers. 

Parker, Charles M., Brookfleld, 
farmer, 

Peters, Frederick S. , Ardmore, 
Pa., landscape forester and entologist. 

Shaw, Edward H., 275 Washington 
St., Belmont, market gardener. 

Summers, John H., Campello, 
department of Agriculture, Bureau of 
Entomology. 

Thompson, Clifford B , Selama, 
Perak, Malay, manager rubber plan- 
tation. 

Walker, James H.. City Hall, 
Newark. N. J., city forester. 

Watkins. Fred A. , West Millbury, 
market gardener. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

Williams Block, Amhekst, Mass. 
OrricR Hours: 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

High-Graiif Coiiej^e IVori' 



LAUNDRY 

shirts. 
Collars, 
Cuffs. - 
Plain wash, 
.Same, rough dry. 



lo 15c 

2C 

ac 
40c per doz 
25c per doz. 



Ralph K. Parker, agent, C. S. C. House, 

85 Pleasant St. 

Francis S. Madison, agent for 1915 and 

short course, Vt-t. Lab. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Fred S. .Merrill, agent, C. S. C. House, 

85 Pleasant St. 
Put full name and address on laundry 



Wright &Ditson 



Headquarters 
tor 



Athletic Supplies 



Pi^fn^f^'nn.s COlllg» StBlllltS 



Golf 

Ba!(k«t Ball 
Foot Rail 
Hockt'T 
Track and 
Field .Sports 




w. a. p»T orr 



and Athletes who 
want the real, su- 
perior articles for 
the various sports 
should Insist upon 
those bearing the 
Wright & Ditson 
Trade Mark 

Catalo(;ue Free 

Wright & Ditson 

334 Washington St. 
Boston 

NewYorIi Chicago 

San Francisco | 

Profidinu CambrMg^ 




CiQ. Vailej SL R]. Lines 

FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers o( the floricul 
tural department. The new green 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations,violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



Watts, Ralph J., Amherst, secre- 
tary to the president of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 

Wood, Herbert P., Dallas, Tex., 
U. S. department of Agriculture, 
Bureau of Entomology. 

NON-CKADATES. 

Brydon, Robert P., Lancaster, 
florist. 

Chadwick, Clifton H., Apartudo 
829, Habana, Cuba, cost and estimat- 
ing engineer, with T. L. Huston Con- 
tracting Co. 

Clementson, Lewis T., 10 Lake 
St., Worcester, clerk. 

Cowles Edward R., Deerfeld, 
farmer. 

Curtis. J. Gerry, 32 1 Coltart Square. 
Pittsburg, Pa., assistant city forester. 

Denham. E. Tirrell. Halifax, florist. 

Engstrom, Nils, 16 Whipple St.. 
Worcester, with the American Steel 
and Wire Co. 

Gould. Harry W.. Millbury, travel- 
ing salesman. 

Hall. Walton. Jr., Modus, Conn., 
cotton mill superintendent. 

Jones, Arthur M., Ludlow, farmer. 

Knox, Harry C. Wellesley, assist- 
ant purchasing agent. 

Pierce. H. T., Juana Diaz, Puerto 
Rico, assistant engineer. P. R. 1. S. 

Russell, Herbert O., North Hadley, 
grower and dealer In onions. 

Searle, George W., Westfield, 
clerk district court .Western Hampden. 

Shaw, Chester L., Middlelwro, 
office, shoe factory. 

Shaw. Frank E., 626 Crescent St. 
Brockton, traveing Salesman. 

Smith. George F.. Barre. farmer. 

Whitney, John F., engineering 
department Boston & Maine railroad, 
St. Johnsbury, Vt.. civil engineer. 

•09. — Homer Cutler, manager 
Carmlchaers dairy. This dairy Is the 
largest between St. Louis and Dallas. 

• 10. — Robert P. Armstrong Is 
teaching In the department of Agricul- 
ture, St. Lawrence University, Can 
ton, N. Y. 




THKf 

SMOOTHEST 



IN a debate, there is no evading 
*■ the issue. Does your smoking 
tobacco bite or doesn't xO 

Velvet is aged 2 years — which 
eliminates the leaf harshness and 
mellows and tones the richness. 
Produces a fine flavor and a 
smoothness that smokers appreci> 
ate above all else. 

Gentlemen — there is only one side 
to this smoke question that's the 
smooth side — "Velvet." Ask 
for Velvet at your dealers. 

SPAULDING & MERRICK 

CHICAGO 



10 



Full Two Ounce Tins 




WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

37 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 



Orchards Pay Better Than Qold Mines When Pertllfzed With 

GENUINE THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER! 



Th« If aksachtttettt SUI« Board *A AfricuUur* Offered a Pri*8 fur the Most Pn^taUa Acr« of 
»l«MachttMtti OrciMrds. Thl« Contest Has Recently CTuied, and Iht 

FRI2B IS WON BV TUB DRBW-WUNSON FUUIT CO.. •! Littleton. Mnoe. 

Th«lr Prize Winninc Acre of Baldwin Apples 

OAVB THBM A TOTAL RBTURN OP |7l8.7a-TMB NET PROFIT WAS ffSIV.SS 



SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from t A. M. to 4 A. M. 



If you are getting the 

THE MOST FOR YOUR MONEY 

then you are eating at the 

O. K., NEXT TO POST OFFICE 

J. W. BOOHB. Prop. 

Have you tried our 25-cent Dinners? 
If not, why not? 



Ji'A'V?LrzL';i'^JVMtt|IIIIE THOmilS PBOSPIIITE PflWDEi.V;oi!.i'>%.UVL?£ 



The Pollowmg letter From Barnes Brothers, the Famous Pryit flroweri and OrchardiMs of 

Valcsvilic, Conn.. Shows That Thomas Phosphate Powder Brings a Priteto 

Every User In the Form of a I'lofitable Crop : 



Th« Co« MottTiMin ComrANV, 

Gentlemen ; . „ . 

In regard to Thommt Pkotpkatt Pomsttr. 

you will recall that we bought of you last year 
130 tont and we wish to say that it gave us mott 
excrlUnt rtiults. On our pMch orchard wMte 
we usmi it, the trtti madt a %f>lfndiii grmrtk 
■attk heavy dark gretn foliagt. Ihf frill was »f 
txcrlltmt color, and the kttpntg\gualHui w*ri rt- 



mark»hU. wkiek wat a dig advantage, especial- 
ly wlien we had o»er iw cars to hariiett in akoul 
two weeks as we harl thi^ year. 

We never imp httttr colored Baldwin Applet 
tkan tkote we grew where we ap/lied a goad 
dreiting of Thomas Phospkate Ptwder. Tke 
best sold at retail for fo oo per barrel. 

Your* truly, 

Barnbs Bkothkhs. 



THERE IS A TRUTH IN ALL THIS POR VOU I 

the whole story is told in the .New Edition of our Booklet. ' Up-To-Oate 
rult Growing," which is sent free If you mention I'Hi Colieci'. Sir.wAt. 



Fruit 



The Coe-MortimerCo.,MVoRTERs5» Chamber St, N.Y. City 

We also distribute from Boston, Mas*.; Bilfast, Maihe; Baltimori, 
Md.; Pmila., Pa.; NonroLK, Va.; Savannah, Ga.; Cha«l«ton, S. C. 



s 



The Coilege Signal, Tuesday. December li, 19U, 



m. J. Lpie, iDG. 



Proprietors of 



HDrO-LIVEeY-HOBSE 

|Rear Draper Hotel 

Northampton. 
Td. 183. 




ASK YOUR 

STATIONER 

FOR 



Ward's Fountain I'ens, Fine Papers 
and Envelopes, Students' Supplies. 
Send for samples of Kngraved Invita- 
tions, Class and Fraternity Paper, 
banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, etc. 

SAMUEL WARD CO. 



WflBD'S 



5763 Franklin Street 
BOSTON 



All Styles of 



SWEATERS 
AND JERSEYS 

TRADE CI ^^B IB MAPK 






Complete Line of 



Athletic Goods 
and BANNERS 



17 South College 



It is but a short time before Christ- 
mas. What could be better than a 
gift of a pair of Moccasins, Moc- 
casin Cruisers or Indoor Moccasins? 

l^tilrmSc it o'ver— tlneirm m&* 



WOOLLEY '14 

Winter Boots and Moccasins 
Indoor Moccasins 

COLLEGE SHOEMAKeT 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fint Repairing a Sptcialty 

Custom Work 

Holland's Block. Phoenix Row 



H 



Massachusetts Afifricultural Gollese 



Trains men for attractive positions in vocations 
that are not overcrowded. 

Tuition is free to residents of Massachusetts. 

Necessary expenses are moderate. 

A CATALOG WILL BE SENT ON REQUEST 



KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 
SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Twelve Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Thirteen Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club. 

Dramatic Society, 

Debating Society, 

Public Speaking Council, 



H. C. Walker, President 

Geo. H. Chapman, Secretary 

C. C. Pearson, Manager 

R. J. Borden, Manager 

R. T. Beers, Manager 

H H, Wood, Manager 

S. M. Jordan, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

O. 0. Anderson. Manager 

F. S. Madison, President 

L. S. Caldwell. President 

J. D. French, Manager 

W. J. Weaver. President 

A. F. McDougall, President 

W. J. Blrdsall. President 

J. M. Heald. President 

T. J. Moreau, President 



]^hen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson 8c. Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



JA CKSON & CUTLER 



Telephone Connection 

TAILOR AND PRESSER 

Fall and Winter Suits 

Chevrons and Stripes 

Put on Military Suits 

Full Dress Suits to Rent 

Gents' Furnishings 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of " Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strlngt 

LKNS GRINDING 

Fulltint of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 

PROMINENCE 

Is given here to the fact that we take 

special care in the posing of 

subjects in order to bring 

out all the good 

features. 

Light and shade is skilfully diffused. 

This and the excellent finish makes 

our PHOTOGRAPHS masterpieces 

of reproductive art. 

SHILURE'S STUDIO. 

142 Main SI., Nortkagipln 

F. C. PLUMB 

Barber 5hop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 



THE TERPSY PARLOR 



CLEANSING. 



REPAIRING. 

Quickest bervloo. Beat Work, Loweat Priea 

All woik carefully done. Work called for and 
delivered. CJenU' overcoati, suit*, pantt koA 
coats. Ladies' tine linen tuita a specialty. 

Wn. FRANKLYN. Prop. 

Rear Nash Bl'k, Amherst. T«l. No. 3«t-4 



CARS 



Lmvc AOaiE COLLEQE for HOL* 
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AieSI & SUNOEBIAND ST. II CO 



THE NEW ENGUND NEWSPAPER 

All the news and the Truth 
about it, in the :: 

Springfield Republican 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 
News fully reported. 

BEST SPORTING PAGES 

The Weekly Republican will be sent 

free for one month to anyone 

wishing to try it. 

Dmity, $8. Sunday, p. fVetJk/y, $I. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEOI 



Vol. XXII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, January 9, 191a. 






No. 13 



WESTERN ALUMNI MEET 

In Successful Banquet at Union League 
Clab, Chicago. 



DRAMATICS TRIP 



HOCKEY VICTORY 



FIRST LEAGUE SHOOT 



During Holidays. 



Successful Recent Over Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Score of gaS Made Ag..n»t University 



Performances. 



The Western Alumni of the Mass- 
achusetts Agricultural College held 
their annual reunion and informal ban- 
quet at the Union League club Chi- 
cago on Friday evening Dec. 8. with 1 
President Butterfleid of the college^ 
and 19 members present. 

Myron H. West '03 president of 
the association presided and after a 
delightful banquet introduced President 
Butterfleid who gave a most Interest- 
ing talk on all the advances at M.A.C., 
and of the loyalty shown the college 
by its ever faithful alumni. 

Other speakers of the evening were 
John E Wilder '82, Pres. W. E. 
Stone '82 of Purdue University, L. 
A. Nichols 71, the oldest member of 
the association and Louis Brandt '10, 
the youngest member. 

The officers elected for the ensuing 
year are ; Myron H. West '03. presi- 
dent; A. F. Shiverick '82. vice-pres- 
ident; Charles A. Tirrell *06, secre- j 
lary and treasurer. 

Letters of greeting from the follow- 
ing clubs and alumni were reaa by tne 
secretary: Dr. John A. Cutter '82, 
secretary of the New YorK club; 
Athenon Clark '77, president of the 
Aiumnl Club of Massachusetts; Pro- 
fessor Clarence E. Gordon, president 
uf the Athletic Association; Frank B. 
Hills, president of the Musical Asso- 
ciation; H. C. Walker, president of 
the Ccllege Senate; Daniel WlUard 
'82, president of the B. & O. R. R., 
Baitimore, Md. 

Greetings, by telegram, were ex- 
changed with the New York Club In 
session on the same evening. 

Those present were: L. A. Nichols 
•71, E. B. Bragg '75, John E. 
Wilder '82, Asa F. Shiverick '82 of 
Chicago, 111. ; Pres. W. E. Stone '82 
of Purdue university, Lafayette, Ind. ; 
Arthur B, Smith '95, H. J.ArmsUong 
'97, P. C, Brooks '01, C. M. Kinney 
'02, Myron H. West '03 of Chicago, 
111. ; W. E. Nottingham '03 of Madi- 
son, Wis. ; Charles A. Tirrell '06 of 
Chicago, III.; H. A. Suhlke '06 of 
Wyandotte, Mich. ; W. A. Cum- 
mlngs '08, H. G. Noble '09 of Chi- 
cago, 111-; J. V. Monahan '09 of 
Lake Bluff, 111.; Lamerl S. Corbett 
'09 of Lexington, Ky.; Louis Brandt 
•10 of Champaign, 111. ; R. L. Grib- 
bin of Sioux City, la. 

Dr. Percy L. Reynolds, former 
physical Instructor at M. A. C. and 
aviator, has accepted the professor- 
ship of Physical Education at the New 
Hampshire State College and will also 
take charge of the athletic teams. 



The Dramatic Society Is at present 



in Fast Game. Score 4-0. 
Captain Peckham's team triumphed 
in the' midst of a busy season, averag- jover the Rensselaer Polytechnic Instl- 
mg one performance a week of George ; tute team Saturday afternoon by a 
BroadhurM's three-act farce-comedy , score of 4 to at Troy. N. Y. The 
"What Happened to Jones." , game was fast and very rough. Mass- 

Durlng the week preceding Christ- j achusetts allowed the home team only 
mas a trip was made In the vicinity of i one shot at our goal. 
New York city, which was a success | In the first half the game was close 
m every way. Though only four per- 1 as far as the scoring counted tbougn 
formances were given they were all to the puck was practically all the ti.ne 
well-filled houses. At Richmond Hill, in R. P.I. territory. Dion at goal 



Long Island, two performances were 
given Saturday. Dec. 16, matinee and 
evening, the evening performance 
being followed by a reception and 
dance. 

Hackensack, N. J. was visited next 
and a very successful perform.ance was 



presented before a fair-sized audience, 
after which a short dance was given 
the cast. 



for the Trojans played a remarkable 
game and It was undoubtedly due to 
him that the score was no larger. 
During the first half both teams skated 
all over the Ice with little advantage 
on either side until Jones caged the 
puck on a pretty shot from the center 



of the rink. 

Sanctuary scored In about two sec- 
onds of play In the second half and 
The most appreciative, and by far | again about five minutes later after 
the largest audience met with on the ■ some sensational team work Wooley 
trip was at Rutherford. N. J. Dec. 18. I ended the scoring with a goal about 

/ 1 f«Mr miniitf«i before time was caled. individual mark ol IV4. v.^apiain 



of Pennsylvania. 

Ttie first match of the year for the 
rifle team was shot off yesterday on 
the ind.or range in the Drill hall, the 
opponei ts being the University of 
Pennsylvania marksmen. Although 
there were but live of last year's team 
shooting yesterday the men averaged 
181.5 compared with 176.1 scored In 
the first match last year. This would 
seem to promise big thiiigs for the 
coming matches and shows that the 
championships won the past two years 
will not be easily relinquished. 

A new rule which went Into effect 
this season allows each team to shoot 
ten men but only the five highest 
scores are counted in deciding the 
match. It is hard to foresee just yet 
whether this will be a handicap or an 
aid to the "Aggie" team. 

The total for yesterday's five high- 
est scort-s was 929 which should be 
ample tu lake the match. Edmlnstef 
was easily high man and hung up an 



direction of a high school reception 
committee, with several towns-ladles 
acting as patronesses. 

This brought to a close the Dramatic 
Society's first trip of any length and so 
successful was it that the Nsw York- 
New jersey trip will be an aunual feat- 
ure of following seasons. 

Saturday night the play was given to ^ 

a large house at Miller's Falls. The j peckham.Capt. right wing, 
next date is Thursday evening at Ware, j Wooley. left wing. 

^^ ^^^^^^ I Jon**' 

SIGNAL COMPETITION 
The standing In the competition for 
membership In the editorial depart- 
ment is as follows : 

1913. 



achusetts ana Dion lor R. 1^. I. I he 
Ice was very rough along the edges, 
greatly handicapping the work of the 
wings. The line-up and summary 
follow : 

R. p. 1. 

Dion. Captain 

Baylcss, Whitney 

Burgar 

Thiessen 

Page 

Van Em an 

McUougal 



MASSACHUSBTTS. 

Ackerman, 
Little, 
Walker. 
Sanctuary. 



goal. 

point, 

c. point, 

center. 



with lb6 each. Captain Uoyd and 
Wilde both secured perfect scores on 
their prone strings. Fo lowing Is the 
team score: 

Off-h*n<t 
86 
95 
83 
84 
91 



F. D. Griggs, 
H- W, Allen, 
P. Serex, Jr., 

C. M. Allen. 
H.J. Clay, 
H. E. Black, 
E. F. Parker. 
R. N. Demond. 
S. B. Freeborn. 



1914. 



1915. 



E. F. Moore, 
G. E. Donnell, 
J. A. Price, 
W. F. Hubbard, 



16.69 

14.80 
10.00 

11.30 
10.64 
5.00 
4.40 
2.70 
2.13 

10.59 
8.80 
6.00 
.70 



rover. 
rmsT HALF. 

Coals. 

1— Maasachusetts, Jones. 

SECOND MALP. 

2— Massachusetts. Sanctuary 
3— Massachusetts, Sanctuary 
4— Massechusetta. WooUay. 
Score — Massachusetts 4 



Time. 
10.00 

.02 

5.10 

11.31 

._._^„ . Rensselaer 0. 

Referee— Callan Goal Umpires— Wood and 
Stevens. Timers- Homer and Heath 
Time— 20 and 15 minute periods. 

ASSEMBLY 

The assembly speaxer for Dec. 13 
was John Noien of Cambridge. 
Mr. Nolen spoke on the art of plan- 
ning and laying out a city so as to get 
the greatest possible beauty without 
detracting from the general utility of 
Us public institutions. 

Mr. Nolen is an expert in city archi- 
tecture, and throughout the lecture 
stereoptlcon views were given which 



Lloyd (Capt ) 

Edmlns'er, 

Wilde. 

Raymond, 

McDougall. 

Grlg(ss. 
JIark. 
Whitmore, 
Forbusft. 

Totals, for five highest scores 



83 

es 

80 
81 



100 
99 

100 
96 
95 
97 
95 
93 
92 



This do.s not 'includ. material «n.- 1 »P"y '"astrated .h. dll..r.nt phases of 



', ten for this Issue. 



the work 

The superiority of many foreign 
cities to our own In the matter of civic 
beauty was very marked. Mr. Nolen 



Lawrence S. Caldwell, 1912, has 
left college and is now taking up spec- 
ial work m the Landscape Art Depart- pointed out how present conditions can 
I ment of Harvard University. i be greatly Improved 



Tottl. 
186 
194 
183 
160 
186 
180 
180 
173 
J73 

: off- 
hand, 440; prone, 489; total. 929; 
average, 185 8. 

The results of the match will not be 
known until next week. The shoot 
was originally scheduled for last week 
out was postponed because of the holi- 
days. Tne match this week will be 
shot off tomorrow afternoon with the 
College of Veterinary Surgeons of 
Washington. D. C. as the opponents. 

CAMPUS CALENDAR 

(NoilcM for this columa should »>« dropped In ih» 
SioiiAL Offlc«or h»nd«d toR. H. VanZwilenburj 
■ 1 3, on or b«for» th« S«turd«y preceding Mchlssua J 

10— 1-30 P. M. Assembly, Prof. 

Wm. D. Hurd. 
n__6.45 P. M. Y. M. C. A. in 

Chapel. 

"What Happened to Jones," 

Ware performance. 
Jan. 13— Hockey, Williams at Wil- 

liamstown. 

No Informal. 
Jan 14- -9- 15 a. m. Chapel. Rev. J. 

S. Lyon of Holyoke. 



Jan. 
Jan. 



MMI 



The College Signal, Tuesday. January 9, 1912, 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 9. '9'^ 



PRESIDENT'S REPORT 

The report of the president has been 
published recently. The main points 
follow. The report divides into three 
fairly distinct portions. 

1. A discussion of some fundamen- 
tal problems of the college. 

2. A review of the year. 

3. A statement of individual needs. 
The report Is followed by the usual 

data concerning students, gifts, etc., 
and by the annual report of the treas- 
urer. 

The fundamental problem discussed 
this year is the general function, or 
mission, of the college. The subject 
Is dealt with under four general heads. 
First, the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College is a ccllege, it is not a school. 
In the second place, the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College is not at 
present, a state university and. in my 
judgment, it ought not to be made a 
state university. Third, the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College is an 
agricultural college and fourth our 
people must understand and this is 
particularly true of the legislature that 
the Massachusetts Agricultural col- 
lege Is a "College of the Common- 
wealth." The purpose of the college 
Is stated as this: "The Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College is designed 
primarily to benefit the agriculture and 
moral life of Massachusetts and inci- 
dentally that of the nation. The mis- 
sion of the college, the president states 
may be achieved tn three ways name- 
ly, — investigation, instruction and ex- 
tension service. Under investigation 
Is included research, experimentation, 
agricultural surveys, economic and 
social investigation. Instruction in- 
cludes the preparation for the agricul- 
tural vocations, training for citizenship 
and the training of the man himself. 
The Extension service is next dis- 
cussed and Its mission is explained by 
the statement of one of the trustees 
"the state is our class-room. "' 

The president cbses the first sec- 
tion of his report with a discussion of 
the relationships of the college to the 
public school, to agricultural teaching, 
to normal schools to the state board of 
agriculture and to voluntary associa- 
tions as the grange and village im- 
provement societies. 

The second section of the report 
gives a review of the year, touching 
attendance, appropriations, the new 
dairy building, commencement, sum- 
mer and winter schools, tuition, de- 
partment of instruction, the graduate 
school, the experiment station, the ex- 
tention department, with a complete 
report of the changes in the adminis- 
trative department. 

The third section of the report deals 
with the immediate needs of the col. 
lege, and is perhaps best expressed by 
a resume of the legislative budget for 
1912. 

Legislative Budget of 1912. 
Current funds available for fiscal 
year Dec. 1912 to Dec. 1913. 



Iierns Present Increase 

approp. asked 

Administration $2500 $ 5000 
Maintenance and 

equipment 58000 27000 

Investigations 10500 14000 

Instruction 60000 23000 
Short courses and 

extension 20000 30000 

Inspection service 3000 



Total 
atkad 

$30000 

95000 
24500 
83000 

50000 
3000 



$176500 $109000 $285500 
Special appropriations. 1912. 
Agricultural building and equipment $200000 
Student dormitory 25000 

Addition to French Hall 25000 

Addition to Draper Hall 25000 

Dwelling house for Registrar 8000 

Tenement house for farm help 6000 

Sewers 10000 

New equipment 31S25 

Repairs and minor improvements 20760 
General improvements 135125 

$386420 
The remainder of the report Is de- 
voted to statistics and the treasurer's 
report as follows: 

Report of treasurer for fiscal year 
ending Nov. 30, 191 1. The year has 
been one of great activity with increased ' 
receipts and disbursements. 
Current account 

disbursement, 1910, $179,537.70 

Current account 

disbursement. 1911. 215.941.81 

Summary of fiscal year shows 

cash on hand 5 066.60 

Ejtp Station disbursements. 1911. 64,986.68 
Exp. Station disbursemenis. 1910, 61.674.64 

Special appropriations disbursements 

of $94,745.20 divided principally 
between : 

Zoology building 13.246.32 

Animal husbandry 5,833 65 

Dairy building f 1.014.99 

Pomological laboratory 10.76662 

Poultry husbandry 5.001 00 

Equipment for Ent. and Zo. 9,!27.8l 

Cranberry investigation 2,200.69 

Repairs and Improvements 25.975 23 

Equipment 10,371.10 

Architects' fees 1. 197. 79 

Division of agriculture has had a 
successful year. Its appropriation was 
reduced $1 ,000, making only $4,000 
total. 

Total receipts for you 
Total disbursements 
Credit balance of 

Inventory of quick 
increase of $1,000.00. 

Horticultural division : 
Apportionment 
Receipts 
Disbursements 
Credit balance 

Inventory of qutclt assets. 1910. 
Inventory of quick assets. 1911. 

Inventory summary: 
Land 

College buildings 
Equipment 
Exp. Station building 
Exp. Station equipment 



UP-TO-DATE 

* COLLEGE FOOTWEAR * 



Elite Shoes, 
Swell Shod Shoes, 
Pumps the fit, - 



$3.50 to $5.00 

- $5.00 and $6.cx) 

$4.00 



EXPERT REPAIRING 



PAGE'S Shoe Store, 



BETWEEN THE BANKS 



HARRISON'S NURSERIES... 

Berlin, Maryland. 
Have over two thousand acres in Nursery Stock. 
They offer a book on 

HOW TO GROW AND MARKET FRDIT 

For 50 cents. 

All prospective buyers are invited to visit the 

Nursery. 

They are the largest growers of fruit trees in 

this country. 



19.052.37 
22.778.40 
11.278.62 

assets show 



10.259.00 
7.131.07 

16.150 56 

1 1490 07 

496 00 

1.064.00 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, iBd PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 




AMHERST BOOK STORE 



69.729 99 

519,070.00 

256,656.44 

57.950.C0 

58.328 08 



Total. 1911 
Total. 1910 



$961.724 51 
$883 222.64 



METTAWAMPE TREK 



The Mettawampe trek last Saturday 
was under the leadership of Professor 
Hicks who led the tramp to Cushman. 
and over the hills to the east, thence 
to the college rifle range and back to 
the campus. 



Kodaks, 

Eastman Films, 

Victor Talking 
Machines, 

Victor Eecords, 

Fountain 
Pens, 

Leather Goods. 



MI__^, 

rnOTOGRlPHER 

The best workmanship, 

The latest styles, 

Reasonable prices 

Lincoln Building, Amherst, Mast. 



The Prospect House 



PERRY'8- 



The place to eat after the game. 
.Attractive tables and rooms. Excel- 
lent service. Catering a specialty. 



MRS. E. E. PERRY 



There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 



DEUEL'S 

DRUG STORE 



O 



O A L 



Of 



C. R. ELDER 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



^E. N. PARISEAU,^ 

Barber j^ Shop 

RAZORS HONED 



No. 2 PIcaaant, St., Amherat, Maa». 
THE 

Hoover & Smith Go. 

616 Chettnot St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 

Philadelphia's Offlelal Fraternltj Jeweler 



8PEOIALI8T8 IN 
Pratemity Badges, Fobs. Novelties, 

Rings. Charms Prises Trophies 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals. 

Rings, Charms.'. 



RIFLE SCHEDULE 

Owing to the fact that the National 
Intercollegiate Association has been 
divided into an Eastern and Western 
league, and that several new colleges 
have entered the association, our 
schedule for the year Is somewhat 
altered. There have been sev- 
eral important changes in the rules, 
among */hlch is the following : Any 
number of men up to ten may shoot, 
the best five scores counting for the 
team score. The championship is to 
be decided by a match between the 
winning team of each league. Our 
schedule includes matches with eleven 
eastern colleges and universities, and 
is as follows : 

Jan. 6. University of Pennsylvania. 
13, College of Vet. Surgeons. 
20. Delaware College. 
27, Harvard University. 
3, Maryland Agric. College. 
10. W. Virginia University. 
17, New Hampshire College, 
24. N. Georgia Agric. College. 
2, Norwich University. 
9, Louisiana State University. 
16. Princeton University. 
The team has been holding regular 
practice for some time and as a result 
the following men have been picked : 
Captain Lloyd. MacDougall, Edmin- 
stcr, Wilde, Raymond, Forbush. 
Griggs, Clark, Hyde and Whitmore. 
Sergeant Lee is coaching the team 
and will act as official scorer. 



Feb. 



Mar. 





THE STORE 

FOR 

ETTER 
CLOTHES! 



Clothing Heavily Reduced 

Tlx-re are plenty of t lotht- s Sales these days, hut there's as much difTerence 
between them and their methods, and what they really mean-an.l what you kcI lor 
your money-as there is between the Clothes themselves, \Vc arc now holdmg our 

Semi-Annual Clearance Sale 

which means that 200 Men's Higl.(irade .Suits and 120 Men's Overcoats will be 

sold at 15 off from regular price 
20 Suits and Overcoats at $1600 18 Suits and Overcoats at I14 40 

All Suits and Overcoats at the same discount 
It's the buying opportunity of the year Don't miss it 

SANDERSON & THOMPSON 




The Worthy. 



FRANK H. DANFORTII. Mor. 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 




i N.Y. 



Makers 

•f 



__ OOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the At- 
» <>. ■ II lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 

AmherM Corner In Ralhskellar. 's*jedaily 



M. B. MAGRATH &S0N 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 

Orders left at tlie Amherit Houm will receive 
prompt attention 



Toefil Mientka, 

Boot and Shoe Repairing, 

Done while you wait. 
Aiislit*r«»t, IVI»swa». 



Bac!<: jffom. (iv? lyoJidays 

!. take* off the rough edge of the 
"ijrin'-l" t'» fin 1 the welcome pack- 
age of Fatima Cigarettes. 



Wnh fah t>arl,aef of /■'<rf'/n<i WU f ' " P'"- 
r-iiH ■:'Hit)nn,25 i f i hi haerjte a Aii /.of*' 
fiiUolltfefiennanl fJx3J' - xlextionof 1 00. 



20 for 
IS cents 



^^PUT YOUR FEET ON EASY STREET' 

Gilbert's Adjustable Arch Cushions 

Should be worn by everyone suffering from '• Flat F<x,l '• as well as those 
whose arches are just l^eginning to break down Made without heav> metal 
narts to hurt or rubber to sweat the feet, and in such a manner that the 
elevation can be changed. Very light in weight and always comfortable. 

i^fioo imi.oo 

No More Cold Feet. Wear 

THE PROTEX HAIR INSOLES 

Best protection against cold and dampness. 

"THE RAJAH FIBRE INSOLES" 

Are warm in winter and cool in the summer, consequently give i>erfe< l foot 

comfort. They outwear the shoes. 

Henry Adams & Co. 



hA 



MMMM^I^iaiMl 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 9, 191a. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 9, 191 2. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOAKD OF BDIT0B8. 



this fact the question arises is it best 
to have one man of recognized ability 
occupying a number of positions all of 
which he is obliged to slight, or would 
it be better to have a number of men 
who, although they may not have the 
ability of the first, are able to give their 
entire time and effort to the single j naay be found at 
in which they are engaged. I — — i 

the latter 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



ALDEN C BRETT. 1912 E<J«or-ln-ChW 

R. H. VANZWALENBURC 13. Assistant Editor 
JESSECARPENTER.JR 1912 fManartng Editor 
MARSHALL C. PRATT. 1912. Competition Editor j activity 
ROYAL N. HALLOWELL, 1912. Athletics. _. . 

JOSEPH A. HARLOW. 1912. Athletics, c-xperience has shown that 

OSCAR G. ANDERSON. 1913. Ahimni Notes, course is the better. This condition of 

SILAS WILLIAMS 191?. Oepartntent Notes. ! ., . 

s. MILLER JORDAN 1913. Cciieee Notes. | ^"^"'s operative here at present can 

I be remedied only by the installation 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. of the "point system. " Under this 

ALBERT w.DODCE. 1912 Business Mansgfer. scheme each of the College activities 

GEORGE ZABRISK IE 1913 Assf. Bus. Manager ... 

ERNEST s. CI *RK jR 1914, Circulation. '^ assigned a Certain number of points 
CHESTER E. WHEELER. 1914 cimiiatioii. according to Its importance and the 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 



E W E L L'S 




STUART B. FOSTER, l'?!4 



C'rcirfsttoii. 



Subscrfptton $1 50 per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Albert W. Dodge. 

Entered as second-clsss maner st the Amkersl 

Hm omm. 



Vol. XXII. TUESDAY. JAN. 9. No. 13 



Subscriptions 

IQII-IS. 



are now due for 



The Signal wishes to second hear- 
tily the sentiments expressed in Pres- 
ident Butterfield's communication in 
this Issue and to unite with him In 
commending Dettmar Jones for his 
heroic action. 



time it lakes to perform. A certain 
maximum is set and no man may 
carry more than that number of points. 
This is simply the application of a 
rule in force in the academic depart- 
ment, to the student activities ; a man 
may take only a certain number of 
credit hours in the one, why should 
not the same be true of the other? 
It has been impossible to enforce any 
regulations of this kind in the past 
because of the sinall number of stu- I 
dents in the college, but with a regis- | 
tration of 500 at present and a promise j 
of even larger entering classes in the 
future such a system can be very sat- 1 
isfactorily operated. That it could be ' 



PARKS. 

FLORIST, 

Flowers for all occcasions. 
Mail 



It's a good thing not to worry about 
your pedal apparel, its correct, style 
comfort or durability. 

Buy your shoes from 

The Shop Thanias The Style 

" Walk Over, " Haywood Shoes 

i3-50f $4-00, $5.00 



or 



given 



telephone orders 
prompt attention. 

239 Main St., Northiiptoi 



Bolles " Special, " Stetson Shoes, 

fS'OO to 18.00 



[ made a success is shown by the expe- 

The communication concerning ath- j rlence of other colleges in which it is 
letics In this issue we think strikes the in operation, the chief among these 
key note of the situation. The mem- 1 being the Massachusetts Institute of 
bers of the faculty have asked -Why j Technology. Here the scheme has ' 

been In use for four years and is 



should an athlete receive more atten- 
tion than any other man?" The 
answer is absolutely simple because 
he is doing more for his college. 
Athletics are a part of college activity 
and must be supported by the students 
and recognized by the faculty. 



accomplishing the desired results. 



The following clipping from the 
Boston Globe may explain one of the 
reasons why we need an enclosed 
athletic field. 

"PROFIT IN WESLEYAN FOOTBALL. 

For the second time in the history 
of football at Wesleyan University the 
season this year close-i with a profit. 
The treasury shows a balance above 
all expenses of $2000. A profit was 
made for the first time in 1905, when 
$200 was cleared. Of this year's 
surplus $500 will be expended on ten- 
nis courts for the use of students not 
members of an athietic team." 



We have today In this college a sit- 
uation which Is quite common In the 
smaller institutions and which in gen- 
eral acts to the detriment of the Insti- 
tution. The highest posltion.s in the 
various branches of student activity 
are held by a comparatively few men. 
Perhaps the man who is captain of an 
athletic team is also editor-in-chief of 
the college paper or manager of a dra- 
matic or musical organization. It Is 
utterly impossible for this man to 
devote his entire time and best efforts 
to both these activitier> and either one 
or the other must suffer. In view of 



COLLEGE NOTES 

Professor Cance was the Y. M. C. 
A. speaker Thursday evening. 

T, A. Nicolet has been elected 
assistant business manager of the I9I4 
fndtx. 

The winter school has opened with 
an attendance of 131, a record 
number. 

The speaker at Chapel on Sunday 
morning was Robert E. Speer of New 
York city. 

A reception to the short course stu- 
dents was given by the faculty In the 
Union Room, Tuesday night. 

The Social Union whist smoker from 
Saturday night was called off owing to 
the lack of heat in the Drill Hall. 

Dates scheduled for Dramatics at 
present include Ware, Jan. I I ; Green- 
field. Feb. 7th ; Northampton. Feb. 
I5ih. 

"Physical torture" classes started 

Monday. There is little doubt that 

i Mettawampe treks will become popular ! 

I —for the time being. i 

I The return of cold weather and ' 

good ire has given the hockey team a 

chance for the practise which it has, 

long looked forward to. 

The first collegiate hockey game 

with Rennsalear — was a victory. 
There is still chance for a clean slate 
at the end of the season. 



j STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

j RUGS 

CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New y^. 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



KKPAIKINr. DEPARTMtM 

E. M. BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Next to Corner iJrug Store. 



Angier, '13. 



Clark, ',3, 



We have a full line of Banner*, Post 
Cards, College Songs, Seal Papers, Foun 
tain Pens, Candy. Tonic and Student 
.Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

RASKMCNT OF NO. COLLECfK 



Eld ridge, '14. 



Tarbeli, '14. 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. 

Amherst, 



Phillips Block 
Mass. 



C&rp^n-ter St Morehousf, 

PRIMTET^S, 



No I, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Maaa. 



H. E. 



KINSMAN, 

College PDotograpDer 



NASH BLOCK, MAIN ST., 
AMHERST, 



MASS. 



High-gradf artistic work. Perfect satisfaction guaranteed 

Studio newly equipped with large sky light 

and special lense for large 

groups. 

All styles the latest. Fine picture framing. 



Harold F. Hadfield '14, of North 
•iianis was chosen as first alternate 
f r a West Point cadetship in Berk- 
shire County and expects to take fur- ' 
ther examinations in the spring. | 

During the week, a number of the | 
Jaily newspapers have been put into ; 
' Social Union room. It is under-, 
Mocd that the current numbers of the 
popular magazines will be added in the 
iiear future. 

Paul V. Kane '15 of Worcester 
was recently selected by Congressman 
John A. Thayer for the West Point 
adetship from Worcester County. 
He formerly won a cadetship tc An- 
napolis, but was rejected because of 
a physical difficulty. 

The Stockbridgc club meeting 
scheduled to be held last Tuesday 
"vening. was postponed to this week. 
At 6-45 In room G. South college. 
Berjamin F. Hubert ';2, will address 
the club, this evening, on • Agricul- 
ture and Agricultural Conditions of the 
South." 

Q. T. V. held its Initiation banquet 
at the Prospect House Thursday night 
.nd Kappa Sigma held Us the fol- 
lowing evening at the satne place. 
Beta Kappa Phi went to the Warren 
at South Deerfleld Friday night and 
Kappa Gamma Phi took possession of 
the Amherst House Saturday night. 

With the return of the gymnasium 
eason. basketball has come into new 
life. Already the "Windjammers" of 
the senior class have accepted a chal- 
enge of the "Intermediates" of the 
Junior class for the light weight basket- 
ball championship of the college. 
Both teams are said to average 140 
pounds. The game is called at 7 p.m. 
Thursday in the drill hall. 



COMMUNICATIONS 

'GomiTiunic«tlon» to th« Siowal concerning nM- 
•f«ol fwwral imer«tt «r« welcaffied. Th# Siomal 
11 not tab* lMrt4 r*sponiibI« for Itia optnlont thua 

.KprMMd > 

Edttor College Signal: 

Dear Sir 

Your last Issue In December con- 
tained an editorial on athletic deficien- 
cies which interests me much. While 
I do not agree with all the statements! 
in this article, I doubt if it would be I 
advisable for me to discuss questions | 
of that nature in this letter. I rather ; 
speak of what seems to be the center 
of the difficulty, namely : How can . 
men interested In college activities be 
l^ept up in their scholarship ? 

I think it may be taken for granted 
that any student who gives his time to 
the representation of the college in a 
student activity, football, hockey 
Signal, etc. is entitled to some extra 
consideration on the part of the instruc- 
tor. And that if the instructor knows 
just which of his students are partici- 
pating in these activities he will take 
particular pains to see that they are 
kept up In their work. The instructor 
should know at once, upon the opening 
of the college in the fall, which stu- 
dents are expecting to participate in 



football. The members of the hockey 
team should be designated to the 
instructor as early as Nov. 1st and 
those who expect to play baseball 
should be announced soon after the 
opening of the second semester. 

That this knowledge is not available 
to the instructor at the present time 
appears from my recent experience 
with the hockey team candidates. 
Just prior to the Christmas vacation 
land, I understand, less than a week 
; before a game, a Hit of hockey men 
i came to me. It was my first knowl- 
: edge that some of my students were 
! engaged in this activity. A few were 
j below passing grade in scholarship and 
j were so reported to the Dean. Our 
I course is so directed as to bring all the 
I men possible up on their feet at the 
: end of the semester. Had a list of 
'. the hocl<ey men been in our hands six 
j weeks sooner it is quite safe to say that 
I no hockey men need have been defi- 
cient when wanted for that sport. 
Each deficient man would have been 
sought out and by a little special atten- 
tion to his particular difficulties, help : 
to get the necessary grasp on his work. 
Now as to the method of finding out 
who are the men interested in the 
different college activities, whetiier 
through the Dean's office or by means 
of the stud'-nt organizations, personally 
1 like to confer with the student mana- 
gers concerning men in my courses 
who may be needed to r-present the 
[college, and the ways ard means of 
keeping them up m th'ir Wirk. 
I The existing corditiors which made 
i the editorial in your last issue neces- 
! sary are to be regretted but would they 
1 not have been alleviated had the 
instructors known six weeks sooner 
who were expected to play on the 
hockey team ? 

Let the faculty have, by ail means, 
early next semester a list of the bas6>- 
ball men and see if we do not do better. 
Yours cordially. 

C. A. Peters. 



"Crops With The 
Guesswork LeH Out" 

TIE FUST EIGjIT PI12E MOPS OF COIH OH STtCKOBlDEE: 

if« 4bu->tM-ls tiarv.-si»-.l. 112.AS Imslifls rut dn rollinsvilte, t'onii. 



\H 



no 

int.\ " 

nil " 

Sg.7 •• 



84 Q 

8b. m 
7795 



MoiinuiutI). Ml" 
I it .iiiliv. M"*^ 
M.i.lhury, N II 
S |»e.'tlMl(l. M.I".'. 
"« liceitirld, M.i*!> 
\ I astnii. M«»* 
Kri.fktoii, Mams. 



" This s/n*ws that the soils of SfassiuhuMli^ -//*• not yet rfa4y toh* 
aha,utoHed'' DR. //• W WILEY 

A i 2-page illustrated pamphlet givi: g full 
particulars will be sent to any address 



)' 



IV 11 



BOWKER 



Fertilizer Company 

43 Chatham St. Boston 



F. A. SHERARD. 

MEN'S STORE 



Kuppentieinier's 
Fine Clothes 



FURNKSIIINGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOM TAILORING A SPECIALTT 

Thomas Hemenway. 'la, M. A. C. Representative 





To THE Editor of the Signal: 

Dear Sir: 

1 want to express publicly the thought 
that I know is in the minds of all our 
faculty and students with respect to 
the efficient and heroic action of Mr. 
Dettmar Jones a week ago in Melrose. 
I am told by witnesses that he suc- 
ceeded in pulling seven or eight boys 
out of the water, in addition to rescu- 
ing the Flagg boy before life was totally 
extinct. All this was done with the 
aid of other boys who were present, 
j but the leadership was undertaken by 
Mr. Jones, who directed affairs and, 
from ail I can hear, is mainly responsi- 
ble for the small loss of life. 

1 have no doubt that Mr. Jones 
would prefer that no public attention 
should be given to his act. but 1 can- 
not forbear this much of praise for his 
splendid service which not only reflects 
the highest credit on himself as a man. 
, but necessarily also reflects credit on 
his college. 
I Yours very truly, 

Kenyon L. Butterfield, 

President. 

Jan. 6, 1912. 

I 



yOC/ WtLL FIND 



DUDLEY 



» turn r IKK in 



A FULL UNE fifle AtMetlc Goorfs 

Oi^ ^^^ EVERY SPORT 




TOBACCO 



— AT 




"THt DtST In Tut World' 
Write for cataloge. 



The College Drug Store 



Cliafles H. Dudley 

HAXC)VKK, - N. H. 

Agent, HAZRN M4 



The College Signal. Tuesday, Jauuary 9, 1912. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 9, 191a. 



SHORT COURSES COMMENCED. | 

j The total number now registered for 
.......... 1., ,._ui/^ ..«^. and am interested in NEW ENGLAN I) 

l^^^56c^^.^^^.^^.*«^*»e>66.;yy^^:>^ winter Short Course is 120, with a AGRICULTURE and have devoted , 

few more who have not yet entered. Special Department of my busines. i„ 

Many men from the best insti- the handling of FARMS and COUN- 

tutions in the East have come TRY HOMES with F. P. MARSTON. 

here to take these special aeri- "^^ " '8'. »» '"Manager- Correspondence 

,...i„,r.i ^« A J / L., solicited. Send for RAYMOND'S RED 

cultural courses. As evidence of ths; 1 , ^^^.,-,0 l- j ^- . ., 

. , • LhTIER, I-arm and Country Home 

the registration shows eight Harvard Kdition. Reliable agents wanted. 




GOODS FOR MEN. 



C. & K. Derby 8, 
Reiser Cravats, 



English and Scotch Woolens. 

TH£ BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 



*xSA^> 



Highest Grade Roses 

We are offering to our local patrons, selection from our large 
stock of finest Roses, especially grown for the Nkw York and B«)sroN 
Flowkr Markeis. 

THE MONTGOMERY CO., Inc., 

HADLEY, MASS. 

TELEPHONES. 

Amhemt. 196-R. 
hJorthampton. 6t»0. 



WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 



THE 



In so far as* our benefits are mutual. 

AMHERST CAS COMPANY 

Everything Electrical 



School and College Photosrapbcrs . . 



men, two from Yale, one from Boston 
University, one from Wesleyan, and 
tone from University of Washington, 
j with six or more others from other in- 
stitutions scattered over the United 
States. The list also includes sev- 
several of the most progressive farm- 
ers of the state, as well as a number | Williams Block, 
of retired business men, who have de- 
cided to take up farming for profit 
as well as for pleasure. The depart- 
ment is congratulating itself on being 
able to draw out men who are doing 
things on a large scale as well as those 
who are occupied in ordinary lines of 
endeavor. 

A strong feature of the Winter 
Course is th- poultry course which the 
college is able to offer for the first 
time, but the course is necessary limi- 
ted to 32, because of limited labora- 
tory faculties. 

The special course in Horticulture 
has attracted unusually large num- 
Dcrs, several coming to this froin out- 
side the state. 

In general, the good work done by 
the Winter Courses In past years 
IS tesilfed to strongly by the long 
waiting list of men who have been re- 
fused entrance ^eciuse of lack of room. 



T. H. RAYMOND 

Central Square, Cambridge, Mass 

E. B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

Amherst, Mas^. 

OrricE IIocRs: 




LOCALLY: 52 Center St. 



Main Office; 

1546-1548 Kroadway. 

New York City 



Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadley. Mass. 

These -Studios offer the best skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



A* I »m 'tlrertlv ponnect«><l w Ith a WholpM»le 
HotiM'. I con 

SAVK YOl MONEY ON CLOTH KS 

will lie iiIphwiI to show »niii|ilis nml Htyleisof 
Winter Hint- .tihI Overcoav^ 

11 H. WHITK, I'M.-.. Ilunt» Blcwk 
Up One FItglit 



STEAM FrrT!?in. 

GASFIT I INfr. lINMNf, 



Telephone $9—4. 



If yon wnnt to lie 

SOI.ll> UITH THK lilKI.s 

jrou roust have \ imr ilothes prcs ii| an<l fli mied 

AT EFSTSIN'S 

11 Amity .Ht. .Maroon Shire 

Pre«»ing ami Clennlnf; a tipt daltv 

MoKt lilteral tickfi MymUtn in town 



M. A. C. CLUB OF WORCESTER. 

A meeting of some 35 members of 
the alumni and about 20 undergradu- 
ates was held in Worcester during the 
past vacation at which plans were for- 
mulated for the organization cf an 
M. A. C. club of Worcester. The 
leaders tn this movement have consid- 
ered that the time for such a formation 
is excellent and are putting every effort 
into it in order to make the club a 
success. Plans are on foot to give a 
reception to the baseball teatn when 
the team visits Worcester to play 
Holy Cross next spring. The leaders 
are Rev. Henry Hague 75, R. W. 
Morse '01 and Edgar E. Thompson'7l. 



FOR FARMS ! 

Big, Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building Lots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W R BROWN 

Savings Bank Rl'k, 

Amherst. Ma*» 

AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

Ht<rh-Graiic Cpi/t-^e J for I: 
LAUNDRY 



Shirt*, 
Collars, 
CutTs, - 
Plaiti wash, 
Same, rough dry. 



10-15C 

2C 

»c 
40c per do/ 
- 25c per do/ 



Kalph R Parker, agent, C. S. C. House 

S5 I'leas.-iiit St. 

Francis S .Madi.son, .igent for i(,i5 and 

.short course, Vet. Lab. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Fred S Merrill, agent, C. S. C. Hou.se, 

85 Pleasant St. 
Put full name and address on laundry 



Wriglit&Ditson 



Headquarters 
tor 



CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

RLUMBERS. 



M.D. OILMAN. 

TELEPHONE 



c. A. MorrnT. 
1079.3. 



Specialty of Kepairing 

Chi'RCh Windows, 

ME.MnRIAI, WlNUOW;. 

Lead LKiUTS, &c. 
* Clifton Ave. AMHKKST. MASS 



GILMAN and M OFFET, 

.Manufacturers of and Wholrsale Dealers 

CONFECTIONERY. 

307 to 311 Maim 6thket. 

Worcester, Mass. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES. 

ENTOH«OLCCY, 

Prof. H. T. Fernald ; W. S. Regan ; 
O, C. Bartlett and L. S. McLaine at- 
tended the meeting of the •• American 
association for the Advancement of 
Science and Affiliated Societies" at 
Washington. D. C. 

J. H. Merrill has just accepted a 
position as assistant entomologist of ■ 
the Kansas experiment station, and 
will leave for this new field of work on 
Feb. 1st. 

PHYSICS. 

The following apparatus has been 
added to the Physical Laboratory 
equipment : 



Base Ball 

Lawn Ten 
Golf 

Basket Ball 
Foot Ball 
Hockey 
Track and 
Field Sports 



Athletic Supplies 




„„ College Students 
and Athletes who 
want the real, su- 
perior articles tor 
the larious sports^ 
should Insist upon*T'.r 
those bearing the 
Wright & DItson 
Trade Mark 



Catalogue Free 

Wright & DItson 

334 Washington Street, Boston 

Now Yorli ^ Chicago 

Sir Francisco 
Proildence Cambridge 

K. H. Powers, Agent, 9 South 



IS •.: S\ 
BUS - 1 




A Hart Optical Disc, diffraction 
grating, optical bench completely 
\ equipped for accurate work in photo- 
metry and for verifying the laws of 
reflection and refraction, tuning fork, 
micrometer screw for level tests, four 
sets of universal weights, torsion ap- 
paratus, six ungraduated thermometers, 
and a demonstration electric conden- 
ser, 

Chester A. Butman of the Depart- 
ment of Physics has returned from 
Washington, D. C, where he pre- 
sented the results of his researches 
on the production of electrons from 
phosphorescent materials, before the 
American Physical Society and Sec- 
tion B. of the American Association 
for the Advancement of Science. 



Conii. Valley St. % \m 

FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
lural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

27 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ALUMNI NOTES 

NOTICE NINTEEN- EIGHT, 

The fourth class letter is now in 
course of preparation. Those who 
have not as yet sent in their letters 
will greatly facilitate this work by so 
doing. Address all communications 
to the secretary to J. A. Hyslop, the 
Cavendish Apartments, 1628 Colum- 
bia Road, Washington, D. C. 

'92. — Born Oct, 27. a son Richard 
Carley to Dr. and Mrs. W. Boynton of 
Springfield. 

'08.— The December number of the 
Illinois Agriculturist, which Is devoted 
largely to horticultural matters, has 
an article by E. W. Bailey, on "Ex- 
hibitlon Fruits and the Value of Fruit 
Exhibits" ; also an artlcb by Louis 
Brandt '10 on • -Street Tree Planting." 

'09.— Benjamin F. Barnes was 
married Dec. 12. to Miss Charlotte 
W. Haynes of Haverhill. Mr. and 
Mrs Barnes will live at 200 Boardman 
street, Haverhlil. 

'10. — W. R. Clark is enjoying a 
trip to the Panama canal zone. 

'10. — Botn to Mr. and Mrs. G. W. 
Paulsen, a daughter. 

Next week an address directory for 
the class of 19 11 will be published in 
this column. 

Comparatively few copies of the 
1913 Index now remain on hand and 
alumni who are desirous of securing 
this annual are urged to place 
Ian order at their earliest convenience. 
Price postpaid $2.00. 

Among the alumni seen about 
campus during the week were Park 
W. Farrar '08 of Rogerson. Idaho, 
David L. Larsen '08 of Honolulu, 
Harold G. Noble *09 of Chicago, III. , 
E. J. Burke '10 of Hadley, Frank T. 
Haynes '10 of Sturbridge, H. H. 
Howe ex- 11 of Boise, Idaho and 1. 
W. Davis '11 of Mlddlebury, Vt. 



ICE CREAM, 



Chsf^ onfy fr^m t A. M. to 4 A. M. 



If you are gettinR the 

THE MOST FOR YOUR MONEY 

then you are eating at the 

O. K., NEXT TO POST OFFICE 

J. W. KOUSE, frop. 

Have you tried our 2S-cent Dinners? 
If not, why not ? 




THE 
SMOOTHEST 





FuU 
2 oz. Tins 



A CHECKMATE to vour smoke 
that biles and burnbl Veivtl the 
selected tender middle leaf i»ge<j it the 
L'af over two years I'rmiuciiigarrifliowtK .^sthal 
only tlif* measured p^Kf of liriie ran f-mcMnpas^ 
A llavor anJ «noolhnf-.s Ircm ndoiis'v grjodl 

I'ipe fimoking with VMvet it a levcUlion — 
proving that time only can make tobacco whiU 
we would «U have it — smooth. 

"Your Move!" 

At »n dpalem. 

SPAULDING & MERRICK 

CHICAC9 



10 



Orchards Pay Better Than OoM Mines When l-ertllUed With 

GENUINE THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER! 

Tto MaMKKhHMttsSUte H«*ra of AKncutmrs Offered a Itite for the Most I'rofiUble Acr««»l 
4 »•« tCbutetts Orclurd^. Ihii Content \\a\ Recently <-l<.Ned. and ftie 

f>R^ B WOfN BY TMR DKKW IHUNSON FRUIT C«.. •! L»tll»to«. Mm*. 

Their PrUe Winninf Acre ol Baldwin Apple* 

OAVE THEM A TOTAL RETURN OF »7IS.70-TI1R NET PROFIT WA« »SI9.M 



fgi'r?L^.z".>'wlVMiE|IOII(E THlinilS PH08PHIITE POWDEi:Jo,'i's'>¥KVc??. 



The P.il.wmi tvti-r Krom B*rnM Brother*, the Pamou-. Kruit Growers and « )tch.rd»«» of 

Valesyill*. fonn.. Show* I h4t ThomM* Pho%ph.ite Powder Brinf* a Pnxe to 

Every User in the lorni of a I'rofitable Crop : 



TMF. CoK MOHTIMPR CowrAWV, 

Gentlemen ; _. . ^ ^ 

Int^Kardto Thomas Phetphate Ptnvder. 

vou will retail that we l>ouKht of you la»t year 
\yitons and w.- wuh to say th*t it K-»ve us most 
\exctUfnt results. On our pe^ch or< hard wh.-ee 
we us-d It. tlie trees made a sflendid grffwt* 
wtth heavy dark green folia^t. the fruit trns »f 
exceUemI color, and the ieeptngquahties were r#- 



markitHe. which was a hif advaHlngt, esjieeial- 
ly when »c had rivi«r i;o tars to harvest in aPomt 
rtKO »»»#*» a» we had this vear. 

IVe nerer s/nr /ifftrr ,<>lored Patdwtn Affles 
than thou we grew where we aPfhed a gond 
dressing cf Thnrnas f'htnphate Fonder The 
best sold at retail for p^.ao per barrel. 

Vour* truly, 

Baknps BKMTiiraa. 



THERE IS A TRUTH IN ALL THIS FOR VOU I 

Ihe whole story i»t<.ld in the New Kdition of our Booklet. 'Up -I o-I)ate 
Fruit Growing," which is sent free if you mention iHE Coti.FGK .Signal. 

The Coe-Mortimer Co., m'to inters 5 « Chatnher St., N. Y. City 

We also distribute from Boston. Mass.; Bblfast. Mainh; Bai.timorb, 
Md.; Phila.. Pa.; NoRroLK, Va.; Savannah, Ga.; Cmarlston, S. C. 



s 



BttB 



aBHBBaassi 



8 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 9, 1912. 



U. J. Laporle, IDC. ""^ e.e.millett 

Massachusetts Agricultural College '^"'^^ ^"' °""^" 

flOfo-my-HORSEi 



jJ^t-ar ri taper Hotel 
Northamj)ton. 

lel. i8j. 



ASK YOUR 

STATIONER 

FOR 



Ward's Kmintain I'eii.s. Kine I'aptrs 
and Envelopes, .Studmls' Supplies. 
Send for samples of Knjjraved Invita- 
tions, Class and Fraternity Paper, 
Hanquet Menus, Visitinj^ Cards, etc. 




Trains men for attractive positions in vocations 
that are not overcrowded. 

Tuition is free to residents of Massachusetts. 

Necessary expenses are moderate. 

A CATALOG WILL BE SENT ON REQUEST 



SAMUEL WARD CO. 



WARD'S 



5763 Franklin Street 
BOSTON 



A// S/j'/ts 0/ 



SWEATERS 
AND JERSEYS 



KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST, MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 









^T. 



TRAOf 9^ ^^H ka) MARK 



•6 



^-s Ton. MAS 



Co nip /lit Line of 



$' 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

N neteen Hundred Twelve Index, 
, Nineteen Hundred Tnirteen Index. 

Y. M. C. A., 
I Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridg« Club, 

Rifle Club. 

Dramatic Society. 

Debating Society. 

Pubiic Speaking Couf>cil, 



Athletic Goods 
and BANNERS 



H. C. Walker, President 

Geo. H. Chap.nan, Secretary 

C. C. Pearson, Manager 

R. J. Borden. Manager 

R. r. Beers. Manager 

H H. Wood, Manager 

S. M. Jordan. Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

O. G. Anderson. Manager 

F. S. Madison, Pre^taeat 

L. S. Cahwell. President 

J D. French, Manager 

W. J. Weaver. President 

A. F. McDougall, President 

W. J. Birdsail. President 

J. M. Heald. President 

T. J. Moreau, Presid*?nt 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

I.KNK (UtlNUING 

Full lint 0/ ColUg* Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



PKOMINENCE 

Is given here to the fact that we take 

special care in the posing of 

subjects in order to bring 

out all the good 

features. 

Light and shade is skilfully diflusei 

This and the excellent finish makes 

our PH()T(K;K.APHS masterpiecs 

of reproductive art. 

SHILLARE'S STUDIO. 

142 Main St., Northam ptoii 

F. C. PLUMB 

Barber 5hop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



17 .South College 



It is lull asboil tiniebef'>ir 1 iiri»t- 
mas. What could be better than a 
gift of a pair of .Moccasins, Moc 
casin Cruisers or Indoor .Mf>ccasins? 



WOOLLEY '14 

Winter Boots and Moccasins 
Indoor Moccasins 

COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

line Repairing a Specialty 

Custom Work 

Holland's Block. Phoenix Row 



\\/hen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, .Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables. 

ToweLs, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



AMHERST. MASS. 



m. mm parlor 

CLEANSING. 

PRESSING. 

REPAIRING. 

Qiilfkenl !»«>rvtrr. Krai Work. I.nwrat Prl.. 

All woik carefully done Work called (or an>l 
aeli»ered. Grnts' overcoat*, suitt, panU and 
coat*. Ljidie*' hne linen suiU a ipecialty 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



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Tel .No. 34J , 



JACKSON &- CUTLER 



lelephoiie Courier tion 

TAILOR AND PRESSER 

Fall and Winter .Suits 

Chevrons and Stripes 

Put on Military Suits 

Pull Dress Suits to Rent 

(ients' Furnishings 

Jacob Reed's .Sons are the leading manufat t.ii- 1 s ,,{ 

UN I FORMS 

H'.r , uHege and military sc lioois. .uid have won and 
mamlain th.-ir prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of -'(iold Medal Uniforms. " 



CARS 



Leave AQOie COLLEQE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUK. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AOOIE COL- 
LE(iE at 7 and 37 mim. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Cere et ReeM>iMible Retee 

AMHERSI & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 



1424-1426 Chestnut St., 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



THE NEW ENGLAND NEWSPAPER 

All the news and the Truth 
about it, in the :: :: 

Springfield Repabllcao 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 
News fully reported. 

BEST SPORTING PAGES 

The Weekly Republican will be sent 

free for one month to anyone 

wishinj^ to try it. 

I>a$/y, %8. Sunday, $j. H^eekly, $/. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Vol.. XXII. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, January 16, 1912. 



t 



No. 14 



PROGRESS SHOWN 



INTERCLASS DEBATE 



FRESHMEN WIN 



HOCKEY r \M TIES 



By Drematics C«5t in Ware Perform- 
ance Thursday Night. j 

V/ith every performance the cast ^ 

•Wnai Happened to Jones" Is Im- ; 
. :ving steadily and presenting a 
smoother and more finished produc- 
t • . There is every indication that : 
*(itn a month's more preparation the 
Dramatic Society will be abh to give 
a performance at Northampton which 
will not only excel alt its previous 
efforts, but set a standard which It will 
bt difficult to equal in the future. 
Assistant Manager Harold F. Jones 
wili have charge of the tickets for the 
Prom performance and all desiring to 
gel blocks of seats will see him. 

Thursday night the play was given 
in Ware before a large audience and 
showed plainly the results of Mr. and 
Mrs. James K. Mills' painstaking and 
careiul coaching. 

The next performance will be at 
Greenfield. Wednesday, Feb. 7th. 

ANNUAL INTERCLASS MEET. 

The ImercUss meet will be held 
Saturday Jan. 27ih. 1912. All en- 
tries must be in by Saturday, Jan. 20. 

LIST OE EVENTS. 

One mile run 
1000 yard run 
600 yard run 
400 yard run 

Two mile run (if there are six entries) 
Relay race 

Pursuit race (Sophomore vs. Fresh- 
men) 
25 yard dash 
Shot put 
High jump 
Broad jump 
Pole vault 
Rope climb 

R. T. Beers, Manager. 



Won by Seniors from Freshman Team. Fast Basketball in Gymnasium. Score 1 Williams 



in 



Wednesday evening the finals of 
the interclass debates, held under the 
auspices of the English department, 
were held in room G, South College, 
before a good audience and 1912 won 
a very close contest. The Senior 
class was represented by Hemenway, 
Terry and Hubert, who upheld the 
affirmative of the question, "Resolved 
that the Panama Canal should be 
Fortified." White. Miss Bisbee and 
Draper supported the negative of the 
question for 1915. Both sides spoke 
in the order named, and the rebuttals 
were given in the same order. 

Trie debate was closely contested as 
shown by the fact the vote of the 
judges stood two to one. The judges 
were Assistant Dean Lewis, Professor 
Neal, and Dr. Cance. Three attract- 
ive silver loving cups were presented 
the members of the w nning team. 



17-10. 

After the whist party Saturday 
evening, the Freshman basketball 
team defeated the Massasoit Club of 
Northampton, the score being 17 10. 

The team work of the Freshmen 
was especially noticeable, the passing 
being up to the standard. Phillips 
and Fairbanks showed up well, and the 
blocking of Melican at guard was good 



Exciting 
Game. 



Extra Period 



Saturday the hocktyteam battled to 
a tie with Williams after three extra 
oencds of play. 1 he game was finally 
called because of darkness. The 
team was pretty well worn out 
because of the tedious trip up 
and did not have the snap and 
go usually shown by them on the ice. 
After 2 minutes of play Field, centre 



For Northampton, the shooting of for Williams succeeded in shooting 
fouls was the special feature. Six the first goal of the game. The play 



METTAWAMPt TREK | 

On Saturday afternoon Mr. Kenney 
lead nearly seventy Metiawampe dev- 
otees on an eight-mile tramp to Mt. 
Norwottuck. the highest peak on the 
Hoiyoke Rang-. Everyone went, of 
course, fur the enjoyment of the trip 
itself; ulterior motives never entered 
into consideration. The day was quite 
clear, and Mt. Monadnock, Wachu- 
sett and Greylock were plainly visible. 
Most of the trekkers were content to 
ride home In the special waiting at the 
Notch— especially those who tried to 
take a short cut on the way down. 



THE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

tFrom the Boston Posl.] 
If all the people knew of the excel- 
lent work performed by the extension 
service of the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College. It would b« an easy 
matter to Induce the Legislature to 
appropriate adequate funds for the pur- 
pose each year. 

This service Is Inclusive and far- 
reaching. It alms to carry the Agri- 
cultural College, or a portion of it, to 
every farmer In the stale who wishes 
Its assistance. Besides a great num- 
ber of lectures and demonstrations, 
educational trains over the Boston & 
Albany railroad and the Sprlngfiela 
trolley system reached fully 9000 Inter- 
ested farmers. Over 3000 people 
have attended lectures and demonstra- 
tions which have been given at agri- 
cultural fairs. There are 25.000 
beys and girls who nave enrolled as 
members of corn and potato clubs. 
Over 1000 people have attended the 
j conference for community betterment 
' held at the college. 
j The trustees of the college will ask 
jthe Legislature of 1912 for $50,000 
with which to carry on the work. It 
! this seems large, It must be remem- 
! bered that the demand comes from 
' the people themselves, for two-thirds 
I of the calls made upon the extension 
! service now have to be refused. 



Profeisor Lewis gave an entertain- 
ing talk to the Liberal Club of North- 
ampton on Tuesday evening. His 
talk was on "The Experiences of a 
Has Been. " 



In the finals for the Interclass 

Debating Cup the seniors defeated 

the freshmen and thus secured the 

cup. The seniors took the affirma- 
; tive of the question-"Resolved. that , ^^^jnistration 

the United Slates should forUfy the 
I Panama Canal." 



points oul of seven tries were made In 
this way. 

COMMUNICATION 

(Communlc«»lon« 10 ih« Siomal concarnlne mti- 
•rs of t*"*'^*' IntarMt »r« wtlcoened. Th« Siohal 
Is nol to b« h«ld r»ipon«lbl» (or lh« opinion* lhu« 
•iprMMd ) 

Editor College Signal: 

Dear Sir ; 

It has been apparent for some time 
that there is need for a change In our 
method of student government. This 
need has been particularly patent to 
those In whom authority has been 
vested and who have had the executive 
duties to perforin. The causes which j 
have led up to present conditions tnay 
be briefly stated as follows ; the rapid 
Increase In the number of students, 
the Increasing diversity of student 
Interests and organizations, the incom- 
patibility of present means of adminis- 
tration with existing circumstances, 
and finally the passive interest In col 
lege affairs of a large proportion of the 
men. 

The conditions brought about by the 
above causes are these : 

1. That of a student body of 
approximately live hundred men only a 
small number are concerned In the 
executive functions of student govern- 
ment, or in other words the burden of 
work IS borne by the few. 

2. That about half of our students, 
and perhaps with just excuse, take no 
active interest in the conduct of affairs 
tnat should be of vital importance to 

all. 

3. That the rest of the students 
who do take a more or less active 
interest are hampered by petty cliques, 
etc., which an efficient means of gov- 
ernment would prevent. 

4. That our present elective sys- 
tem permits and encourages unfairness. 

5. That the Senate h-s no finan- 
cial standi' g ana in cons-qiience has 
no means at hand to Initiate or assist 
student enterprises or to attend to 



seemed to ^e mostly In the center and 
In our territory for this period and after 
9 minutes and 40 seconds of play Cut- 
ler, right wing for Williams succeeded 
n shooting the second goal of the 
game. For the next 5 minutes of 
play the puck was carried back and 
forth up and down the ice until time 
was called ending first half. Score 
Williams 2, Massachusetts 0. 

After an inlerinlsslun of 7 minutes 
the second half was started and Wil- 
liams was very much surptlsed to find 
that our team had come back strong'jr 
than when the game was started and 
from then on the puck was practically 
in Williams territory all the time with 
the exception of long shots of Mac- 
Namee, Williams point, which sent 
the puck back Ir.to center again. All 
through the period Wiillams practically 
assumed a defensive position and at- 
tempted a very few rusncs to get the 
puck near our goal. Our team showed 
up well in team work this period and 
after 5 minutes of playPecicham shot our 
first goal. Again after four and one-had 
minutes of play Peckham succeeded 
in shooting another goal on a pass from 
Jones. This made the score 2 to 2. 

At this point the WilHams student 
body tried to cheer their team along but 
our men were there every time. The 
play then shifted from Williams territory 
to the center for the rest of the period, 
neither team being able to score. It 
was then decided to play for a 5 min- 
ute period. Play was again resumed 
but Williams* defense proved too 
strong for our men to get by but sever- 
al unsuccessful attempts for goal were 
made by Peckham, Sanctuary, and 
Jones, while Field, Cutler and Mich- 
aels excelled for Williams in rushing the 
puck down on our territory. A second 
5 minute period was then played but 
neither team scored and after ma' ow- 
ing to the fact that tne last train east 
from Williamstown left at 5-40 pLy was 
lesumed for a one minute period, no 



many incidental matters, a fact which , ^^^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^^^ p^^,^^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ 
only those who are connected with the j ^^^^^^ Williams showed up well the 

first half but after that her men seem- 
[aopreclate. 



[ConilnuMl ea Vf 2] 



ed pretty tired and played a defensive 




I 



n^ 



The College Sifnal. Tuesday, January i6, 1912. 



The College Signal. Tuesday, January 16,1912 



game for the remainer of game. Field, 
and Cutler played very well as forwards 
while MacNamee showed up well at 
point. For Massachusetts Peckham, 
Sanctuary and Jones did good 
work. 

The game from start to finish was 
not very exciting or very fast but 
showed undue roughness on the part 
of Williams. Another game is b^ing 
sought by Manager Wood but possi- 
bilities are small because of the fact 
that Williams is allowed to play only 
a certain number of games during the 
season. 

The line-up was as follows : 

WILLIAMS. MASSACHUSSETTS. 

Bartlett. goiU, Ackerman 

MacNamee, point. Little 

Michaels, (capt.) cover point. Walker 
C.T.Curtis. DeBronkart. right wing, 

A. Johnson 
Pie'd, center. Sanctuary 

King. Gillette, rover, Jones 

Cutler. Lwing, right wing. Peckhanrj. (capt,) 



COMMUNICATION 

(Continued from page I ] 



FIRST HALF. 




CmIc 


Tim*. 


1. Williams, Field, 


2 min. 


2. Williams. Cutler, 


9 min. 40 sec. 



SECOND HALF. 

1. Massachusetts. Peckham, 5 min. 

2. Massachusetts. Peckham. 9 min. 30 sec. 
Score— Williams 2. Massachusetts 2. 

Referee-^ Peacock of Pittsfield. Goal 
umpires- Curtis of Williams, Wood of 
M. A. C. Timers, Gilchrist of Williams. 
Williams of M. A. C. Timer— two fifteen 
minute, two five minute and one one uiin- 
ute period*. 

Saturday the hockey team had a 
day of trials and troubles.owing to trans- 
portation facilities. To start with the 
train leaving Northampton for Green- 
field at 9-44 A. M. was missed be- 
cause of the fact that no cars from Am- 
herst to Northampton ran between 
8-30 and 10 A. M.. the power being 
off for some trouble at the power-house. 
Arriving at Northampton at 10-45 the 
expectation was to leave (or Green- 
field at 11-05. but train was 25 min- 
utes late. Just as train got well under 
way for Greenfseld the rear wheels of 
the rear truck of the first car. 
jumped from the rails and the 
train was stopped after having proceed- 
ed 200 yards with the wheels cutting 
off the heads of the rail spikes for over 
150 yards. A half hour was then lost 
while the wheel were being replaced 
on the rails. After that everything 
passed serenely until Greenfield was 
reached at 12-30 when It was found 
that irain for Troy scheduled at 12-47 
was one hour and fifteen minutes late. 
The team then went to the Hotel 
Devens for luncheon. At 2 o'clock 
the fellows were on their way again for 
Wllliamstown and arrived there at 3-30 
P. M. As Williams Gollege is about 
a mile and a quarter from the station 
15 minutes more passed before the 
team got there. 



6. That there is no source of gen- 
eral and specific information available 
to the student to acquaint him with 
the details of student government. 

It would seem necessary that some 
revision of our methods take place or 
that the present system be overturned 
completely and an reorganization 
effected upon a sounder basis. Such 
a reorganization, which seems to be 
the easiest and most advisable course 
should be undertaken with the follow- 
ing objects in view : 

To unify and bring into systematic 
relationship the various student organ 
Izations. To make every student have 
an active interest in the conduct of 
college affairs. To do away with 
cliques and partisan interests which 
have a tendency to demoralize college 
spirit. 

The facts as above stated seem to 
me a fair and impartial presentation of 
our present situation and its needs. 
Such conditions should not be allowed 
to continue but we should immediately 
take whatever action may be necessary 
to Insure the healthy development of 
our activities and a better and truer 
college spirit. 

Ralph R. Parker. 



UP-TO-DATE 

* COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 



4^ 



Elite Shoes, 
Swell Shod Shoes, 
Pumps the fit, - 



$3.50 to $5.00 
- $5.00 and $6.00 



.00 



EXPERT REPAIRING 



PAGE'S Shoe Store, 



BETVVKEN THK BANK.S 



J 



ALUMNI STATISTICS 

The following alumni statistics have 
been compiled expressly for the Signal 
from the 191 1 revised list: 

OCCUPATIONS OF ALUMNI. 

Alumni, 904 

Deceased, 64 

Unknown occupation, 73 

Retired, 5 

Farmers. 124 

Teachers, 89 

In Experiment Stations. 46 

Engineers, 43 

Chemists, 27 

Physicians, 21 

Landscape Gardeners, 16 

Manufacturers, 14 

Merchants, 7 

Veterinary Surgeons, 6 

Druggists, 6 

Foresters, 6 

Lawyers, 5 

Dentists. 4 

Architects, 4 

Clergymen, 3 

The list includes besides those tab- 
ulated above, entomologists, park 
commissioners, journalists, salesmen, 
army officers, musiclans.draughtsmen, 
postal clerks, photographers, nursery- 
men, etc. 



HARRISON'S NURSERIES... 

Berlin, Maryland. 
Have over two thousand acres in Nursery Stock. 
They offer a book on 

HOW TO GROW AND MARKET FRDIT 

For 50 cents. 

AW prospective buyers are invited to visit the 

Nursery. 

They are the largest growers of fruit trees in 

this country. 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, lid PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



At the regular meeting of the Land- 
scape Art Club. Tuesday evening. 
Prof. F. A. Waugh gave an illustrated 
kcture on "Modern Landscape Gar- 
dening." 



GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF ALUMNI. 

Alumni, 904 

Living, 836 

Deceased, 68 

Living abroad, 45 

Living in United States, 754 

Address Unknown, 37 

Those living in the United States 

are distrlbu\ed among the states as 

follows: 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Kodaks, 

Eastman Films, 

Victor Talking 
Machines, 

Victor Becords, 

Fountain 
Pens, 

Leather Goods. 




MI 

rnOTOGRAPHER 

The best workmanship, 

The latest styles. 

Reasonable prices 

Lincoln Building, Amherst, Mass. 



The Prospect House 



PERRY'8- 



The place to eat after the game. 
.\ttractive tables and rooms. Excel- 
lent service. Catering a specialty. 



DEUEL'S 

DRUG STORE 



MRS. E. e:. perry 

There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

GOAL 



or 



C. R. ELDER 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



j»E. N. PARISEAU,^ 

Barber j^ SKop 

RAZORS HONED 



418 

65 

48 

26 

25 

25 

20 

15 

14 

14 

12 

10 

9 



No. 2 Pleasant, 5t., Amherst, Mam. 
THE 

Hoover & Smith Co. 

616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 

Diamond Merchants 

PhilideipMis ONIclil Fntiriiti Jewelir 

■PBOIALISTBIN 

Fraternity Badges, Fobs. Novelties, 

Rings. Charms Prises. Trophies. 

Medals Cellefe Pins, Fobs. Seals, 

Rinfs, Charms.-. 



Massachusetts, 

New York. 

Connecticut, 

California, 

Pennsylvania, 

New Jersey, 

Illinois, 

Rhode Island, 

New Hampshire, 

Washington, D. C. 

Vermont, 

Washington, 

Indiana and Montana, 

Georgia and Maine, 

Ohio, 

Michigan and Wisconsin, 

Maryland and Colorado, 

Minnesota, Florida, Missouri and 

South Dalcoia, 4 

Nebraska, Virginia, Alabama and 

West Virginia, 3 

North Carolina, South Carolina, 
Wyoming, Kentucky. Iowa, Arizona, 
Idaho and Mississippi have two each 
while there is one man in each of 
Tennessee. New Mexico, Arkansas, 
Oklahoma, Louisiana and Texas. 
Of those abroad Brazil has 7, Cuba 6, 
ihe Hawalan Island 6, Japan 5, Porto 
Rico 4. the Philippines 3, England, 
Africa, Turkey and China 2, and Ger- 
many. Canada, West Indies. Panama, 
Mexico and Malay one each. 



The Stockbrldge Club was addressed 
Tuesday by Hubert '12. on "General 
Agricultural Conditions In the South." 





THF. STORE 

FOR 






CLSVHES! 



Clothing Heavily Reduced 

TI»«Te are plenty of ( lothf.s Sales thi-se .lays. I.ul tlK-re".-, .is much dirtcrence 
l)etwcen them and tlieir methods, and what ihey really mean -and what you get tor 
your money-as there is between the Clothes themselves. U e are now holding our 

Semi-Aiinual Clearance Sale 

which means that 200 Mens H.nl.t.rade .Suits ami .20 .Men's Overmals will he 

sold at 1-5 off from regular price 
>o Suits and Overcoats at >i6 00 •« Suits and Overto.ii^ at >m.40 

All Suits and ()verc(»at> at tlu- same discount 
It's the buying opportunity of the year. Don't miss it 

SANDERSON & THOMPSON 




The WoftTiiv. 



FRANK H. nANFORTM. Mc«. 

SPRINGFIELD. MASS. 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 



S] 



Mihert 
•f 



CAP A GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the At- 
. w . *, 1- u.tkMk«lt.ii I»"t'C <o the Pacific. Class ContracU a 

Amhersl Corner In Raln»kellar. specialty 



M.B.MAGRATH&SON 

Toefil Mientka, 

Passenger and 3^,^, g^j jnoe Repairing, 
Baggage Transfer. «■>". «hii. , » .., 

Ail il»«^* •*••♦« 

Order* left at the Amh*rit Hou»« will receive 
prompt attention. 



AlriMM. 



MofXQy JroTTK Aome / 



An event of student day* because 
it me«n« the httle luxuries and the 
big ones too, like Fatima Cigarettes. 

ft'llh each packate of Falima you O l\ C _ 

Itl a ptnruini coupon, 25 of uihith ^ \J I O ■ 

•'cure a KanJtomt feU college pen- « e . 

MiW {I2*i2i mktiiim •/ foo 19 CCnU 



-PUT YOUR FEET ON EASY STREET'' 

Gilbert's Adjustable Arch Cushions 

Should be worn by everyone sufferitig frcm " I l.a Kooi " as well as those 
whose arches are just heginninR to break (lr,wn. Made without heavy metal 
parts to hurt or rubber to sweat the feet, and in such a manner that the 
elevation can be changed. Very light in weight and always comfortable. 

No More Cold Feel. Wear 

the: PROTEIX HAIR IIMSOLEIS 

Best protection against cold and dampness. 

THE RAJAH FIBRE! INSOLEIS" 

Are warm in winter and cool in the summer, consequently give |)erfect foot 

comfort. They outwear the shoes. 

Henry Adams & Co. 

Time I«liX:AI-rI-. «tc>r*? 



^ 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January i6, 1912. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 16, 191a. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF BDIT0B8. 

ALDEN C. BRETT. 1912 EdItor-ln-Chlef. 

R. H. VANZWALENBURC. 13. Aaslsttnt Editor. 
JESSE CARPENTER. JR .1912 MaiUfinc Editor. 
MARSHALL C.PRATT. 1912. Competition Editor 
ROYAL N. HALLOWELL. J 91 2. Athletics. 

JOSEPH A. HARLOW. 1912. Athletics. 

OSCAR C. ANDERSON. 1913. Ahimn* Note* 
SILAS WILLIAMS. 191?, Department Note*. 

S. MILLER JORDAN 1913. College Note*. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

ALBERT W.DOOCE. 1912. Bualne** Manager. 

GEORGE ZABRISKIE 1913 AM. Bua. Manager 
ERNEST S. CI ARK. JR. 1914. Circulation. 

CHESTER E. WHEELER. 1914. Circulation 

STUART B. FOSTER. 1914. C'rwitotton. 



SulMcHption $1 50 per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Albert W. Dodgb. 



Entered •• •eoond-claa* matter at the Amberal 
Poai omee. 



Vol. XXII. TUESDAY, JAN. 16. No. 14 



The past week has brought to atten- 
tion a practice which it seems has 
been followed during the past semes- 
ter by several members of the faculty. 
A member of the hockey team 
recently took a quizz which he had 
every reason to think he passed. The 
marking of his paper ahead of those of 
the rest of the class, and the making 
of a special report would have made 
the hockey player eligible for the fol- 
lowing Saturday's game — an import- 
ant one. At about the same time a 
special report was made in the case 
of another hockey mar which rendered 
him ineligible. Let there be some 
consistency in this matter of special 
reports to the Dean ; either make 
none or make them for every member 
of the team. The college has a right 
to the support of the faculty and espe- 
cially of Its alumni members. 



census of alumni opinion taken in 1910 
a large majority of the replies indicated 
that the writer believed that dormitor- 
ies have a beneficial effect upon the 
student himself; 90^ of the replies 
affirmed that dormitories promote true 
college spirit and 80^ regarded a dor- 
mitory as productive of good discipline 
while all agreed that the present dor- 
mitory accommodations of the college 
are inadequate. 

The relation of the townspeople to 
the students we think should not be 
considered in deciding what steps 
should be taken. At the present rate 
of growth and with the necessary 
increase in the faculty there will 
always be a demand for rooms what- 
ever policy the college may adopt. 
The first consideration of the trustees 
should be the welfare of the students 
President Butterfield in his cemmuni- 
cation to the Amherst Record says, 
"Clearly our dormitory policy must be 
determined by the best interests of the 
students as a primary consideration." 

The sentiment of students and 
alumni is unanimous "we must have 
more dormitories," and we believe 
that this first undertaking of the 
trustee: should be experimental only in 
so far as it will show what size and 
type of dormitory is best suited to the 
needs of the college. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



EWELL'5 



PARKS. 

FLORIST, 

Flowers for all occcasions. 

Mail or telephone orders given 
prompt attention. 

239 Main St., Northampton 




We set included this year in the 
legislative budget an item calling for 
an appropriation of $25,000 for the 
building of a dormitory. This again 
opens up the question which was under 
discussion some time ago — "What 
shall be the policy of the trustees in 
regard to the housing of the student 
body?" 

The conditions which exist at the 
present time are far from ideal. The 
dormitories are able to accommodate 
only 66 men or one eighth of the stu- 
dent body. The other 450 men must 
find rooms off the campus. This con- 
dition while bad enough in the earlier 
years of the college has become worse 
with the increased demand for rooms. 
Rentals have been raised until it is 
impossible to hire a room within walk- 
ing distance of the college for a reason- 
able amount. Many of the men who 
come here are dependent in part upon 
their own efforts and it Is impossible 
for such men to pay these high rates. 

That the dormitory system i.«; super- 
ior to present conditions, both from the 
viewpoint of the individual and the col- 
lege is a well recognized fact. In the 



COLLEGE NOTES 

Sigma Tau D-^lta. Theta Chi and 
C. S. C. will hold their initiation ban- 
quets this week. 

H. D. Brown '1 4, was chosen assist- 
ant manager of the musical clubs at a 
meeting Tuesday night. 

There are still a few copies of the 
1913 /w/pjr left—get busy, freshmen, 
and buy one before it's too late. 

The Williams game was something 
of a disappointment to the many 
strong believers In our hockey team. 

Professor Gordon was the Y. M. C. 
A. speaker in chapel Thursday night. 
His talk was upon the relation of 
science to religion. 

Rev. J. S. Lyon of Holyoke 
addressed the Chapel service Sunday 
morning on "Our Conception, Search 
for, and Gaining of Values." 

Invitations for the Junior Prom may 
be secured from G. E. Howe '13, the 
latter part of this week. There is 
every Indication that the Prom will be 
a well attended and successful affair. 

"What Happened to Jones" was 
given by the Dramatic Society at 
Ware on Thursday evening and was a 
successful production in every way. 
The next date is Feb. 7th at 
Greenfield. 

Mr. Hinkley of Armour & Co., 
Springfield, gave a meat-cutting dem- 
onstrrtion In the Animal Husbandry 
Building, Saturday afternoon. A side 
of beef was used, the different cuts 
being illustrated and explained, and 
also the best methods of preparing 
them for the table. 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUG5 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



It's a good thing not to worry about 
your p>edal ap|)arel, its correct, style 
comfort or durability. 

Buy your .shoes from 

THe Shop Tlial Has Tlie Slile 

" Walk Over, " Haywood Shoes, 

13-50, $4-00, $5.00 



Bolles " Special, " Stetson Shoes, 

$5.00 to $8.00 

REPAIRINC DEPARIMENT 

E.M. BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMA.N." 
.N'ext to Corner Drug Store. 



Angier. '13. 



Clark, '13. 



We have a full line of Hanners, Host 
Cards, College .Songs, .Seal I'apers, Foun- 
tain Pens, Candy, 'Ionic and Student 
Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

BASEMENT OF NO. COLLEGE 



Eld ridge, '14. 



Tarbell, '14. 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. 

Amherst, 



Phillips Hlock 
Mass. 



Carptn-ter & AVorehousf, 

PRINTERS, 



No I, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



H. E. 



KINSMAN 

Colkge Pbotogra'pDer 



NASH BLOCK, MAIN ST., 
AMHERST, 






MASS. 



High-grade artistic work. Perfect satisfaction guaranteed. 

Studio newly equipped with large sky h'ght 

and special lense for large 

groups. 

All styles the latest. Pine picture framing. 



Interclass basketball. Drill hall 



1912 vs. 1914 and 1913 vs. 
1915. 
21 — Chapel 9-15 a. m.. Henry 
Bond of Brattleboro, Vt. 



JOURNALISM CLASS 

If you read it in the Springfield 



Saturday's Vettawampe trek was 
one of the best attended of the year. I 
Seventy devotees of the "short-cut to 1 
happiness" system started out but I Jan, 
after about thirteen miles of stiff trav- 1 
eiling had almost changed their minds 1 
with regard to the comparative merits 
01 gym and cross country hiking. 

The Connecticut Va ley Breeders U»'on on Sunday, and it Is industrial 
Association held a meeting here last news, it will be the work of the class 
Wednesday. The principal speaker of in journalism. 

the session was Mr. Rabild. an expert The (/n/ow has made arrangements 
,n charge of the cow testing work carried to fun a department of industrial news 
on by the Department of AgricuHure in 'n Its Sunday issue. Prof. Robert 
Washington. There were also several ^- Neal has received word to this 
other addresses by different experts, effect, with an understanding that the 

Prof W. D. Hurd addressed the ' '^=»»"'^' <°^ ^^'^ "«^ ^«P^''t^^«"< ^^^a" 
Assembly on Wednesday speaking of ^e suppled by the journalism class, 
the work being done by the Extension i The new department will begin In 

Department. He prefaced his re- 1 ^«^^''"*'y• 
marks with a brief history of the found- ^he material used will be of various 
mgofthe college, spoke of its mission I kinds, but it *rill all have to do in 

,0 the people of the state, and lastly I ^o"^* ^^y *'»^ '"^^> '"^""'^- ^"<^ *"' 
told how the college is endeavoring I •'^^K^'y <^°"^'^< °f agricultural news: 
directly to fulfill this mission through and news about Industrial matters con. 
the extension department. "^'^'^'^ ^'^^^ ^"^^' "f«' 

The whist party held Saturday even- 
ing in the Drill Hall under the direc- 
tion of the Social Union was well 
attended, and an enjoyable time was 
spent by all. The first prize, an at- 




THE FIRST EIGHT PRIZE CROPS OF CORK ON ST0CKBRID6E: 

ifio.i busliels liarvested; 111.6.S Imsli*-!* cnb dry. > i.lliiisvill., 1 onn 

iji.g " " lo.!?? Moiimoulh. Mr 

" 85 a " " " (iiaiiby. Mass 

g4 9 Macihuty. N II 

" 83.»8 S. DwihfM, Mas-. 

•' go.2<) ' S. |)perh<>lil. M.i*r. 

77.Q5 N Kastoii, M.Ti*. 

76.51 Itrorkton, Mass. 



110. 

101. ^ " 

987 " 

90.9 
1104 

89.7 '• 



"This sfiiyifi that the soils of Mnssiiihusftt^ iirt not vet ty,t,/Y to h,- 
abamlonfit'' DR. If. W WILEY 

A 12-page illustrated pamphlet givii g full 
particulars will be sent to any address 



RAWI^I^P Fertilizer Company 

\3\j II llDll 43 Chatham St. Boston 



DEPARTMENT NOTES. 

GEOLOGY. 

The department of Zoology and 
Geology has recently installed a rock- 
tractive 'set comprising cuff links, scarf | 8'l"ding machine which will be used 
pin. and necktie clasp, was won by ' 'o' preparing polished surfaces and 
Hayden with a score of 80. Macy ; t^*'^ sections, for purposes of study 
'15, with a score o* seven, cap- 1 
tured the consolation prize, an orna- 1 
mental ash tray. 



F. A. SHERARD. 

EN'S STORE 



and exhibition. 

Dr. Gordon attended meetings of 
the American Association for the 



Early in February Superintendent Advancement of Science. In Washing- 
Parker of the Hartford Park System is '°". <^"''"g ^^^ Christmas recess, 
expected to lecture before the Land- agriculture. 

scape Art Club. Another speaker in Professor Graham lectured at the 
the near future will be Professor Pray ' Boston Poultry Show last week, 
of the Landscape Department of Har- 
vard University. Both these men are 
experts in their line and they will 



Kuppenheimefs 
Fine Clothes 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



undoubtedly present some phase of 
their work which will be of interest to 
the students of Landscape Gardening. 
Last Thursday evening In the Drill 
Hall, the "Intermediates" of the 
Junior class went down to defeat before 
the "Windjammers" of the Senior 
class, the final score being 16 6. It 
is reported that both teams are looking 
for games, the only condition being 
that their opponents average 
pounds. Until challenged, the "Wind- 1 
jammers" will hold the light weight i 
basketball championship of the college. 



EXTENSION. 

The Winter Short Course students 
elected the following officers last 
week: President. E. J. McJuill, 
Beverly: vice-president, C. Jones, 
Tufts College, Yale Forestry School; 
secretary, J. 5. BIgelow, Cohassett; 
treasurer. W. R. Blodgett, South 
Lincoln, a Harvard graduate. An 
entertainment committee was also 
chosen. It Is planned to have a pop- 
ular lecture one night in each week, 
for the benefit of the Snort Course 
^^ I students. 

Last week Professor Hurd lectured 
on "Corn Growing in the East." 
before the Warelands Dairy Schools 
In Boston. This week he will lecture 



Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOM TAILORING A SPECIALTY 

Thoma.s Hkmenway, 'i2, M. .\. i: Representative 




CAMPUS CALENDAR 

(Ncicferthu =oi«m« .houiib, dropped in ,h. ' there on "Polato Growing." 

SioHAL Offtc« or handed toR. H. V«nZwa!enburr 
' 1 3 on or before the Saturday precedlnr each Issue.} 

Jan. 16 — 6-45 p. m., Stockbrldge 

club room G, South College. 
Jan. 17 — 1-30 p. m.. Assembly, Dr. 

J. K. McCurdy of Springfield 

Training school. 



VOU WILL FIND 
A FULL LINE 
OF 



DUDLEY 

HUrrtTTER IN 

Fine Athletic Goods 

FOR EVERY SPORT 



Profeasor E. D. Waid lectured last 
week in Chesterfield on "Rural 
Betterment." 




ALUMNI NOTES 

'99. W. E. Hinds of the Alabama 

Hockey" s' 't. S. on campus. . ^8^'^"'*""' E^P^^'-^^"' ,^'^t'°; ^as 

Basketball Drill hall 8-00 p. m. """""^'y P"''"^*^^'^ * *»"""^'" ^**""« 

c . ,, L, I u. »■ ... I with the boll weevil. 

Senior " Heavyweights vs. I 

the "Unknowns." ninety-five. 

Jan. 18—6-45 p. m.. Y. M. C. A. At the banquet closing the two 

meeting In chapel. weeks conference of scientific men 

Jan. 20— Hockey, Amherst at Pratt of the office of farm management, at 

rink. 3-00 p. m. Washington, D. C, George A. Bll- 



lioais \ cmaiel! 



TOBACCO 



AT 



The College Drug Store 




•The 5tsT In Tmc World" 
Write for cataloge. 



Charles H. Dudley 

HANOVER, - N. H. 

Agent, HAZEN Mi 



The College Signal, Tuesday, Jauuary i6, 19 13. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 16, 1913. 



GOODS FOR MEN. 

C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 

.^^ English and Scotch Woolens. 

^^" ' THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 




AMHERST. 



DARTMOUTH. 



ttjhritit)(> 



Highest Grade Roses 

We are offering to our local patrons, selection from our large 
stock of finest Roses, especially grown for the Nkw York, and Hosion 
Flowkr Markeis. 

THE MONTGOMERY CO., Inc.. 

HADL-ELY, MASS- 

TELEPHOKES. 

AmherBt. tBb-R. 
Northampton. tyt»4K 



WE SOLICIT YOl'll PATRONAGE 

111 M) far a^ ')iir benefits are mutual. 

THE AMHERST GAS COMPANY 

Everything Electrical 

School and College Photographers . . . 




LOCALLY: 52 Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadley. Mass. 

Main Office: These Studios offer the l>est skilled 

■ $46-1^8 Broadway. artists and most complete 

New York City equipment obtainable 



A» r wn illrectly connected with a Wlioli-Kwle 
HnuM, i can 

SAVE TOl MONEY ON CLOTHES 

will lip |)lpn8«'il to show KHmpU'it uml !«t.yle«of 
Winter Siitt.. wnil OvereoAin. 

H. H. WHITK, inl.'t. tluntn RIork 
Up One rilglil 



STKAM FIT TING. Telephone J9— 4 

(JAS FITriNG. TINNING 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PLUMBERS. 



^specialty of Kepairinx 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Winoows, 

l.EAO LifiHTS, &c. 

« Clifton Ave.. AMHERbT. MASS 



If yon wnnt to Itr 

MOMI> WITH THI': lilKI.^« 

you miiM havf yourciothrB pros •■.! ,intl I'li-Hnetl 

ATBPSTESM'S 

II Amily St. Maroon Htnre 

Preaitlng "i*' Cleaning a apf claliv 

Mowl liheral Itrkct liyNliMii In town 



M. D. OILMAN. C. A. MorFKT. 

TELEPHONE 1079-3. 

GILMAN and M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wlioh-sale Dealers 

CONFECTIONERY. 

S07 to ill Main 8trkkt. 

Worcester, Mass. 



lings was elected first president of the 
newly created organization. He has 
recently issued a bulletin on "Cropping 
Systems in Central New Jersey." 

H. D. Hemenway of Northampton 
has recently been re elected council- 
man from Ward 2. Two of his books 
have been adopted by the school de- 
partment of New York City. 

'00. — A book entitled "An Elemen- 
tary Treatise on Stock Feeds and 
Feeding," by J. E. Halligan, chemist 
in charge of the Louisiana Experiment 
Station has recently been published. 

'04.— R. R. Raymoth is singing 
on the vaudeville stage in Pacific 
coast cities. 

'08.- Thomas H. Jones has sev- 
ered his connections with the U. S. 
Bureau of Entomology and is now 
entomologist for the Sugar Producers 
Experiment Station, Rio Pedras, 
Porto Rico. 

'08. — F. H. Johnston who has been 
working on t'uck crop insects on Long 
Island, N. Y. this summer has now 
betn transferred to Norfo.k, Va. 
Address Virginia Truck Experiment 
Station, Norfolk, Va. 

'09. — J. B. Thomson, Monterey, 
farmer In charge of place of Mrs. 
John Reid of Yoi kers, N. Y. 

class of 1911. 

James F. Adams, instructor in bot- 
any. University Club. State College, 
Pa. 

Park W. Allen, insurance and real 
estate, Westfeld. 

Herbert J. Baker. Amherst. 

Raymond C. Barrows. Stafford 
Springs, Conn. 

Arnold G. Bentley, BecKer Milling 
Moichine Co.. 193 Fairniount Avenue, 
Hyde Park. 

Herbert W. Blaney, with W. H. 
Manning, landscape designer, 237 
Humphrey Street. Swampscott. 

Eagar M. Brown, city park depart- 
ment, Pond House, Elizabeth Park, 
Hartford, Conn. 

Allyn P. Bursley, superintend park 
commission. St. Petersburg, Fla. 
Arthur T. Conant. salesman, Sunder- 
land. 

Charles M. Damond. teaching in 
Amherst high school, Amherst. 

E. Norton Davis, farmer, Three 
Rivers. 

Irving W. Davis, instructor in po- 
mology and entomology, Middlebury 
College. Middlebury. Vt. 

Irwin C. Gilgore, salesman, Central 
Square, N Y. 

N. Herbert Hill. Fnilerton, Cat. 

Albert R. Jenks, supervisor of cor- 
sespondence courses at M. A. C. Am- 
herst. 

Leonard M. Johnson, assistant prin- 
cipal of high school. Newtown. Conn. 

Gaston E. Labouteley, farm mana- 
ger, 44 Highland Avenue, Lynn. 

Edward A. Larrabee, assistant In 
botany. Massachusetts College Experi- 
ment Station, Amherst. 

Robert D. Lull, farm manager, 
Dalton. 



I 



and am interested in NEW ENGLANIJ 
AGRICULTURE and have devoted a 
Special Department of my business \i, 
the handling of FARMS and COU.N- 
TRY HOMES with F. P. MARSTON, 
N. H. '8i, as Manager. Correspondence 
solicited. Send for RAYMOND'S RED 
LETTER, Farm and Country Home 
Edition. Reliable agents wanted. 

T. H. RAYMOND 



Central Square, 



Cambridge, Mas 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

Williams Block, Amherst, Ma.ss. 

OpKirE MoiRS: 

FOR FARMS ! 

Big, Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building Lotb 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W R BROWN 

Savings iiank Bl'k, 

Amherst. - Mass. 

AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

Ili^h-Grtuie College Work 
LAUNDRY 



shirts. 
Collars, 
Cuffs. 
Plain wash. 
Same, rough dry. 



lO ift 
;c 
ac 

40C per <lor. 

250 per doz, 



Ralph R Parker, agent. C S. C. House. 

K5 Pleasant St. 

Francis S Madison, agent for 1915 and 

short course. Vet. Lab. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Fred S Merrill, agent, C. S. C. House 

85 Pleasant St. 
Put full name and address on laundry 



WriglitiOltsoni 



Headquarttrs 
for 



Athletic Supplies 



Foot Ball 
Hockey 
Track and 
Field Sports 



-A 



W. •. PAT Off 



t^XLi. College Students 
Set B,.ii and Athletes who 
want the real, su- 
perior articles for 
the various sports 
should insist upon 
those l)earlng the 
Wright & Ditson 
Trade Marii 



Catalogue Free 

Wright & Ditson 

334 Washington Street. Ho.ston 

New Yorli Chicago 

San Francisco 
Providence Cambridge 

R. H. PowER.s, Agent, South 









- — n 

r^ .1 
NIUEM 




I |IPIY3K<: 



Conn. Valley St. Ry. Lines 

FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
lural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations, violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

ay Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



Frank D. McGraw, Purchase Street, 
Fall River. 

Frederick A. McLaughlin, assistant 
in botany, M. A. C. Amherst. 

Henry B. Morse, head of science 
department. Proctor academy, An- 
dover, N. H. 

Isaburo Nagai, graduate student at 
Cornell, Bryant Avenue, Ithaca, N. Y. 
George P. Nickerson, South Belt- 
ing Co. 40-46 South Forsyth Street, 
Atlanta, Ga. 

Gustaf A. Nielsen, Harvard forestay 
school, Cambridge. 

Bernhard Osirolenk. teacher In 
high school Slayton, Wis. 

Samuel R, Parsons, assistant In 
mathematics and military science, M. 
A. C. Amherst. 

Roland H. Patch, Wenham. 
Herman A Pauly, tester, Norfolk 
dairy insurance association, The 
Wavelands, Norfolk. 

Percy W. Pickard, Bowker Fertili- 
zer Co. Boston, 

Ralph W. Piper, fruit grower. South 
Acton. 

Philip H.Prouty, farmer. Shrewsbury. 
Phllias A. Raclcot, Coe-Mortlmer 
Fertilizer Co. 51 Chambers Street. 
New York city. 

Ralph C. Robinson, landscape gard- 
ener. Nayack, R. I. 

Arthur H. Sharpe landscape grad- 
ener ft Brown Bros. Nurseries, Well- 
and County. Ontario, Canada. 

Clarence A. Smith, instructor In 
chemistry. State College, Pa. 

Raymond G. Smith, graduate as- 
sistant In botany. M. A. C. Amherst. 
Lomas O. Stevenson, farmer, Bar- 
nctt. Miss. 

V/lUard M. Titus, Coe-Mortlmer 
Co. Moosic. Pa. 

Edward E. Warren, traveling for 
German Kali Works, Leicester. 

Raymond L. Whitney, superintend- 
ent of estate of Edwin Grim, Winches- 
ter. 

Harold F. Willard, teacher, Mid- 
Pacific College, Honolulu. T. H. 

Ervln L. Winn, chemist, Carteret. 
N.J. 

The first call for experiences of the 
m.in of 1911 for the class letter lias 
been issued. Letter is expected to 
be out by April 1st. 1912. 

L. M. Johnson, Sec'y. 

ex '14. — William Nicoll was mar- 
ried to Miss Elsie Louise Douglass at 
Malone. N. Y., Dec. 27. Mr. and 
Mrs. Nicoll will live at Bridgehampton, 
N. Y. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Chteti only from t A. M. to 4 A. M. 



RESOLUTIONS 

Whtreas: It has pleased God In his infinite 
wisdom to take to Himself the mother of 
our friend and brother. Patricio Cardine 
Peneradonda ; therefore, be it 

Resolved. That we. the members of the 
Q. T. V. fraternity do extend to him our 
iincercst sympathy in this, his hour of griel; 
and be it further 

Resolved. That a copy of these resolutions 
be sent to the bereaved family, that a copy 
be filed in the records of the fraternity, and 
that a copy be published in the College 
Signal. 

Theodore J Moreau. ) p^^ ^^^ 
Harold M Core, , Fraternity. 

NwooN H. Debriho. ) ' 



THE. 5AAOOTHEST 
TOBACCO 

SEE the singer full of glee piping up! See 
the pipe full of Velvet helping outl 
Velvet, the finest of leaf — aged over two years — 
toned down — mellowed — fit for "Prcxic** 
himself. Time alone can eliminate all harsh- 
ness — bring about real smoothness and 
develop the taste that's good. When 
exams, loom up and uncertainty is 
ripe — a tin of Velvet will help 
concentration and study — it's 
smoolli! At all dealers. 

SPAULDING & MERRICK 

CHICAGO 



WAC 



••^ 



Full 2 ox. 
Tins 



One 

5c, 



ounce 



baga, 
mt for 



., conveniei 
cigarette smouera 



AC CO 



Orchards Pay Better Than Gold Mines When Fertilized With 

GENUINE THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER! 



The Ma»«achu«ett» .State Hoard of Agricultur* Offered a l'ri«e I.t the Mo»t t>rofitabi« Acf«of 
VI is< ichu«ett>. < Jfchard*. ThU Contest Has Recantly Closed, and the 



PRIZE IS WON BV THE OHEW-WUNSON FRUIT CO., «f LllUaton. 
rh«lr Prlie WinninK Acre of Baldwin Applas 
OAVE THBI*I A TOTAL RETURN OP S7IS.70-TME NET PROFrf WA* MI9 •» 



F^gAV/L^i^.y^/wr^i^uBEHOlllE THDinilS PHOSPHITE POWBEi;j.ili'jv prkVc^^ 



The K illjwin* I.ett-r KrD.n Barnes Brothers, tlve KamouH fruit Grower* and Orchardlrts of 

ValMTllle, ( onn.. Shows Th.it Thomas Phosphate Powder Bring* a Priie to 

Every User in the Form of a l'rofitat»la Crop : 



The Cob Mortimrr Comi-anv, 

Gentlenwn : _. . „ ^ 

I n regard to Thommi Phosphate PoivJtr. 

you will recall that we bought of you last year 
Ito tout and we wish to say that it gave us mett 
exetllenl results. On our pe^ch orchard wh»-te 
we us»Ki It. the trees made a sfilrndid frowth 
with heavy dark green fotioft. the frutt vas »/ 
excilUnt color, and the keeping qualsttes -uere re- 



markakle. which vat a big advantage, especial- 
ly when we had over IW cars to harvest in about 
/tro w**** as we had this year. 

We never saw better colored Baldwin Appies 
than thote we grew where we ntplud a good 
dressing of Thomas Phosphate Poxfder. The 
best tout at retail for |9 OO per barrel 
Yours truly. 

Barnes Bruthf.r*. 



THERE IS A TRUTH IN ALL THIS FOR VOU I 

The whole story is told in the New Kdition of our Booklet, ••Up-To-I>ate 
Fruit Growing," which is sent free if you n»entlon The CoLLEfiF Signal. 

The Coe-Mortimer Co.,m7orters 5 « Chamber St., N. Y. City 

We also distribute from Boston. Mass.; Brlpast, Maine; Baltimore, 
Mf).; Phila.. Pa,; Norfolk, Va.; Savannah, Ga.; Cmarlston, S. C. 




The College l§igna), Tuesday, January i6, 191 2. 



PI. J. Laporie, Idg. 



TH 



Proprietors of 



Hlir0-LI»EBY-)I0B8E 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 



Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 



Tel. i«j. 



ASK YOUR 

STATIONER 

FOR 



Ward'* Fountain I'eiis, Fine I'apers 
and Knvelopes, Studenls' Supplies. 
•Send for samples of Ivn^raved Invita- 
tions, Class and Kraternity Paper, 
Banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, etc. 




SAMUEL WARD CO. 



WflBD'S 



5763 Franklin Street 
BOSTON 



Trains men for attractive positions in vocations 
that are not overcrowded. 

Tuition is free to residents of Massachusetts. 

Necessary expenses are moderate. 

A CATALOG WILL BE SENT ON REQUEST 



Ail Sty /is of 



SWEATERS 
AND JERSEYS 



KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD. President 

AMHERST. MASS. 
SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



•fie 



TRADE m ^^B S) MAPK 



Complete Line of 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 
\ Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 
■ Tennis Association, 
! Nineteen Hundred Twelve Index, 
I Nineteen Hundred Thirteen Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 
I Fraternity Conference, 
I Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club. 

Dramatic Society, 

Debating Society. 

Public Speaking CourK:ll, 



Athletic Goods 
and BANNERS 



17 South College 



If you are (getting the 

THE MOST FOR YOUR MONEY 

th(*n you are eating at the 

O. K., NEXT TO POST OFRCE 

J. W. ROlKtiE, Frop. 

Have you tried our 25-cent Dinners? 
If not, why not? 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fint Repairing a Specialty 

Custom Work 

Holland's Block. Phoenix Row 



H. C. Walker, President 

Geo. H. ChapiTian, Secretary 

C. C. Pearson, Manager 

R. J. Borden. Manager 

R. T. Beers, Manager 

H H. Wood, Manager 

S. M. Jordan, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

O. G. Anderson, Manager 

F. S. Madison, Presiaent 

L. S. Caldwell. President 

J. D. French, Manager 

W, J. Weaver. President 

A. F. McDougall, President 

W. J. Birdsall. President 

J. M. Heald. President 

T. J. Moreau, President 



U^hen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



J A CKSON & CUTLER 



I. "SiA, I^A.BROVIT2C 

Teleplione Connection 

TAILOR AND PRESSER 

Fall and Winter Suits 

Chevrons and Stripes 

Put on Military Suits 

Full Dress Suits to Rent 

Gents' P'urnishings 

Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UN IFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of " Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



E E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

LKN.S OKINDI.NU 

Fm// tine of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



PROMINENCE 

Is given here to the fact that we take 

special care in the posing of 

subjects in order to bring 

out all the good 

features. 

Light and shade is skilfully diffused. 

This and the excellent finish makes 

our PHOTOGRAPHS masterpieces 

of reproductive art. 

SHIllARE'S STUDIO. 

142 Milii St., Northiipton 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 



m mm parlor 

CLEANSINO. 

PRESSING. 

REPAIRING. 

Qulckcal IM'rvic*', He»t Work, Lowrat Price 

All woilc carefully done. Work C4lli*d for and 
delivered. <irnts' overcoats, suit*, pants and 
coats. Ladies' tine linen suits a specialty. 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rear Nash Bl'k, Amherst. 



T«l. No. 342-4 



CARS 



Leave AQUIE COLLEQE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AGGIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mim. past each 
HOUR. 

SpccW Cars at Reasonable RaUt 



AIHERSI & SUNDliJLANO SI. RY. CO 



THE NEW ENGLAND NEWSPAPER 

All the news and the Truth 
about it, in the :: 

Sprlngfleld RepubllcaD 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 
News fully reported. 

BEST SPORTING PAGES 

The Weekly Republican will be sent 

free for one month to anyone 

wishing to try it. 

Daily, $8. Sunday, $2. Weekly, %i. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Vol.. XXII. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 

Amherst. Mass., Tuesday, Jan"at-y 23. •9'2- _ 



BASEBAU SCHEDULE INTERCLASS BASKETBALL, GOOD SCORES SHOT 



Sixteen Oames Announced to be Played 
Four on Campus. I 

It is a far cry from snow shoeing 
parties and ice carnivals to the base- 
ball games of spring and summer, but 
with the foresight characteristic of j 
athletic managers, M-nager Ralph J. ' 
Borden has arranged the following 
schedule for the season of 1912. It 
was approved at a recent meeting of 
the athletic board. 
April 17. Brown at Providence, R. I. 

19, University of Vermont at 

Amherst. 

20. 5 pr 1 n g f t e I d Connecticut 

League at Springfield. 
26. Williams at Wililamsiown. 
May I, Sprmgfield Training School 
at Amherst. 
4, Renssalaer Polytechnic In- 
stitute at Amherst. 
1 1, Tufis at Medford. 

17. Syracuse at Amherst. 

18, Wesleyan at Mlddletown. 

Conn. 



Contests Won by Seniors and Juniors 
I from Underclass Fives. 

The senior and junior teams were 
the winners In the two interciass bas- 
: ketball games played in the Drill Hall 
Saturday night. 

I The sophomores opposed the sen- 
iors and kept them busy every 
moment, the upperclassmen finally 
winning 7-4. The sophomores had 
1 several chances to score in the last 
I half but failed to take advantage of 
them through inaccurate shooting. 
Pearson and Gray were easily the 
stars for the seniors while Hadfield 
and Edgerton played good ball for the 
second-year men. 

In the second game the freshmen 
proved to be no match for the crack 
junior five, the latter having no trouble 
in winning 33-8. Griggs, Huntington 
and Ho#e starred for 1913. 

Saturday night the fii.al game in 
the interciass series will be played by 
I the seniors and Juniors. 



24, Holy Cross at Worcester. ' 

25. Worcester Polytechnic In- 

stitute at Worcester. 

30. Springfield Training School 

at Springfield. 

31. Norwich at Norihfleld, Vt. 
June 1, Vermont at Burlington, Vt. 

8. Trinity at Hartford, Conn. 
15. Amherst at Amherst (Pratt 
field). 



TRACK OUTLOOK 

Prospects for a successful track 
season are exceptionally bright. For 
th; past nr.onth a large squad has been 
at work which Manager Beers hopes 
to see increased within a short time. 

Coach Lawrence S. Dickinson MO 
is working hard with the squad, putting 
the most of his time into the develop- 
ment of the relay team. 

The schedule of indoor meets 
follows : 

Feb. 10, B. A. A. meet— Relay, W. 
P. I. vs. M. A. C. 
17, Columbia University m?et. 
24. Dual meet with Wesieyan at 
Amherst. 
Mar. I, Hartford meet - Relay. 
Brown vs. M. A. C. 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

At a mass meeting held Wednesday 
announcement was made of the pro- 
posed reorganization of the present 
system of student government. The 
stuaeiu body authorized tne senate to 
look into the matter of making a 
change in the form of administration 
of student affairs. It is understood 
that a more democratic form of gov- 
ernment is to be adopted, one In 
which all men. both fraternity and non- 
fraternity, will have equal part. 



By Rifle Team. Match with CoUege 
of Surgeons a Victory. 

Three matches shot, the first of ihe 
year by the rifle team against Uiuver- 
slty of Pennsylvania, the second the 
Wednesaay after with tne Col- 
lege of Veterinary Surgrons of 
Washington, D. C. and a third 
with Delaware college as the 
opponent. Th'i match with Penn- 
sylvania brought a score of 931 for a 
starter. In the next match only a 
slight improvement was made when a 
score of 933 was turned in but on Sat- 
urday the team struck a more natural 
gait and hit the targets for an even 

950. 

Edminster saved the day in the 
shoot against the Surgeons with the 
remarkably fine total of 196. He 
equalled the leage record for off-hand 
with a string of 98 and was only one 
pcii.t shy of the league record on his 
total. Wilde was second in this match 
with a score ol 190. Following Is the 
team score . 

SuwJing. Prone Totol 

A. F. Edmlnster 98 98 196 

E. I. Wlide 91 69 190 

A. F. McDougall 88 95 184 

E. R Lloyd (Capt.) 84 98 182 

E. S. Clark 87 95 182 



No. 15 
ANOTHER VICTORY 

Hockey Team Plays Fat Game Against 
S. T. S. The Score 8-a. 



448 485 
The othei men shot as follows: 



W. C. Forbush 83 

A. N. Raymond 84 

F. D. Griggs 80 

G. F. Hyde 73 



98 

96 
95 
99 



933 

181 

180 
175 
172 



R. C. Robinson '11, visited college 
for a short time last week. 



During the Interval between the 
Wednesday and Saturday matches the 

(C«m(n«s4 en |Hfl« 21 



The Massachusetts "Aggie" hockey 
team was "rignt \t\fi^-" last Wednes- 
day afternoon on the cJifge rink when 
the fast Training Schooi puck chasers 
were sent down by a score of 8 to 2. 
The Springfield skaters Invaded the 
campus flushed with a 6 to 1 victory 
over Amherst the week oefore and evi- 
dently expecting lo find the M. A. C. 
team almost as easy. But they 
reckoned without their host and after It 
was all over the manager of the visiting 
learn made th« unqualified statement 
that "the Aggies have tne best college 
team ever. 

The line-up was somewhat weakened 
by the loss of Needham, Wooley and 
I MacDonald but Jones and Hutchinson 
I were on duty and in their old time form 
and that added considerably to the suc- 
cess of the team. "Bill" Sanctuary 
broke into the limelight as some scor- 
ing star and drove them In from all 
angles. Captain Pe^kham played his 
usual fast game on the wing, and 
though he did not get a shot at the net 
his passing and blocking were always 
effective. 

Walker, Little and Ackerman made 
I up a defense that was well nigh impreg- 
I nable. Both of the opponent's goals 
came on long shots and the second one 
was a present from Ackerman who 
stopped It and then as If repenting let 
the pucK barely slide between his 
skates for a score. 

The real classy combination how- 
ever seemed to be Jones and Hutchin- 
son. They worked together like twins 
and in one instance when Berry 



SIGNAL COMPETITION 

The standing of competitors in the 
business department of the Signal up 
to date IS as follows : 
1915. 



Clough 




14.875 


Saben 


1914. 


24.750 


Davis 




16.25 


Upton 




12.50 




Scene from 



"What Happened to Jones "—Northampton, Feb. 



f? 



m 



The College Signal. Tuesday. January 23. 191 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 23. '9'-' 



handled the latter rather roughly Jones 
retaliated and the roughness ceased, 
Berry excelled for the Training School 
and both of the visitors' points were the 
result of his stickwork. Cochran, the 
Springfield leader, succeeded in break- 
ing up one or two trys for goals by his 
hard blocking on defense. 

The Training School forward line 
was rather a disappointment, only once 
or twice during the whole game did the 
visitors show any great signs of team 
work, most of their rushes being by 
individual players with no passing to 
speak of. The game was fast and 
rough and was witnessed by practically 
the entire college. 

Sanctuary was the first to score after 
five minutes had been played. On the 
next pass from center Jones sent the 
puck in after only 15 seconds interval. 
Most of the play continued around the 
visitors' goal and again Jones scored. 
The "Aggies" eased the pace some 
what, but as the end of the half ap- 
proached, swept the Training School 
defense aside and Sactuary scored 
again. The team play of the Massa- 
chusetts men was nearly perfect and 
every shot came after a series of 
passes. The second naif started with 
a goal by Berry in short order. This 
gave the visitors some life, but gained 
nothing, for Hutchinson started in to 
break things up. He and Jones 
worked together until two more points 
had been added, Hutchinson and 
Sanctuary doing the caging. Once 
more the pace was slackened and 
Berry tried a long shot. Ackerman 
made a sensational stop, only to push 
it in a moment later with his sKate. 
As the game neared its close the 
"Aggies" again assumed the offense 
and Sanctuary and Hutchinson reached 
the net. 



match, McDougall leading wth the 
very creditable score of 194: 

standing. Prone. 

A. F. McDougall 96 98 

E. R. L|oyd(Capt.) 93 99 

E. I. Wilde 91 99 
A. F. Edminster 91 97 

F. D. Griggs 93 93 



Tout. 

194 

192 
190 
188 
186 



UP-TO-DATE 



* COLLEGE FOOTWEAR* 





464 


486 


950 


The other nier 


1 also obtained 


good 


scores : 








A. N. Raym.ond 


88 


97 


185 


G. F. Hyde 


86 


98 


184 


E. S. Clark 


85 


94 


179 


F. C. Forbush 


83 


94 


177 


P. F. Whitmore 


76 


95 


171 



The llne-np : — 

M. A. c. 

Peckham, Iw 
Sanctuary, rw 
Hutchinson, o 
Jones, r 
Walker, cp 
Little, p 
Ackerman, g 



s. T. s. 

rw. Berry 

Iw. Hutchinson 

c. Patterson 

r. Bowers 
cp, Cochran 

p. Carson 

g. Briggs 



The next match will be against 
Harvard and will be shot off the latter 
part of this week or the first part of 
next week. 

The first inatch resulted in an easy 
victory over the University of 
Pennsylvania. The score of 931 was 
unusually high, for the opening of the 
season, being 38 points ahead of Har- 
vard's score, and 54 ahead of Prince 
ton's the two next highest in the com- 
petition. 

M. A. C 931 ; University of Penn- 
sylvania 871 . 
Harvard University 893 ; Deleware 

College 727. 
Princeton 877 ;New Hampshire 776, 
Norwich University 868 ; West 

Virginia University 864. 
Morth Carolina Agricultural college 
866; Louisiana University 849. 
College of Vet. Surgeons 814; 
Maryland Agricultural College 
811. 
The result of the opening matches 
are as follows: 



Elite Shoes, 
Swell Shod Shoes, 
Pumps the fit, - 



$3.50 to $5.00 

$5.00 and $6.cxD 

54.00 



EXPERT REPAIRING 



Pages Shoe Store, 



BETWKKN THK BANKS 



Score— M. A. C. 8. S. T. S. 2. Goals- 
Sanctuary 4, Jones 2, Hutchinson 2, Berry 
2. Penalties- Berry and Jones, one min- 
ute each. Keferee-Needham. Timer— 
Hayden. Time— 20-mlnute halves. 

GOOD SCORES SHOT 

[Conilnuad from page I .] 



team settled down to hard practice. 
The extreme cold outside brought 
down the temperature at the range but 
Sergt, Lee came to the rescue and 
mstalled an oil heater which helped 
considerably in raising the scores. In 
former years the team has had Captain 
Martin present at all the matches to 
keep up the enth'isiasm. This year 
the commandant has been unable to 
attend but Sergt. Lee as his substitute 
has exhibited the same interest as the 
captain and seems well qualified to 
inspire the men to do their best. Fol- 
lowing Is the team score in the last 



ELIGIBILITY RULE 

Section 1 . 
During the first semester Freshmen 
are not allowed to take part in any of 
the activities as enumerated in sec- 
tion two of this rule. (This section 
does not apply to a Freshman Football 
Team.) 

Section 2. 
No student (a) whose work in pre- 
vious semesters is incomplete In mere 
than one semester course, or (b) who 
has an entrance condition, or (c) who 
having been admitted on scholarship 
probation is found to be below passing 
at any time, shall take part in any 
public game, contest, or entertainment 
given by any club, association, or 
team of students, or occupy the posi- 
tion of manager or assistant manager 
of the same ; or editor or manager of 
I any college publication. 

Section 3. 
No student who is reported to the 
dean as below passing in more than 
one semester course at any time shall 
be allowed to continue to take part In 
any of the activities as enumerated in 
section two of this rule: further, if a 
student is repeating a course he must 
maintain a passing grade in said 
course. 



HARlilSON'S NURSERIES... 

Berlin, Maryland. 
Have over two thousand acres in Nursery Stock. 
They offer a book on 

HOW TO GROW AND MARKET FRUIT 

For 50 cents. 

•All prospective buyers are invited to visit the 

Nursery. 

They are the largest growers of fruit trees in 

this country. 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, aRd PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Fosters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Kodaks, 

Eastman Films, 

Victor Talking" 
Machines, 

Victor Becords, 

Fountain 
Pens, 

Leather Qoods. 



MILLS, 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

The best workmanship, 

The latest styles, 

Reasonable prices 

Lincoln Building, Amherst, Mass. 

The Prospect House 

-PERRY'8- 



The place to eat after the game. 
.Attractive tables and rooms. Excel- 
lent service. Catering a specialty. 



MRS. E. E. PERRY 



DEUEL'S 

DRUG STORE 



Ihere are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 



or 



C. R. ELDER 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes. 



\o3 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



^E. N. PARISEAU.o* 

Barber j^ Shop 

RAZORS HONKU 



Section 4. 
No student who has dropped from 
college or to a su:ceeding class be- 
cause of scholarship or has withdrawn 
in orJer to avoid being dropped for i 
said reason, and who is subsequently 
readmitted Is eligible to take part in 
any of the activities as enumerated in 
section 2 until he has been in college 
one semester after the date of his 
return and has satisfied the conditions 
of eligibility set forth in sections two 
and three of this rule. 

NoTB-Sectlon I of this rule l» to to Into effect 
in Seitember. 1914. 

Sections 2. 3, and 4 are to go into effect Septem- 
ber. 1912. unles« the Presidem deems it wise to put 
them in effect with the opening of this second 
Meir.ttter. 




No. 2 Ple*«int, St., Amher»t, NiMM. 



THE 



A 



Hoover & Smith Co. 

6i0 Chestnut St., PhiUdelpl>ia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 

PhlladelpliU's Official Fratemiti Jeweler 

SPECIALISTS IM 
Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings. Charms Prizes Trophies 

Medals CollcfC Pins, Fobs. Seals, 

Rings, Charms.-. 



FRESHMEN WIN 

Thursday evening in the Drill hall, 
the Freshman basketball team de- 
feated the "Short Horns" 28-8. In 
the first half 1915 ran away with the 
game, scoring at will, and making a 
total of 20 points, while their oppo- 
nents were unable to make a basket. 
In the second half, the Freshmen put 
in an entirely new team which held the 
'•Short Horns" to even terms. This 
makes the second victory for 1915. 



THE STORE 

FOR 

ETTER 
CLOTHES! 




Now that the apertures m the "hop- 
scotch" walk leading to the Entomol- 
ogical building have been filled In whh 
snow, pedestrians can reach the buid- 
Ing without risking sprained or twisted 
ankles. 



FKANK II DVMOKTH. Mr.*. 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



M. B. MAORATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 

Ofdet* Wt at the Ainhmt Mou»« wtH rec«i*» 
proli>l>l iltrntlon 




Clothing Heavily Reduced 

I l„re are plenty ..f ClothrN Sales these days, l.ut there's as n.iich difference 
l.e.w e. the., .md their meth,id., a...l what ihey r.ally mcan-aml ^''-^V"" .f » » 
your mo„ey-as there is l.ctweet. the Clothes lhe.n..elve.v We arc now holdinR our 

Semi-Annual Clearance Sale 

which ..uans that 200 Men'* High-tirade Suits a.,d ..'o Men's Overcoats will be 

sold at 1-5 off from regular price .«.,,„ 

20 Suits and Overcoats at $.6 00 •» Su.ts and Overcoat., at I.4.40 

All Stilts and (Overcoats at the same discount 
Us the buying opportunity of tlio year Don't miss it 

SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



TlIF WORTin* 'COTRELL and LEONftRD 



HIBANY, 
H.Y. 



m 



Makers 
ol 



I CAP A GO\VNS 

l o the American Colleges from the At- 
. n .1. I 11-- lantic to the I'acilic. Class Contracts a 

AmhcrMi Corner In Ralhskt-llar. 






Specialty. 

Toefll Mientka, 

Boot and Shoe Repairing, 

I i(,nc while yon wail 



1 






Aitilior-irtt, 



AlfftMM* 



J 




FALL IN LINE I ! 



Here's a chance to put yourself in solid with the girl, 
(live her a box of 



9^s 



000 



And see the diflf. 

What is a prom, without a box of candy lor th. -dd minutes? 

(Jet your orders in at once for the prom. 



Goin^ fo see Her 



That's the time when collar button* 
and ties and otiicr ll.nca often go wronn. 
Stop the peeve WiiS lalima Cigarette*. 

With rarh fiackage of FtUma you g'l a f*"- 
"nnl cnapan, 2^ nf which tecure a hanJsntrf 
Jftic»tka*pmnmta ( lix32)-t€ltcUonoJ 100. 



Henry Adams & Co. 



20 for 
IS c«nta 



Tl^*? KUXAI^L. asitort? 



«»g» tli«.- Cor-nQg* 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 23, 1912. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 23, i9>2 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Published every Tuesday evening; by 

the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural Colleg:e. 



BOAKD OF EDITORS. 

ALDEN C BRETT. 1912 EdItor-ln-Chlef. 

R. H. VANZWALENBURG 13. AMlsiam Editor. 
JESSE CARPENTER JR 1912 Manarint Editor. 
MARSHALL C.PRATT. 1912. Competition Editor 
ROYAL N. HALLOWELL. 1912. Athletics. 

JOSEPH A. HARLOW. 1912. Athletics. 

OSCAR C. ANDERSON. 1913. Ahimnt Note* 
SILAS WILLIAMS. 191?. Oepartment Nwe*. 

S. MILLER JORDAN 1913. Colleg* NotM. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

ALBERT W.DODGE. 1912 Bualne** Manie«r 

GEORGE ZABRISKIE 1913 Asm. Bvia. M»n»ger 
ERNEST S. CI *RK. JR 1914. Circulation. 

CHESTER E. WHEELER. 1914. Circulation 

STUART B. FOSTER, 1914. C'rcuhtlon. 



Jan. 28.— 9-15 A. m. Chapel, Rev. 
F. Boyd Edwards of Orange, 
N. J. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



Subscription $1 50 per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Albert W. Doooe. 



Bntorad aa Mcond-c'aas matter at tha AmhMSl 
Pan Offlea. 



Vol. XXII TUESDAY, JAN. 23. No. 15 



It is to be regretted that the condi- 
tion of the Ice on Saturday made the 
hockey game impossible. The prac- 
tice received by the team would have 
put it In better condition for the Yale 
game this week. 



At another place in this issue will 
be found a copy of the elligibllity rule 
as passed by the faculty. Th.sruie 
should be thoroughly understood by 
every studeni in order to avoid future 
trouble of the kind that arose at the 
beginning of the hockey season. 



Why Is the college store? This 
question Is one which sooner or later 
becomes forcibly brought to the atten- 
tion of every man in college. We 
have no objection to monopolies so 
long as they are run for the public 
good but any abuse of the power com- 
mitted to them, either by neglect or 
Improper business methods is to be 
especially condemned. Perhaps a 
relocation of the pool room in order to 
bring it nearer the store would help 
some or better yet perhaps the student 
body could by a subscription fund pro- 
vide a table for the personal use of the 
proprietors. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

fMotlcaa for this column should be droppsd In the 
SloMAL Office or handed to R. H. VanZwalenbur» 
"13. on or before the Saturday precedlnf each laaue ) 

Jan. 23. — 6-45 p. m.. Landscape 
Art club meeting in Wilder 
hall. 

6-45 p. M.—Stockbridge club, 
Room A, Clark hall. 

Jan. 24. — Hockey, Yale at New 
Haven. 

1-30 p. M.- Assembly, Rev. 
George M . Rowland of Auburn- 
dale. 

Jan. 27.— Hockey. Trinity at Hart- 
ford. 

7-00 p. m.-— Interclass basket- 
ball, Seniors vs. Juniors, in 
Drill Hall. 



COLLEGE NOTES 

The schedule of examinations is 
posted on the bulletin board in North 
College. 

The Y. M. C. A. will not meet 
again till after the begining of next 
semester. 

The schedule of courses for the sec- 
ond semester has been posted In the 
Social Union room. 

Prof. Ashley gave an interesting 
stereoptican talk on Switzerland be- 
fore the German Club, Friday evening. 

Henry Bond of Brattleboro, Vt.. 
spoke on "Inventoried and Unlnvent 
oried Assets," at Su "day morning 
chapel. 

In addition to the newspapers, an 
assortment of periodicals and maga- 
zines has been recently placed In the 
Union room. 

Among alumni back for fraternity 
banquets the past week were Charles 
S. Putman '09; John Blaney '10 and 
Herbert Blaney 'II. 

Dr. J. H. MacCurdy of Sprngfieid 
Training School was tiie speaker at 
Wednesday assembly. His talk was 
"Some Aspects of Health." 

The seats for the Prom performance 
of "What Happened To Jones" went 
on sale yesterday. The tickets are in 
charge of Carpenter '12 and Simmons 
•15. 

Theta Cnl held its initiation banquet 
at the Prospect House. Saturday night. 
The C. S. C. banquet was h-la 
the same evening at the Draper in 
Northampton. 

The hockey game scheduled for 
last Saturday was postponed by the 
Amherst management on account of 
poor ice. The game will probably be 
played Feb. 14th. 

On account of the final examina 
tlons for the semester b'iginning 
Saturday, the annual interclass meet 
scheduled for January 27 has been in- 
definitely postpond. 

The following books should be read 
at once by Signal competitors: Giv- 
en's "Making of a Newspaper " and 
and Shuman 's" Practical Journalism . " 
These books may be found on the 
reference shelf In the library. 

The freshman basket-ball team 
easily beat a team of "Short Horns" 
on Thursday evening by a score of 28- 
8. Friday night the freshmen were 
taken into camp In Turner's Falls by 
the Turner's Falls High School five, 
the score being 68-16. 

A flood of votes for our Unpopular 
Corner is pouring into the office. 
Present indications point to a close 
race between a certain member of the 
faculty and another member of the 
faculty. We wish to announce that 
hockey men will not be permitted to 
vote more than once. 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 




EW ELL'S 
PARKS, 

FLORIST. 

Flowers for all occcasions. 

Mail or telephone orders given 
prompt attention. 

239 Main St., Northampton 

STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

Ruas 

CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



It's a good thing not to worry about 
your pedal apparel, its correct, stylt 
comfort or durability. 

Buy your shoes from 

Bb Shop TMs TUB Style 

" Walk Over, " Haywood Shoes 

fa-So. 14-00. $5.00 



Bolles " .Special. " Stetson Shoes, 

I5.00 to 18.00 

REPAIKINC DEPAK'IMENT 

E. M. BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Next to Corner Drug Store. 



Angier, '13. 



Clark, '13 



We have a full line of Banners, Post 
Cards, College Song*, Seal Papers, Foun 
tain I'trns, Candy, Tonic and Student 
Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

BASEMENT OK MO. COLLEGE 



Eld ridge, '14. 



Tarbell, '14. 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Block 
Amherst, Mass. 



C^^rptn-ter & Morehouse, 

PRINTET^S, 



No I, Cook Place, 



Amherst, MaM. 



H. E. KINSMAN, 

Colkge PbotograpDer 

NASH BLOCK, MAIN ST., 
AMHERST, MASS. 



High-grade artistic work. Perfect satisfaction guaranteed. 

Studio newly equipped with large sky light 

and special lense for large 

groups. 

All styles the latest. Fine picture framing. 



Iowa State University made the 
high score of 951 in the first match In 
the Western League. It looks as If 
we must "go some" when the time I 
comes to settle the Inter-league cham- 
plonsh'^,. 

WAS A FRIEND IN DISGUISE 

The colleges and universities can 
weil afford to be charitable to the 
memory of their implacable enemy, 
Richard T. Cran?. the Chicago man- 
ufacturer who died recently, for Mr. 
Crane's attacks on the higher institu- 
tions ot the country rnly served to 
accentuate the good qualities cf the 
colleges, and at the same lime give a 
timely warning against the tenaencles 
of a certain small coterie of students 
to be found in every institution. The 
trouble with Mr. Crare's views was 
tnat he mistook this smaii band of 
"Indians" f^r ihe whch institution, 
and he judged the insfiiutions largely 
by these "Indians." There Is a like 
division In every phase cf life, only the 
division In coJeg-s Is more noticeable 
because of trie fact thai the cci.eges 
are in the hmeilght more. That Mr. 
Crane's own son wnt through Yale 
and turned out 10 be successful in his 
father's business is rather strong proof 
that the colleges are not thoroughly 
discredited. " £jrc^cr«|'^. 



class, and that a copy be published in the 
College Signal. 

Leland H. Taylor, Sec, 
. For the Clsasof 1914. 



Whereas, It has pleased God In His infi- 
nite wisdom to lake unto Himself the father 
of our l)eloved classmate, Arthur F. Kings- 
bury, be it. 

Resohvd, That we. the members of the 
class 1912. do extend to him and his family 
our heartfelt sympathy in this, their hour of 
sorrow, and be it further, 

Resoh'ed, That copy of these resolutions 
be sent to our bereaved classmate, that a 
copy be filed in the records of the class, 
and that a copy be published in the College 
Signal. 

Silas Williams, i p^^ 

Robert W. Wales, / Class 

LjkWPENCE P. ROCKWOOD, 1 



the 



Whereas. It has pleased Cod In His mfinite 
wisdom to take unto Himself the father of 
our friend and brother. Malcolm Noyes 
Goodwin. ihi»refore. be it 

Resotued. That we, the members of the 
Kappa Sigma Fraternity do extend to him 
our sincerest sympathy in this, his hour of 
grief : and be it further 

Resoli>ed, That a copy of these resolutions 
be sent to the bereaved family, that a copy 
be inscribed in the records of the fraternity, 
and that a copy be published in the Co lege 
Signal. 

Mareh^ll C Pratt 

Samuel P. Huntington 

Stuart B. Foster. 



"Crops With The 
G uesswork LeFl Qui" 

THE FIRST EIGHT PRIZE CROPS OF CORK ON STOGKBRIOGE: 



itjo 4 busheU harvested; 111.6S busliels crili Hrv. 
10.577 

852 

849 

8v»h 

So.w 

7715 

7<>M 



KlO.J I 

It). 8 

110 
101.^ 

987 

no 4 

R9.7 



(■«illins»ille, (Oiiii. 
Monmouth. Mi- 
( •lanbv. Mass 
Maabiiiv. N II 
S |)e«-itu-l«l. Mass 
> l>i-ciliekl. M.fs* 
N ha'slon. Ma**. 
Itrocklon, Mass, 



•TA/J shows that the soils of Afnsstuhme/ts are not yet reaiiy to hi 
ahandoned" PR. //. W'. H'lLEV 

A i 2-page illustrated pamphlet givii g full 
particulars will be sent to any address 



DAU/l/pp Fertilizer Company 

\3\J 11 IVuil 43 Chatham St. Boston 



•i 



F. A. SHEPARD 

MEN'S STORE 



For the 

Fraternity. 



RESOLUTIONS 

yi^reas. It has pleased God in His infinite 
wisdom to take to Himself the father of 
our friend and classmate. Malcolm Noyes 
Goodwin, therefore, be it 

Resolttd, That we. the members of the 
class of 1915 of the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural college do extend to him our 
sincerest sympathy in this, his hour of grief; 
and be it further 

Resolvtd. That a copy of these resolutions 
be sent lo the bereaved family, that a copy 
be filed In the records of the class, and 
that a copy be published in the CoLLeoe 
Signal. 

Herbert W Bishop. I For the 

Harold M. Rogers. V Class of 

Everett LeRoy Haskins. | 1915 



Whertas. It has pleased God in His infinite 
wisdom to taka to h imself the father of our 
beloved brother. Arthur French Kingsbury ; 
therefore, be it 

Resolved. That we. the members of the 
Theta Chl Fraternity do extend to him our 
sincerest sympathy la this, his hour ol 
grief : and be it further 

Resoiued. That a copy of theae resolutions 
be sent to the bereaved family, that a copy 
be filed fn the records of the fraternity and 
that a copy be published in the College 
Signal. 

Roger A. Warmer. i p^^. ^^^^ 
George Atwell Post. . Fraternity. 
John D Pellett. ) ' 



Kuppenheimcfs 
Fine Clothes 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



WImmis, The father of our friend and 
classmate, William H Komp. has been 
taken into eternal rest with God, be It 

Resolved. That we. the members of the 
class of 1915 of the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural college do cxtendto him our sincerest 
sympathy in this, his hour of grief, and be 
it further 

Resolved. That a copy of these resolut- 
ions be sent to the bereaved family, that a 
copy be filed in the minute book of the 
class, and that a copy be published in the 
College Signal. 

Herbert W. Bishop, ^ For the 

Harold M. Kogees. , Class of 

Everett Leroy Haskins. > 1915. 



Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOM TKIIORING A SPECIALTY 

Thomas Hemenwav, 12, M. A. C. Representative 




roc/ WILL FIND 
A FULL LINE 
OF 



Wht*eas. God in His infinite wisdom has 
taken to Himself the father of our friend 
and classmate. Walter Goss Kllbourn. 
therefore be it 

Resolved. That we. the members of the 
class of 1914 of the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural college, do extend to him our deepest 
sympathy in his time of trouble ; and be it 
further 

Rasotved. That a copy of these resolutions 
be sent to our bereaved classmate, that a 
copy be placed on file in the records of the 



DEPARTMENT KOTES. 

HORTICUUTURE. 

Prof. F. A. Waugh contributed an 
article on horticultural education In 
Europe to the new American Cylope- 
dla of Education soon to be published 
by the Macmlltan Co. 

ENTOMOLOtJY. 

W. S. Regan and O. C. Bartlett 
spent several days In Philadelphia the 
first week In January, studying ento- 
moliglcal collections there. 

Several gifts ol spraying apparatus 
have recently been received by the 
department. 

EXTENSION DEPARTMENT. 

The extension department has de- 
cided to hold a school of apple pack- 
ing from Feb. 12 to 24. The school, 

' will be under the personal direction of 
Prof. F. C. Sears, head of the work In 
pomology, John C. Casiuer. expert 

' apple packer of Hood River, Oregon. 1 
will be the instructor of the school. 

Besides practical work in packing, the Jl^g COlleRe DrUg StOfB 
course will Include lectures on plant- ^ 

ing, fertilizing, pruning, spraying and 
on the management of orchards. The 



DUDLEY 

f>UTriTTKk IN 

Fine Athletic Goods 

FOR EVERY SPORT 




TOBAOOO 



AT 




•The Best In Tnc World' 
Write for ( ataloge. 



Charles H, Dodley 

HANOVKK, - - N. H. 

Af(ent, HAZSN *14 



'• t 



The Collefe Signal, Tuesday, Jauuary 23, 1913. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 23, 191 i. 



COODS FOR MEN. 



'^ f*9\ 



IV. 



C. & K. Derbys, 
Keiser Cravats, 



A 



4j. (ff^^ } E^S'ish and Scotch Woolens. 



TH£ BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 



AMHERST. 



DARTMOUTH. 



<VxVW»i(ft^^^^A<Vft^^6a66«VVS^SrtiVW^^^ 



Highest Grade Roses 

We are offering to our local patrons, selection from our large 
stock of ftnest Roses. es|jecially grown for the Nkw York and Boston 

I'l OWKR MAKKKrS. 

THE MONTGOMERY CO., Inc., 

MADUEIY, MASS. 

TELEPHONES. 

Amheri>t. I9t>-R. 
Northampton. t>tfO. 



GENUINE • THGM&S • PHOSPHAFE • POWDER 

Basic Slag Meal 

Grows Big Red Apples and Other Fruits 

TROPHIES WON BY USERS OF 

Genuine - Thomas - Phosphate - Powder 

AT THI 

GREAT NEW ENGLAND FRUIT SHOW 
Held at Boston, Mass.. October aj-aS, 191 1 

International Apple Shippers' Association's Cup for Mcst ( oimnetcial Kx 

l>il)it rif I'ackf'l Irint Won by i otiyer s I .u m, ( • A Drew, Mgr . Conn. 
Silver Cup lor Best Display of Baldwin Apples ottered by <.overnor 

Foss. iif M.iss.ii lni-etts. \\ on by I K Wifisor. klirxic IsLinrl 
Silver Shield for Best Hxhihit of Rhode Island (Ireeninjcs ottered by 

Jioveriior l'othi«-r, of Kltmle Island. Won by T K Winstor. Kltode Isbnd. 
$2S.m) Cash for Best Barrel of King Apples offrred by W & h DougKis 

(.'omp.iny. of COniicitii iit Won by I lij,4h KoRers. ( onnecticut 
First Prixe for Best Barrel of Rhode Island (Ireenlnxs. Won by Klijah 

Koijers, ( cjnrifcticilt. 

First Prize $AO.O0 Best 5 Boxes of Apples. Any Variety or Varieties. 

Won l>y ( (jiner's |-.um. <. A Drt-w. Manager. (. <»iine( lictit 
Second Prize $29.00 for Best S Boxes of Apples. Any Variety or 

Varieties. Won by N S \\ joM.r. Rhode Island. 
First Prize Best Box Bxhibit of Apples. Won by Conyers Farm. (j. A. 

Urew, M.uia>jcr, Connccti< m 

Silver nedaU Best Packed Bxhibit of Apples. Won by Conyer's Farm, 

(< A Drew. .M,iii.ii;er, t onnecticut 

First Prize Best Box of Rhode Island GreeninKS. Won by T. K. 

Winsor. Khoiic Isl.iiui 

Sweepstakes for Best Box of Apples Packed for Market $75.00. Won 

liv Tonyer's Farm. <'t \. Drew, Manager, Connrcttcut. 

Berlin Prize $29.00 Cash and Silver Medal. Won by Conyer's I arm, 

*. A. Drevv, \Iaiiat;fi. <'onne< ticiit. 
Connecticut PomoloKical Society -Silver Medal for Best Table of Fruit. 

Won In' Conver's l-^arni. (',. A. Drew. C.eneral Manasc^. Connertirtit 
Massachusetts Agricultural College Sweepstakes for Winning Largest 

Number of Prizes. Won by Conyer's Farm, (i. A. Drew, Manager, Conn. 

Nuiiieroii'! f HlnT !'■ \/f^. Wnii bv almvc an'l other users (>eiiui?i^ Tliomas Ptiosphate t'ii«(ier 

Why Not Put YOUR Fruit in the Prize Winning Class by Purchasing 

GENUINE THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

Key-Tree Brand. From 

THE GOE- MORTIMER COMPANY 

51 Chambers Street, New York City 

Oiii Booklfl. I p ' ■ I ' it • Iruit (irowins witli Thomas Phosphate I'owdt'i." is ^etit tree it \,,|, 

mention The College .Signal. 



} course will be limited this year to 
forty In number and a fee of $10 will 
j be charged. 

Mr. Story lectured at Buzzards Bay 
Saturday afternoon on "The Present 
Status cf Darying in Massachusetts. 
I Professor Hurd lectured Thursday 
I night on "Potatoes," as one of the 
I speakers in a winter course of lectures 
given under the auspices of the War- 
lands Dairy School of Boston. 

The extension department is mak- 
ing preparations to co-operate with 
the Child Welfare Congress to be held 
in Northampton. Feb. 1st ard 2nd. 
Professor Hurd will talk, and there will 
be an exhibit of clean milk. 

The Massachusetts Agricultural 
College is to devote Wednesday, 
March 13. to the dairy interests of the 
state. There will also be at least one 
lecture each day of farmers' week 
upon dairying. This day will be given 
over almost entirely to dairying and 
its allied subjects. There will be 
three strong addresses upon dairy sub- 
jects from 8-30 to I 1-30 A. M. The 
Massachusetts dairymen's association 
at 1 1 30 A. M. will hold their first 
annual meeting. All members are 
strongly urg-d »o be present, as well 
as all pejph who are interested in 
bettering the dairy interests in this 
state, e;>p-c;iail^ those who desire to 
become memb-rs of the association 
New officers fur the fnsulrg year wili 
be elf-cted and new by-laws to the con- 
stituiljn voted upon at the business 
tneeting. 

In the aftrrnoon. the program wili 
consist for an hour and a half of dairy 
cattle demonstration and the dedica- 
tion of the new animal husbandry ; 
building. One of the big features of ; 
dairy day will be the dairy show which 
will be in progress during the day. 
There will be three classes of milk, 
five classes of cream, including mar- 
ket and creamery patron's cream, and 
three classes of butter, including 
creamery and farm dairy butter in the 
show. The dairy day of 1911 proved 
to be one of the striking features of 
farmers' week, with over 400 dairy 
people in attendance. Prof. W. P. 
B. Lcckwood, associate professor of 
dairying m the college anticipates a 
very much larger attendance this year, 
as dairymen in the state are becoming 
more interested in what the college is 
trying to do for them and the fact that 
the program is much better this year 
and the milk show will be much larger. 
The January issue of the Facts fcr 
Farmers, which is published by the 
extension service is devoted to a very 
practical, concise article upon "Plant- 
ing an Orchard," by Alvah J. Nor- 
man. Considering the great interest 
which is being shown in orcharding in 
New England, the subjecf is very 
timely. 

Manila grieves over the departure 
of the troops for China — it breaks up 
a crack baseball team. 



I 

I 

I and am interested in NEW FINGLANlj 
AGRICULTURK and have devoted a 
Special Department of my business to 
the handling of FARMS and COl'N. 
TRY HOMKS with F. I'. MAR.STO.N. 
N. H. '81, as Manager. Correspondence 
solicited. Send for RAYMOND'S RK[) 
LKTTER, Farm and Country Home 
Edition. Reliable agents wanted. 

T. H. RAYMOND 

Central Square, Cambridge, Mass, 

E.B DICKINSON D.D.S 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

OrrirE llotiis: 

etu isa.A.. Art. i.u«>tc>^F>. JV1. 



FOR FARMS ! 

Big, Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building I^is 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W R BROWN 
Savings Bank Kl'k, 



.Amher«t. 



Mass 



AMHERST 



Co-op Laundry 

Hi^h-Gradi College Work 
LAUNDRY 



Shirts. 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same. r»»ugh dry, 



10 15c 
ic 

2C 

40c per tl«>/ 
250 per do/ 



Ralph R Parker, agent. C. S. C. House. 

85 Pleasant .St. 

Francis S. Madison, agent for 11^15 and 

short course. Vet Lab. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Fred S .Merrill, agent, C S C. House 

85 Pleasant St. 
Put full name and address on laundry 



Wriglit&Ditson 



Heidqairtirs 
for 



Athletic Supplies 



L^wn^ri'nni. CoUfge StiltflfltS 

Golf 

Banket Ball 
Foot Ball 
Hockey 
Track and 
Field .Sports 



4 
J 



and Athletes who 
want the real, su- 
perior articles for 
the larlous sports^^ 
should insist upon**' 
those bearing the 
Wright & Ditson 
Trade Mark 



Catalogue Free 

Wright & Ditson 

JJ4 Washington Street, Boston 

New Yorti Chicago 

San Francisco 
Providence Cambridge 

R. H. PowEKS, Agent, h South 




ALUMNI NOTES 

'02. — C. I. Lewis the author of a 
big bulletin on "Frost Fighting in the 
Orchards of the Rogue River Valley, 
Oregon." 

•06.— W. O. Taft and Mrs. W. 0. 
Taft. formerly Miss Sanborn '05, 
were presented on Dec. 31 with a 
daughter, Rosamond Blake Taft. 

11. — A. P. Bursley has been 
employed as superintendent of parks 
for Si. Petersburg, Fla. As this is a 
hustling growing town with a big 
northern colony, and as an extensive 
new park system is being planned, the 
opportunity looks like a good one. 
Bursley began his duties Jan. 1. 




THE 
SMOOTHEST 



Ck Vallej SL % Unes 

FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations,violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

a; Main St.. Masonic BIdg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE NOTES 

Dr. John Gier Hibben has been 
chosen to succeed Woodrow Wilson 
as president of Princeton University. 

In a recent address before the stu- 
dents of Tufts and Jackson colleges 
Dr. A. A. Berle declared that the col- 
leges are now on the defensive and 
must seek to regain a higher plans. 
The idea that college graduates are 
picked bodies of men and women with 
high idea s and finer notions about life 
is a passing superstition, he said. He 
is of the opinion that the standard of 
Ideals that used to be maintained has 
been discarded. 

A young editor has caused a stir In 
the New York State Normal college 
at Albany by a statement In the college 
paper that more than 50 per cent of the 
students cheat in their examinations. 
President Davis declares that no such 
serious condition of things exists; 
Indeed, he says that cheating in 
examinations has been reduced to a 
minimum by a system of "strict su- 
pervision." Incidentally the "honor 
system" for examinations comes up 
(or discussion. Dr. Davis says that he 
doesn't know of any place where all 
supervision Is withdrawn from the ex- 
aminations or tests upon which any- 
thing of considerable Importance de- 
pends. Doubtless It Is not so much 
the system as the spirit that deter- 
mines the matter. If the general 
morale of a school or a class is high 
there will be little to fear from dis- 
honestv. And morale Is largely a mat- 
ter of personality of teacher and pupil. 
The former must inspire respect ; the 
latter must have seriousness of pur- 
pose. But it is altogether likely that 
the young editor, like some other 
older ones, has been a little too anx- 
ious to produce a sensation without 
due weighing of the evidence and the 
consequences. 



r 



rrCW sophomores but have a smok- 
* b.g Laowledge of Velvet — tho 
prcalcst iA tobacco leaf — the olden 

cays mclhod of curing by aging — 2 years of hanging in the 
warehou.j unc!v:r pcriect conditions — a perfect scasoning- 
.richov/ir.jrl'..:.t dispels every vestige cf leaf harshness — a sweet, 
smooth flavor cf tobacco that challenges the best smoke you 
ever crperienced. Can't bum hot — can't bite I Smoke it as often as 
yoj w J it is always tl»c sanie delightful pipcfti — Velvet — amooth. 
T,Klay cr cry lime you say— xX all dealers. 

SPAULX>ING & MERRICK 

CHICAGO 




10 



Full Two 
Ounce Tina 




I 



WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 

In so far a> our bt-nefitN a\x- mutual. 

THE AMHERST CAS COMPANY 

Everything Electrical 



Scbool and College PbotosrapDers . . . 




, f^f^At lY' sa Center St., Northampton, Mass., 
i.<jO«i-t-r. 3 ^^^ g^^^^ Hadley, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from r A. M. to 4 A.M. 



A* I •!« dlnictlT connected wtth a Wholes»le 
lIouM, I can 

SAVE YOU MONEY ON CLOTHES 

will be ple«»e<l to nhow sampleR •n«l style* of 
Winter SuU« «di1 0»erco«w. 

H. B. WHITB, I9»». Hunt* Block 
Up One Flight 



Main Office: 

1546-1548 Broadway. 

New York City 



These Studios offer the best skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment ohtainahle 



M.D. UILMAN. 



I STEAM I 11 UNO. telephone y^-^■ 

C. A. MorrET. GAS FI TTINO. TINNING 



If jrou w>Dt to be 

SOLID WITH THE OIRLS 

you roust have your clottie* presacl and cleaned 

ATIIP8TBIW8 

II Amity St. Maroon Store 

^Msalac ai^ Cleaning a ap««ialty 

rrMaws aiiM y^^'^JS^j'iick^ .,.t«iD In town 



TELBPHONB 'o";'^ I QHARLES DANCE 4 SON, 
GILMAN and MOFFET, 



Manufacturers of and Wholesale Healer* 

CONFECTIONERY. 

lOTtoSU Maiw 8tk»kt. 

WoRCESTKK, Mass. 



PLUMBERS. 



Specialty of Repairing 

Church Winikjws, 
Memorial Windows. 
Lf.ao Lhjhts, &c. 
« Clifton Ave.. AMHERST. MASS 



>.-« 4 • 



m. J. Laporle, Idg. 



I'roprittors of 



mirO-LIIfEBy-HOBSE 



Tel. 183. 



Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 



ASK YOUR 

STATIONER 

FOR 



Ward's Fountain l>ns. Kine I'apers 
ami Knvclopes, Stutlfnis' Supplies. 
Send for samples of Kn^ravt-d Invita- 
tions, Class and fraternity Paper, 
hani|tiet Menus, Visiting Cards, etc. 




SAMUEL WARD CO. 



WHRD'S 



5763 Franklin Street 
BOSTON 



Ail S/y/ts oj 



SWEATERS 
AND JERSEYS 



TRAOFP*! 



•MAPK 



'«ToN. MA*- 



•o,***^*"..* 



Complete Line of 

Athletic Goods 
and BANNERS 



17 South College 



If you are setting the 

THE MOST FOB TOUB MONET 

then you are eating; at the 

O. K., NEXT TO POST OFFICE 

J. W. KOItMK, Prop. 

Have you tried our 25-cent Dinners? 
If not, why not ? 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fmt Repairinq a Specialty 

Custom Work 

Holland'.s Block, Phoenix Row 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 23, 1914. 



XHE 



Massachusetts Agricultural Gollese 



Trains men for attractive positions in vocations 
that are not overcrowded. 

Tuition is free to residents of Massachusetts. 

Nece.ssary expenses are moderate. 

A CATALOG WILL BE SENT ON REQUEST 



KEN YON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Nneteen Hundred Twelve Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Tnirteen Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club. 

Dramatic Society, 

Debating Society. 

Public Speaiting Cou.x:il, 



H. C. Walker, President 

Geo. H. Chapman, Secretary 

C. C. Pearson, Manager 

R. J. Borden, Manager 

R. T. Beers. Manager 

H H. Wood, Manager 

S. M. Jordan, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

O. G. Anderson, Manager 

F. S. Madison, Preslaent 

L. S. Caldwell. President 

J D. French, Manager 

W. J. Weaver, President 

A. F. McDougall, President 

W. J. Birdsall. President 

J. M. Heald, President 

T. J. Moreau, President 



IP hen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



J A CKSON & CUTLER 



I. XI. r^A-BROVITflC 

Telephone Connection 

TAILOR AND PRESSER 

Fall and Winter Suits 

Chevrons and Stripes 

Put on Military Suits 

Full Dress Suits to Rent 

Gents' Furnishings 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

JACOB Reed's Sons, 



Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. 



Z424-1426 Chestnut St., 



PhiladelfUhia, Pa. 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

LENM OKIMDINO 

Full lint of ColUgt Jrwelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



PROMINENCE 

Is given here to the fact that we take 

special care in the posing of 

subjects in order to bring 

out all the good 

features. 

Light and shade is skilfully dilTused. 

This and the excellent finish makes 

our PHOTOGRAPHS masterpieces 

of reproductive art. 

SHILURE'S STUDIO. 

142 Mill) St, NorthamiitoD 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber 5hop 

All work of a first class order. 
EUctrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 



THE TEIti>$y PARLOR 

CLEANSING, 

PRESSING. 

REPAIRING. 

Uulckvel »ertrl«M>. Brst Work, Loweat Fricw 

All woik carafully done. Work called for and 
delivered, (ientk' overcoats, suits, pants and 
coats. Ladies' tine linen suit* a specialty. 

Wn. FRANKLYN. Prop. 

Rear Nash Bl'k, Amherst. Tel. No. 3«a-4 



CARS 



Leave AQOIE COLLEQE for HOL- 
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CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AQOIE COL- 
LEOE at 7 and J7 mim. paat each 
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SfMcW C«r« «t Reasonable Rates 



AIHERSI t SUNOIRLANO ST. RV. CO 



THE NEW ENGLAND NEWSPAPER 

All the news and the Truth 
about it, in the :: 

Springfield Repiibllcan 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 
News fully reported. 

BEST SPORTING PAGES 

The Weekly Republican will be sent 

free for one month to anyone 

wishing to try it. 

Daily, %8. Sunday, $j. WeeAly, $1, 



THE COLLEGE SIGNA' 



Vol. XXII. 



MASSACHUSETTTS j4iGRICULTURAL COLi-EJGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, February 6, 1912. 



I 



i 



NINE FOOTBALL GAMES ] MASSACHUSETTS ALUMNI 



Oti the Card for Next FalL Three New 

Rivals. Two Home 

Games. 

There are nine games on the foot 
bcill schedule as announced yesterday 
I / Manager Warren J. Covlll. Two 
of these games will be played on 
Campus. Contrary to newspaper 
report Rhode Island State remains on 
lie schedule from last season. The 
new comers on the list are Union col- 
lege and Vermont. Boston college. As 
usualthe final game of the season will 
be with our ancient rivals, S. T. S. 

The schedule : 
S-pt. 21, Rhode Island at Amherst. 

28, Union college at Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 
Oct. 5, Dartmouth at Hanover, 
N. H. 

12, Boston college at Amherst, 

19, U. of Vt. at Burlington, Vt. 

26, Holy Cross at Worcester. 

Nov. 2, Tufts at Medford. 

9, N. H. State at Manchester, 

N. H. 
16, S. T. S. at Springfield. 



Come Together in Annual Meeting at 

Parker House in 

Boston. 



RIFLE TEAM 



A DEFEAT AND A VICTi^a.Y 



Wins Three More Intercollegiate 

Matches. Tied for Firat with 

Princeton. 



RELAY TEAM 

The M. A. C. relay team won the 
f ['St race it has run this season, in 
2 40 flat, against the Tufts team at 
I lie Coast Artillery meet In Boston 
Jan. 27. 

Captain Clapp, Caldwell, T. W. 
Nicolet and D. G. Tower made up the 
team, each running 320 yards in the 
ordsr named. Every man tooic the 
banks and tagged in faultless style. 
On this showing the track manage- 
ment basis it hopes for a team which 
will equal the crack four of 1909-10. 
At the pistol Clapp took a big lead 
from his man ; this was widened by 
She three men following and Tower 
came In at the finish with the lead of 
a third of a lap. All the men finished 
well. The time ranked second for 
intercollegiate relays at the meet, 
Brown alone making better time in Its 
race with Holy Cross. 

The next race Is with Worcester 
Tech at the B. A. A. meet Saturday 
night. 



The annual reunion and dinner of 
the M. A. C. Alumni club of Massa- 
chusetts was held at the Parker House 
In Boston last Friday evening, and 
proved to be the most successful affair 
ever held in the history of the organ- 
ization. Fully 100 "old grads"' sat 
down to the heavily laden banquet 
tables In the famous crystal dining 
room of the hotel. Another 127 sent 
letters of regret at being unable to 
attend, at the same time sending best 
wishes and pledging new allegiance to 

M. A. C. 

The faculty was represented by a 
large delegation as were also the 
trustees. Nearly every class boasted 
at least one member In attendance, 
the class of '75 tying with 1911 for the 
largest number present. The dinner 
was excellent and served in a delight- 
ful manner. After the cigars had 
been brought on the members enjoyed 
a short program of songs and speeches, 
dispersing at 1 1 o'clock. 

The toastmaater'a chair was occu- 
pied by Atherton Clark '77, retiring 
president of the club. With a few 
Introductory remarks he Introduced 
President Butterfleld as the first 
speaker. After the new and the old 
yells for "Prexy" had rung out, the 
President spoke Informally on "The 
one big excuse for M. A. C." In 
which he outlined the purpose of the 
college, and set the task of the insti- 
tution to be to so direct Its work that 
It may be of the largest possible ser- 



The Rifle Team continues Us fine 
record, and according to official re- 
turns won easily the second and third 
rifle matches of the series. Our team 
is steadily improving and bids fair at 
the present rate, to equal the fine record 
made by the team in previous years. 
In the match with the U S. College 
of Veterinary Surgeons the team shot a 
score of 933, as against 805 for their 
opponents. In the match with Dela- 
ware the riflemen set the high mark of 
the season at 950,defeating their rivals 
by a margin of 151 points. 

Results for the Eastern Intercolle- 
giate League are as follows: For 
weekending Jan. 13th. 

M. A. C. 

U. S. Col. of Vet. Surg. 

Princeton, 

No. Carolina Agrlc. Col. 

Harvard, 

West Va. University, 

Maryland Agric. Col. 
Delaware Coi. 
University of Penn. 
New Hampshire Col. 
Norwich University. 
Louisiana State Univ. 
For week ending Jan. 20th 
M. A. C. 
Delaware Col. 

Princeton, 

Norwich Univ. 

No. Carolina Agric. Col. 

University of Penn. 



933 
805 

924 

907 

936 
841 
833 
778 

867 

817 

884 
898 

950 
799 

913 
875 

915 
879 



|C«nttniisdcn pace 2.1 



[Conllnuades pac« 21 



The Lot of Ho<key Team in Gamaa 
with Yale and Trin- 
ity. 

Trinity was never dangerous In the 
hockey game at Elizabeth Park, Hatt- 
tord, Jan. 27ih. The Aggie puck 
chasers scored nine tinries to Trinity's 
once and under favorable conditions 
might have run up an even larger 
score. 

Playing in an undersized rink with a 
stiff wind sifting snow over the enclos- 
ure , consistant team work was out of 
the question. Trinity was on tlw 
defensive the greater part of the time, 
with the entire defense clustered about 
the cage to handle the peppery shott 
of the * "Aggie" forwards. 

Capt. Peckham was the bright 
individual sUr of the game with Uw 
goab to his credit, one In the flnt 
period and four In the second. 
Sanctuary made two goals and Jonea 
and Hutchinson added one apiece. 

For Trinity Captain Burgln and 
Bleecker showed up to best advantage 
in Individual play, but the team work 
of the Hartford aggregation was ex- 
ceedingly ragged. Occasionally they 
Invaded the Aggie territory for a few 
swift shots at the goal which Acker- 
man had no difficulty In handling. 
Their lone tally came at about tha 
middle of the second period when 
Bergwin managed to get by the defence 
and caged the puck at short range. 

The first half opened up fast, with the 
puck constantly In Trinity's territory. 
After a succe»»l<m of shota CafMaln 
Peckham, Hutchinson and Sanctuary 
each caged the puck once. In the 
second period Trinity's Increasing 



NOTICES 

The hockey game with Amherst 
college will be played Wednesday, 
Feb. 14. Manager Wood has 
arranged a game for Feb. 16, the 
day of the Junior Prom, with M. 1. T. 

All tickets for the Dramatic Pro- 
duction that has been ordered will be 
f^served only during this week. Then 
t^ey will go on sale at Northampton. 
Jesse Carpenter '12. 




Scene from "What Happened to Jones "—Northampton. Feb. 15, 







The College Signal. Tuesday, February 6, 191 4. 



Inability to advance the puck took 
much of the snap out of the scrim- 
mage. Peckham's tour goals with one 
each by Sanctuary and Jones com 
pleted the score. 

M. A. C. TRINITY. 

Hutchinson, c c, Walker 

Jonei, r r. Burgwin. (capt.) 

Peckham. (capt.). iw rw. Bleecker 

Sanctuary, rw Iw, Howell 

McDonald, op cp. Little 

Walker, p p, Johnson 

AcKcrman. g. g. Bassford 

Score— "Aggies" 9. Trinity 1. Goals— 
Peckham 5, Sanctuary 2, Hutchinson, 
Jones. Burgwin' Referee— Williams of 
Yale. Umpire— Breed of Trinity. Timer 
— Brown. Coal judges — Putnam and 
Brainerd. 



900 
defaulted 



The Yale hockey team defeated the 
M. A. C. team at New Haven Jan. 
24th by the score of 3 to 0. Yale 
was unable to score at all in the first 
half, In which period the visitors had a 
slight advantage of the play. The 
Aggies seemed faster on the ice and 
worked a clever passing game, keep- 
ing the puck In Yale territory through- 
out the first part of the period. 
Toward the end of the period Yale's 
play improved and her stubborn defense 
especially by Howe and Gore, kept 
her goal from danger. Yale's shoot- 
ing was more accurate throughout the 
game and only many fine stops by 
Ackerman. prevented a Yale score. 
The Individual skating and dodging and 
puck-carrying of Howe was especially 
brilliant. 

In the second half Yale's play look 
a big brace and improved in speed and 
passing. The play was almost con- 
stantly about the Aggie goal, good 
work by Ackerman preventing many 
scores. Howe and Gore did brilliant 
individual work for Yale and Hutchin- 
son for M. A. C. 

Cox scored the first goal In two 
minutes from a scrimmage. The 
second score came In 1 I 1-2 minutes, 
after Gore had carried the puck the 
length of the rink, outskating the entire 
Aggie team. He made a good shot 
and on the rebound Cox caged the 
puck, Chauncey scored the last goal 
on a difficult shot from the side, which 
Ackerman partially blocked The 
game was marr-d by soft ice. 

The line-up : 

YALE. „. f,^ c. 

Thayer, g g, Ackerman 

A. Howe, p p. McDonald 

Gore, cp cp. Walker 

G°x- >■ r, Jones 

Harman (capt ), o c. Hutchinson 

Martin, Iw rw. Sanctuary 

Chauncey, rw Iw. (capt.). Peckham 

Score— Yale 3, M, A. C 0. Goals— by 
Cox 2, Chauncey. Penalties— Cox I min- 
ute. Jones 2 minutes. Referee— Norfolk. 
A. A. Umpire— Marcus, Yale. Time— 
20-minute halves. 



Harvard Univ. 
Maryland Agric. Col. 

In the fourth match that with Har- 
vard University, the rifle team made 
the score of 945 was made as against 
928 shot by the Crimson. Three of 
the team, McDougal, Lloyd and Hyde 
made perfect scores on their prone 
strings. Edminister was high man 
with 194. Harvard is considered one 
of the best teams In the eastern sec- 
tion of the rifle league. 

A Boston daily commenting on the 
match said that "Harvard deserves 
great credit to hold second place In 
the league considering the fact that 
they have to compete with the crack 
Massachusetts Agricultural College 
combination." 

The scores are as follows : 



UP-TO-DATE 



Edminister, 

McDougal, 

Wildft, 

Lloyd, 

Hyde. 



Standing, Prone, Total. 



* COLLEGE FOOTWEAR* 



Elite Shoes, 
Swell Shod Shoes, 
Pumps the fit, - 



^3.50 to $5.00 

$5.00 and $6.00 

$4.00 



97 
90 
91 
86 
86 



97 
100 

98 
100 
100 



184 
190 
189 
186 
186 



Totals, 450 495 945 

Average, 189 

The match between M. A. C. and 

the Maryland Agricultural College was 

shot on Jan. 27. Another good score 

was made, the total being 942. 

Griggs secured 100 on his prone string 

while McDougal was high man with 

93. 

The scores follow : 



EXPERT REPAIRING 



Pages Shoe Store, 



BETWEEN THE BANKS 



McDougal. 

Wilde, 

Lloyd, 

Raymond, 

Griggs, 



Standing. Pron». Total. 

95 98 193 

92 99 191 

90 98 188 

88 98 186 

84 100 184 



HARRISON'S NURSERIES.,. 

Berlin, Maryland. 
Have over two thousand acres in Nursery Stock. 
They offer a book on 

HOW TO GROW AND MARKET FRUIT 

For 50 cents. 

All prospective buyers are invited to visit the 

Nursery. 

They are the largest growers of fruit trees in 

this country. 



MASSACHUSETTS ALUMNI 

[Continued from page I] 



RIFLE RETURNS. 

(Contlnuad from page I .] 



New Hampshire Col. 799 

U. S. Col. Vet. Surgeons, 761 
West Virginia Univ. 873 

Louisiana State Univ. defaulted 



vice to the commonwealth, and the 
nation at large. 

William Wheeler '71, spoke on the 
"Purpose of the college fulfilled," 
and was followed by Joel E. Gold- 
thwaite '85 who took for his subject 
"Setting the Standard." Dean Lewis 
was next called upon to speak on a 
most vital subject. "The Condition of 
Athletics at M. A. C." A more 
masterful and sympathetic treatment 
of the subject could not have been 
delivered and with the eloquent tribute 
he tendered to President Butterfield 
and his praise of Professor Hicks, he 
succeeded In establishing himself in 
ihe warm corner of the heart of every 
M. A. C, man present. A few words 
on "Backing up the College," spoken 
by Evan P. Richardson '87 and the 
singing of the college song brought 
the festivities to a successful close. 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, Mil PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 




MI 

rHOTOGKAmER 

The best workmanship, 

The latest styles. 

Reasonable prices 

Lincoln Building, Amherst, Mass. 



DURHAM - DUPLEX The Prospect House 

RAZOR 



If yoQ want to be 

AOLID WITH THE OTRLS 

you must hare your clothes presneil and cleaned 

AT BPSTBZBr'S 

11 AmUy St. Maroon Store 

Preasing and Cleanlnfr a ap'-ctatty 

MoHi liberal ticket •yatcm In town 



tiS Oc^&^tai 



The Razor you have 

always seen at $5.00 

^ 35 Cents Each ^ 

For this lot 



PERRY'S 



The place to eat after the game. 
Attractive tables and rooms. Excel- 
lent service. Catering a specialty. 



MRS. E. E. PERRY 



OEUEI-'S 

DRUG STORE 



There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

GOAL 



O? 



C. R. ELDER 



The Collefc Signal, Tuesday, February 6, 1912. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



^E. N. PARI5EAU.J* 

Barber j^ Shop 

RAZORS HONED 



No. 2 PleaMOt, 5t., Amherst, MaM. 



THE 



HooverA Smith Go. 

616 Chestnut St., Philsdelpbis 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 



Philadeipkla's Official FraternitY Jeweler 

SPECIALISTS IN 
Frstcrnity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prises Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals. 

Rings, Charms.-. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'83. — The presidential address of 
H. J. Wheeler delivered before the 
American Society of Agronomy 
appeared in Science for Jan. 19, 1912. 

'83.— S. M. Holman, Atthboro, 
has just been elected president of the 
Attleboro Board of Trade. 

»04.— The College Journal oi Jack- 
son College, Jackson. Miss., pays a 
warm tribute to the president of the 
institution, Zachary T. Hubert, a 
graduate of Atlanta Baptist College 
and of M. A. C. '04. 

'07.— Present address. J. Thomas 
Caruthers, R. F. D. No. 6, Box 120. 
Columbia. Tenn. Resigned as prin- 
cipal of an industrial school. 

'09.— Guy E. MacGown has bought 
a farm at Chase's Mills. Maine. 

'09. — Myron W. Thompson. Ad- 
dress Cody, Wyo.. care U. S. Forest 
Service. Forest Assistant on the 
Shoshone National Forest. 

•|0. — F. P. Nlckless leaves San 
Francisco, Feb. 6?h, for the Philippine 
Islands where he has accepted a posi- 
tion as agricultural expert. 




THE STORE 

FOR 

ETTER 
CLOTHES! 



1 



At I km (ilrectir conne<^«<l with • Wliol<-»slr 
llouac, I cMn 

8AVK YOU MONKV ON CLOTIIKS 

will he |.lf«iif<l to show Mim|ile« atxl «ilylc»«f 
Winter .suii» ami Overcoaui. 

It. It. WHITK. IflLt. limit ■ Block 
L'liUne night 




Clothing Heavily Reduced 

There are pleiily of Clothes Sales tluse days. l>ut tlierc's as nmch diflcrence 
between tliein and their inethocis, an«l what ihey really mean— and what you Ret for 
your money— as there is between tlie I lothes themselves. We are now holding our 

Semi-Annual Clearance Sale 

which means that 200 Mens Misli (iiade Suits and 120 Men's Overcoats will be 

sold at 1-5 off from regular price 
30 Suits and Overcoats at |i6 00 18 Suits and Overcoats at $%AAO 

All Suits and Overcoats at the .name discount 
It's the buying oppt>rtunity of llie year. Don't miss it 

SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



TlIF Worthy 'CQTRELL and leohurd 



I RANK H. DANFORTtI, Mgr. 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



Amherst Corner In Ralh<«kellar. 



ALBANY, 




Mikirs 

•f 



OOWNS 

To the American Coi'egesfnnn the At- 
lantic to the I'acitic. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 

Orders left at the Amhervt Houtc will receive 
prompt attention. 



Toefil Mientka, 

Boot and Shoe Repairing, 



I.)one while you wait. 



^tllllOfMt^ 



I^fnasai. 



... STATIONERY ... 



Make your correspondence distinctive. 

Make it express your individuality and personality. 

Let others feel your pleasinR presence even though you may be far 

Your Stationery is the first intimation of your message. 
Its correctness will not be questioned if you select 

SYMPHONY LAWN 

It is sold only at this store. 2 dozen sheets and envelopes in a box 



Jl gathering in Billyhs room. 

"Wlicn good fellowe get to- 

?;ether" there's always a call 
or Fatima Cigarettes. 

^Ilhtachpockat* of Fallma pou get a prnnani 20 tot 
coupon, 25 of thick Mcun a hanJtome fell <e ...f 
tWfcg. immaia U2 m 32) mUction of 100. *' **""* 



Henry Adams & Co. 



Ttie K15:XAI-rI-r ®tor«3 



«_»i»tli<fcj_0^>r^g£| 




M 



The College Signal, Tuesday. February 6, 191 a. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 6, 191 2. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Afrfeultural Collefre. 



BOABD 07 EDITORS. 

ALDEN C. BRETT. 1912 EdItor-ln-ChW. 

R. H. VANZWALENBURC. 13. Aulatant Editor. 
JESSE CARPENTER, JR .1912 MMWflnB Editor. 
MARSHALL C. PRATT. 1912. Competition Editor 
ROYAL N. HALLOWELL. 1912, Athletic*. 

JOSEPH A. HARLOW. 1912. Athletic*. 

OSCAR G. ANDERSON. 1913. AhimnI Note*. 
SILAS WILLIAMS. 1912. D«p«rtment Nolee. 

S. MILLER JORDAN 1913. College Note*. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

ALBERT W.DODCE. 1912 BuatneM Manager. 

GEORGE ZABRISKIE. 1913 Asm. Bus. Manager 
ERNEST S. CI ARK. JR.. 1914. Circulation. 

CHESTER E. WHEELER. 1914. ClreuUtlM. 
STUART B. FOSTER. 1914. C'rculaflon. 



Subecriptlon $1.50 per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Albert W. Dodce. 



Offlea. 



■I the Amtam 



Vol. XXII. TUESDAY, FEB. 6. No. 16 



COLLEGE NOTES 

Exams over — nothing to do till 
June. 

Sophomore class elections will be 
held after Wednesday assembly. 

Four special cars will be run to 
Northampton for the Prom dramatics. 

R«v, F. Boyd Edwards of Orange, 
N. J. was the speaker at Sunday 
chapel. 

Mandolin club rehearsal will be held 
at 7 o'clock, Wednesday evening in 
the chapel. 

The firm of Allen & Birdsall an- 
nounce that their "Hot Pupomobile" 
will open Feb. 8th. 

Tomorrow night the Dramatic 
Society will present "What Happened 
to Jones" In the Greenfield Opera 
House. 

The "Olee Butch" held its annual 
post-examination banquet in North- 
ampton, Saturday night. The favors 
evoked special admiration. 

The student body was addressed on 
Wednesday afternoon, Jan. 24, by 
Rev. George M. Rowland of Auburn- 
dale. Mr. Rowland spoke on the 
work of President Clark in Japan. 

All men intending to go to the Jun- 
ior Prom on the 16th should notify 
the committee if they have not 
already done so, in order that accom- 
modations may be provided for all. 

The postponed basketball game 
between the Junior and Senior classes 
which is to be the final game of the 
class championship series will be 
played Saturday night in the Drill Hall. 

The Princeton University rifle team 
is still tied with our riflemen for first 
place in the Eastern Rifle League, 
neither having lost a match. Iowa still 
continues to shoot good scores in the 
Western League. 

The issue of the Independent for Jan. 
25 contains material by two members 
of the faculty. Prof. Frank A. 
Waugh has an article on "Rough- 



housing" and Mr. Wattles of the Eng 
lish department has contributed a 
poem. 

CAMPUS CALENDAR 

(Notices for this »)lumn should be dropped In the 
SloMAL Office or handed toR. H. VanZwalenburg 
'13. on or before the Saturday precedlnr each Issue ] 

Feb. 6— 6-45 P.M.,Stockbridge club. 

Room G, South College. 

7-00 p. M., Landscape Art 

club. Wilder hall. 

Dramatics at Greenfield. 

Hockey, Springfield Training 

School at Springfield. 
Feb. 7—1-30 p. m., Assembly. Pres. 

K. L. Butterfield.mass meeting. 
Feb. 8—6-45 P. M.. Y, M. C. A. In 

chapel. 
Feb. 9—6-00 p. m., College Night, 

Draper hall. 
Feb. 10— Hockey, West Point at 

West Point. 

Relay race vs. W. P. I. at 

B. A. A. meet. 
Feb. 11—9-15 A. M., Chapel, Dr. 

Albert P. Fitch of Cambridge. 

COMMUNICATION 

(Communications to the Signal concemine mat- 
era of ceneral Interest are welcomed. The Signal 
Is not to be held responsible for the opinions thus 
expressed ) 

Editor College Signal: 

Dear Sir : 

While I am not likely to be con- 
sulted by the governing powers of 
M. A. C I cannot refrain from 
expressing my disapproval of the new 
"Eligibility Rule" recently published 
In the The Signal. I firmly believe 
that the students who are representing 
the college in the several student enter- 
prises are entitled to more leniency In 
scholarship than those who are doing 
nothing for their Alma Mater except 
to stand on the sidelines. 

If the present rule had been strictly 
enforced In the past some men who 
have represented the college would 
never have done so, yet these men 
have ^ovn up well since graduation 
with all their intellectual deficiency. 
To back up this assertion, but at the 
risk of being considered egotistic, I 
am going to cite my own case for then 
I can hurt no one's feelings by invid- 
ious comparisions. 

When I was a sophomore at Aggie 
I had a condition In Surveying and 
also in Physics and yet was working on 
both the 1 907 Index board and The 
Signal as well, while later on I was 
editor-in-chief of the latter and at the 
same time had tailed to pass two con- 
dition exams in Physics and was tak- 
ing that strenuous course over again. 
This new rule would have put "the 
kibosh" over me. 

Yet I graduated fourth in my class, 
with an average for the four years 
around 85f , made Phi Kappa Phi, 
then graduated from a law school with 
a Cum Laude and have managed 
since to pass the bar examination and 
stay with "the bunch" so far out In 
the long race. I cite my own example 
as one of many where the present 
marking system has utterly broken 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



E WELL'S 



PARKS. 

FLORIST, 

Flowers for all occcasions. 

Mail or telephone orders given 
prompt attention. 

239 MilN St., Northamptoi 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUQS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

and 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 




It's a good thing not to worry abou 
your pedal apparel, its correct, style 
comfort or durability. 

Buy your shoes from 

The Shop Ms The Style 

" Walk Over, " Haywood Shoe . 

13-50, $4-00, $5.00 



Bolles " Special, " Stetson Shoe- 
95.00 to $8.00 



REPAIRING DEPARTMENT 

E.M. BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Next to Corner Drug Store. 



Angier, '13. 



Clark, '13 



We have a full line of Banners, Pom 
Cards, College Songs, Seal Papers, Fou 
tain Fens, Candy, Tonic and Studci.t 
.Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

BASEMENT OF NO. COLLEGE 



Eldridge, '14. 



Tarbell, '14. 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Block 
Amherst, Mast. 



C&rptn-ter & MoreKoust, 



No I, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Maaa. 



H. E. KINSMAN, 

College Photographer 

NASH BLOCK, MAIN ST., 
AMHERST, MASS. 



High-grade artistic work. Perfect satisfaction guaranteed 

Studio newly equipped with large sky light 

and special lense for large 

groups. 

All styles the latest. Fine picture framing 



down In practice and proven that, ' 
except in extreme cases, eligibility for 
college representation anywhere would 
be independent of class-room ability. 
Clinton King '07. 
Boston, Jan. 25, 1912. 

CELEBRATION RULES 

The foilowing rules have been drawn 
up by the senate committee on cele- 
brations of athletic victories : 

1 . General Character. Celebra- 
tions will consist in general of the 
following : 

1. Ringing of Chapel bell. 

2. Firing of blank ammunition. 

3. Bonfire. 

4. Special stunts to be direct supervis- 

ion of committee. 

1. Chapel BS -%\\%\\ not be rung 
later than one-half hour after news of 
a victory is received. 

2. Fire Arms—\t> be used subject 
to agreement between the student 
committee and the military department. 

3. Bonfires— i^^W be built under 
the direction of the committee and 
when conditions permit in the vicinity 
of the pit. 

4. Special Stunts — to be under the 
supervision of the committee. 

2. Time. All celebrations shall be 
scheduled to commence at 8 o'clock 
on the evening of the victory. 

3. Relation of celebration to tht 
pr(^rty of the college and of individual 
citizens. The property of the college 
and individual citizens shall be held 
inviolate and material for bc.flres shsll 
be taken only from material provided 
by the treasurer of the college and 
kept at designated places. 

4. Responsibility of Committee. 
The committee will endeavor to 
enforce the letter and the spirit of 
these rules but will jt be held resoon- 
sible far acts committed without its 
express direction. 

5. The committee hereby desig- 
nates the following baseball games as 
being deemed worthy of celebration: 
Spring of 1912— Tufts. May I 1 ; Am- 
herst, June 15. 

The chapel bell shall be rung for a 
period not to exceed one-half hour 
immediately following the receipt of 
the news of any athletic victory, ten- 
nis being especially excepted. 

The committee consists of Brett 
and Parker of 1912 and the class cap- 
tains of the four classes and will have 
absolute power to initiate, direct and 
control student celebrations. 



ferent courses that may be taken and j 
these cover a wide range of agricul- 
tural subjects. Courses in shade tree 
management, entomology, poultry and 
dairy arithmetic may be given another 
year. 

One of the big features to be held 
at the college March 11 to 15 will be , 
, the corn show. 

I A. R. Jenks of the extension 

jdepartrr.ent gave an illustrated lecture 

' a week ago Tuesday evening under 

the auspices of the Stockbridge Club 

on his trip through Canada and the 

fruit sections of the Pacific coast. 

ENTOMOLOGY. 

Requests have been made for an 
advanced course in beekeeping. This 
course is being arranged for 1913. 
Entomology 8. the present course In 
beekeeping, has been changed to a 
Junior subject, elective to Seniors, 
but should precede the advanced 
course. 

ZOOLOGY. 

The department has received two 
very fine specimens of fossil shells 
from Cap'ain Wm. A. Armstrong of 
San Juan, Porto Rico. Captain Arm- 
strong was a graduate of the class 
of '99. 

C. D. Roberts '13 has presented to 
the geological museum a small mis- 
cellaneous collection of rocks and 
minerals. 

There has been added to the 
zoological museum the skeleton of a 
deer and a South American tapir 
whicn were presented by the New 
York Zoological Society. 



SOIL ROBBERY 

" Uncle Henry" Wallace, who presided over the great Conservation 
Congress at Kansas City last Sept.ml)er, said that as a nation we had 
been "soil miners," mining and selling tl>e surplus i.( available feitility 
which had been stored up for aj-es. l)Ut that now we v\cie ".voil lol.l.trs. 
The surplus of available fertility of enormous tiadsof tillane lan«i has 
been mined on an extensive scalr, so tliat in many sections the product 
of the land lias been reduced to the 'natural yield." that is, a yield based 
on the amount of plant food rendered available from yrar to \ear. which 
in turn is measured by the weakest link in the chain of fertility _ It can 
not be foretold in wliat hour or in what year tht- weaktst link will be dis- 
closed, but it is there and it may mean ureat l«)ss. , ,• 1 

To preach dependence on potential sc.il fertility m llie weakrst link 
is not only poor economy and A/</ ftfiics, but it is unst ientitir, 111 that it 
will lead to crop bankruptcy and commercial loss Hathi-r pieacii in the 
growing of any crop, restoration of the plant (o<»d which it has remover), 
not only as cro/> hisuranif, but to maintain the integrity of the soil 
I'rof. Stockbridge taught: .... •,•.!. 

" If the soil machine is a good one so much the better : it it lias a 
balance of crop producing power to its credit, let us preserve that balance 
for an emergency. Let us not draw on it for present ne. ds ' 



tt 



STUDY THE PUNT FOOD PROBIENI 



BOWKER 



Fertilizer Company 

43 Chatham St. Boston 



Kuppenheimcfs 
Fine Clothes 



RESOLUTION 

Whertas, It has pleased God in his infinite 
mercy to take unto himself the father of our 
friend and brother, Walter Jos Kllbourn, 
therefore be it 

Resolutd. That we the members of the C. 
S. C. fraterniiy do extend to him our slncer- 
est sympathy in this his hour of grief, and 
be it further 

Resolufd. that a copy of these resolutions 
be sent to the bereaved family, that a copy 
be filed in the records of the fraternity and 
that a copy be published in the College 

Signal. 

Ralph R Parker. 
C. H. Brewer, 
L E. Smith. 



tURNISHTNGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOW TAIIORING k SPECIALTY 

Thomas Hemsnway, '12, M. A. C. Representative 



For the 
Fraternity. 



YOU WILL FIND 
A FULL LINE 



F. A. SHEPARD. 

MEN'S STORE 




DEPARTMENT NOTES. 

EXTENSION. 

The extension service of the col 
lege is extremely gratified with the 
way in which people of the state are 
availing ihemseives of the correspond- 
ence courses. Nearly 200 people 
have enrolled In the courses since 
Sept. 1. 1911. This Is In addition to 
the 200 students who were enrolled 
previously, and are continuing their 
studies this year. There are 13 dif- 



INTERCOLLEGIATE NOTES 

Clark College and University is In 
the throes of an epidemic of mumps. 

The South is unique In having the 
largest group of colleges in the United 
Stales playing all sports under one set 
of laws administered by one body — 
the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic 
association. This association com- 
prises the states of Kentucky, South 
Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, North 
Carolina, Alabama, Louisiana, and 
Mississippi. Texas and other states 
were formerly members, but have 
since withdrawn to form separate asso- 
ciations of smaller size. This large 
southern association has existed since 
j 1894 in comparative harmony — some- 
: thing rare among similar American 
college organizations. 



OF 




DUDLEY 

OUTriTTKR IN 

Fine Athletic Goods 

FOR EVERY SPORT 




TOBACCO 



AT 




•The 5tST In The World" 
Write for cataloge. 



The College Drug Store 



Charlfi!; H. Duty 

HANOVKR, - - N. H. 

Agent, IIAZEN M4 



^ 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 6, 191a. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 6, 1912. 



GOODS FOR MEN. 




C. & K. Derbys, 
Keiser Cravats, 



.N 






English and Scotch Woolens. 



LIFE OF HENRY HILL GOODELL 

THE FORMER PRESIDENT OF M. A. C. 

The late Dr. Goodeil was one of the 
first professors called when the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College opened 
its doors to students in the autumn of 
the year 1867, and his services were i 
continuous until his death in the spring! 



I 



and am interested in NEW ENGLANI) 
AGRICULTURE and have devoted .: 
Special I^epartment of my business td 
tlie handling of FARMS and COUN 
TRY HOMES with F. P. MARSTON. 
N. H. '8f, as Manager. Correspondt-nce 
.solicited. Send for RAYMOND'S REIj 
LETTER, Farm and Country Homt- 




THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

DARTMOUTH. 



AMHERST. 



^^/yvwvs^aaa^^yy >• • 



of 1905. His particular department Edition. Reliable agents wanted. 

I 

was modern languages and English! "t. H. RAYMONO 

literatuie; he also taught at various u.,,,,,^, Square, Cambridge, Mass 
limes, military tactics and gymnastics,* 

zoology and entomology, anatomy and I- p niPtflNCnM R R C 
physiology, rhetoric, English history, t. D. UluVVlllOUrl U* U.O. 

and was librarian of the college from 



Highest Grade Roses 

We are offering to our local patron.s, selection from our large 
stock of finest Roses, especially grown for the Nkw York and Huston 
Ei.owKR Makkkis. 

THE MONTGOMERY CO., Inc.. 

hadi_e:y, mass. 
telephones. 

Amherttt. t96-R. 
hlorthampton. bbO. 



GENUINE ■ THQMAS • PHOSPHATE - POWDER 

Basic Slag Meal> 

Grows Big Red Apples and Other Fruits 

TROPHIES WON BY USERS OF 

Genuine - Thomas - Phosphate - Powder 

AT TH^ 

GREAT NEW ENGLAND FRUIT SHOW 

Held at Boston, Mass., October 33-38, 1911 

International Apple Shippers' Association's Cup for Best Commercial Kx 

liihii of l'.icke<l [fuit Won hy < Olivers l-.irni. (;. A Drrw, .Mgr , ( cmn. 
Silver Cup for Best Display of Baldwin Apples offered by (iovernor 

FosN. of Massa. hiisetts. Won i»y I. K. Wiiisor. Kho.le Isl.ind 
Silver Shield for Best Rxhibit of Rhode Island (JreeninKS offered l,y 

(iovernor I'otliirr. of Kliode Island Won hy T. K VVinsor. Rhode Island. 
$25.00 Caah for Best Barrel of Klnic Apples offered l.v W . & \\ Douglas 

Comp.tiiy, of Connecticut Won l)y Klijah Kogers, ( o'nnccticut. 
First Prize for Best Barrel of Rhode Island (Jreeninics. Won by Elijah 

Ko;;ers, t'oniifCticut. 

First Prize $90.00— Best 5 Boxes of Apples. Any \ariety or Varieties. 

Won l>v ("onyer's Kami, (i. A Drew, .Maiia;;;r. Coiinec ticnt. 
Second Prize $25.00- for Best 5 Boxes of Apples. Any Variety or 
Varieties. Won by N. S Winsor. Khode Island. 

First Prize -Best Box Exhibit of Apples. Won by Conyer's Farm, (.. A 
Drew, Manager, Connecticut 

Silver riedal— Best Packed Rxhibit of Apples. 

(i. A. Drew. Mat^a^;er, ( "oiint( ticiit. 

First Prize Best Box of Rhode Island (ireeninjcji. Won 

Winsor, Khode Island. 

Sweepstakes for Best Box of Apples Packed for Market $75.00. 

by Conyer's Farm, C.. A. Drew, Manager, Connecticut. 

Berlin Prize -$25.00 Cash and Silver Medal. Won by Conyer's Farm, 
('. A. Drew, Manatjer. Connecticut. 

Connecticut PomoloRlcal Society -Silver Medal for Best Table of Fruit. 

Won by Conver's Harm. (",. A. Drew, (.eneral Manager, C onnecticut. 
Massachusetts Atcricultural College Sweepstakes for Winning Largest 
Number of Prizes. Won by Conyer's Farm, (i. A. Drew, .Manager, Cf)nn. 

Numerous Other I'ri/'-s. Wnn by alxive .ind uflipr u^cr* CnMiuiiir Thomas F'hosi.h.itp I'liWiipi 

Why Not Put YOUR Fruit in the Prize Winning Class by Purchasing 

GENUINE THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

Key-Tree Brand. From 

THE COE- MORTIMER COMPANY 

51 Chambers Street, New York City 

Our Biiokl"!. "rii toDate Priiit Orowinc; with Thonian Phosphatf I'owrlpr." is sent free if von 

mention I he College Signal. 



1885 until 1899. He acted as presi- 
dent during a part of the year 1883 
and was permanently elected to that 
office in 1886. 

His college classmate and lifelong 
WWVyyybAAt*---. ••••••.•. friend. Reverend Calvin Stebbins of 

Framlngham, has prepared a volume 
descriptive of President Goodell's life. 
The book comprises a memcir of 134 
; pages together with a collection cf his 
more imoortant preserved addresses 
which occupy 185 pjges. the latter 
including his farewells to the cUsses of 
1887, 1888 and 1890. The chapter 
entitled "S-.ld.er" is an edited col- 
lection of his letters to his family and 
to a few classmates written while he 
served in the 25th Connecticut, being 
one of the reglinerts cf the 1 9th Army 
Corps commanded by G-neral Banks, 
which had for its ocJ»ctive the capture 
of Port Hudson. Th?se letters are 
fascinating beyond description and will 
prove especial.y so to every one of his 
former stuaents. They tell the siory 
of a joy&us and brave spirit who passed 
through tnriilng exp-riences ana 
endured terrible haraships for the sake 
of the country he Lvcd. The letters 
lilt the veil forthetirst lime from a 
brief period of his life hitherto unknown 
to any but a very few of his most 
intimate fri-nds. 

The third ch;*pier of the memoir 
telis of President Gocdell's connection 
with the Coilrge from the time of his 
inv.tation to become one of Its instruc- 
tors until his death on board a steamer 
of the Savannah line, at 1-45 Sunday 
morning, April 23. 1905. It gives in 
miniature a history particularly of the 
early struggles cf the College for 
recognition, and describes the large 
part he had in its growth and develop- 
ment. Letters are presented from 
President W. E. Stone '82, and Dr. 
E. W. Allen '85, relative to his work 
in behalf of the College and of agricul- 
tural education ; aiso letters written 
him by the late Senators Merrill and 
H-5ar, the late Governor Russeil and 
Senator Tillman. 

In the concluding chapter which 
contains a brief appreciation prepared 
bv his lifelong frierd. Sir Chentung 
Liang Chang, former Chinese minister: 
to the United States, Mr. Stebbins 
points out in his inost effective way the 
many admirable traits of character 
possessed by our beloved teacher and 
friend and concludes the memoir with 
the words : "He was a brave soldier, 



Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Orvirr. Hot RS: 

FOR FARMS ! 

big, Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Kuilding Lots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W R BROWN 

Savings Hank iil'k, 

Aniher«t. Maas 



Won by Conyer'.i Farm, 
l>y T. K. 
w..., 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

Hii^h-Graiic Colle^^e Work 
LAUNDRY 



shiri». 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Pl.iin wash. 
Same, roiijjli dry. 



•0-I5C 

2C 
IC 

40c per dojt. 
aSc per Am 



l<;ilph K I'arker. agent, C. S. C. House. 
S5 rica.saht St. 

Francis S .Madi.son, agent for 1915 and 
sliort course, \tt. I.al>. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Fred S. Merrill, agent, C. S. C. House 

85 I'lt-as.iiit .St, 
Put full name and Midrcss on laundry 




mis cmioeoE 

SHOULD BE 
IN THE HANDS 
OF EVERY ONE 
INTERESTED IN 
ATHLETIC SPORT 

MMtIrd Frrv 



Kxperienced user* 
itgrrp that Wright 
& Oit^Dti articles 
are lupvriar. '1 hev 
are deniRDcd and 
made by men Mho 
itee.xjNrrtsand who 
know liow to inpthe 
Rouds then)M>lves 



Complete Equipment for Lawn 
Tennis, Base Ball, (iolf. Cricket, 
Track and F'ield Sports, Basket 
Ball, Foot Ball and Lawn Uamea 



Wright ^ Ditson 
La«n I ennis ( tuide 
10 Cents 



Wright & Ditson 
Base Ball (iuide 
10 Cents 



To save tim* addrtts our nearest store 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

344 Washington 5t., Boston, flass. 

NEW YORK CHiCAUO 

11 W.irreii .>^t. 119 N. Wabash Ave, 

SAN FRANCISCO 
359 Market St. 

PROVIDRNce, R. I. CAMBRIIKIE, MASS. 

7'i Weybosset St. Harvard Square 








SUGiR 



... \ 



DtMriaon*iyT '^''/HL 



SUNCIKUMD 
it 1 




an inspiring teacher, an able adminis- 
trator, an active citizen, and a dear, 
good friend" — when the tiistory of 
agricultural education is written "he] 
will appear as a wise and courageous | 
pioneer and be assigned to his rightful 
place by an admiring and grateful 
posterity." 

The writer of this notice cannot too 
strongly commend the book to all who 
Knew President Goodeil and especially 
to every alumnus and former student 
of M. A. C. It is issued by Messrs. 
H. O. Houghton & Co. of Cambridge. 

J. B. LiNDSEY '83. 



JWiYflKJbil 



Conn. Valley St. \ Lines 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
m.iterial and we have excellent roses, 
carnations,violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
.<jur orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

27 Main St., Masonic BIdg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from I A. M. to 4. A. M. 



ALUMNI MEWS 

'82. — The recently elected board of 
directors of the Baltimore & Ohio met 
m New YurK re^-eniiy and organized. 
Oscar G. Murray, ioriner president ol 
the company, was continued as chair- 
man oi the D^ard, and tne old ofticers 
were re-elected as follows: Daniel 
Willard, president ; George F. Ran- 
dolph, first vice president ; George 
M. Shriver, second vice-president ; J. 
V. McNeal, tourlh vice-president and 
treasurer; C. W. Wooiford, secretary, 
and H. L. Bond, general counsel. 

This marks the deginning of Presi- 
dent Wiliard's tnird term as the head 
of this Corporation. He was chosen 
first on Jan. 15, 1910, was re-elected 
in December of the same year and 
now again the reins of leadersnip have 
been placed in his hands. Since 
coming to the Baltimore & Onio he 
has impressed his own strong person- 
ality in its management. When he 
came to the road he was almost im- 
mediately met with a trade dullness 
from the effects of which ail transpor- 
tation lines suffered. Despite this the 
6 per cent, dividend has been earned 
and paid and he says it will be main- 
tained. In securing this result for the 
stockholders, President Wiilard has 
not neglected the property. To lis 
maintenance and increasing efficiency 
ne has devoted all his energy and 
resourcefulness. He has added to its 
tracKage and equipment and the road 
is now said to be in shape to handle 
promptly and economically all the 
business which may come to it. 

President Willard came to the road 
knowing its necessities. He urged on 
the board expetiditures sufficient to 
correct the weaknesses known to exist. 
His greatest feat in that connection 
was. perhaps, the building of the third 
track over the Allegheny Mountains. 
This was to avoid any possibility of a 
return of the congestion encountered 
iti 1907, when tlie Baltimore & Ohio's 
coal tonnage was the greatest In its 
history. On his advice $50,000,000 
was tjorrowed for this and other work. 
The improvements were mapped out 
under his direction and will be carried 
to completion under his supervision. 
They are now nearly finished. 

"This work alone will stand as a 
lasting monument to Wiliard's fore- 
sight and ability," said a stockholder, 
"even if he did nothing else to further 
the road's prosperity." 

General Manager A. W. Thompson, 
of the Baltimote & Ohio railroad has 
appointed C. C. Riley as assistant to 
the general manager with headquar- 
ters at Bahimore. Mr. Riley will 
have supervision over transportation 
efficiency, particularly with reference 
to the utilization of equioment, its dis- 
tribution and proper loading and move- 
ment over the road and through 
terminals. 




W 



"11" 



THE 
SMOOTHEST 



PUSH it along— shoot it 
over! Velvet — so-called 
because exceedingly smoolh 
-snrtoolh because aged over 
two years, in which time all 
larshness disappears from the 
! \ xf leaving the goodness that 
\/e all crave for our pipe. Velvet 
13 a tobacco mellowness hitherto 
un'tnown -too $m(H)th to harbor 
a "bite." It's ju^t tb<? sort of a to- 
l> ceo you woulJ m^lce for your- 
-elf. MiUionsofmf-n cheer (fjf it. 
We never knew o( a man who 
didVt like Velvet I Hurrah! Dont 
1 t it pa<s yoti. At ail d -alcrs. 

SPAULDING k MERRICX 

CHICAGO 




i 



Full Two 
Ounce Tins 



WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 

In so far as our benefits arc nuitiial, 

THE AMHERST GAS COMPANY 

Elverythiing Electrical 



ScDool and College PDotograpbcrs . . 




I 00 A/ / Y- sa Center St., Northampton, Mass., 
L.KJ\^fM,^r. 3 ^^^ g^^^^ Hadlcy, Mass. 



Main Office: 

1546-1548 Hroadway, 

New York City 



These Studios offer the lie.st skilled 
artists and mo.st complete 

equipment obtainable 



M.D. OILMAN. 

TELEPHONE 1079-3. 

GILMAN and M OFFET. 

' Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 

IN 

CONFECTIONERY. 

t07tulll Maim Stkkkt. 

WoRCKSTKR, Mass. 



I -MAM FITTING, Telephone $9-4- 

C. A. MOrrET. GAS FI 1 I INr., TINNING. 



CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PLUMBERS. 

Specialty of Repairing 

Church Winoows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Li(iHTS, &c. 
6 Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MASS 



^r 



.s-^- 



8 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 6, 191 2. 



m. J. Lepo[ie, IDC. 



Proprietors of 



flOrO-LIVEBY-PBSE 



Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 



Tel. 183. 




ASK YOUR 

STATIONER 

FOR 



Ward's Fountain I'ens, Fine I'apers 
and Envelopes, Students' Supplies. 
Send for samples of Kngraved Invita- 
tions, Class and Fraternity Paper, 
Banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, etc. 



SAMUEL WARD CO. 



WflBD'S 



5763 Franklin Street 
BOSTON 



All Sly Its of 

SWEATERS 
AND JERSEYS 

TRADE (PI ^^B fi> MARK 

^°« Ton MAS* 
Complcle Line of 

Athletic Goods 
and BANNERS 



17 South College 



If you are getting the 

THE MOST FOR TOUR MONET 

then you are eating at the 

O. K., NEXT TO POST OFFICE 

.1. U. IIOI'MK. Prop. 

Have you tried our 25-cent Dinners? 
If not, why not? 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 

Custom Work 

Holland's Block, Phoenix Row 



HE 



Massachusetts As:ricultural College 



Trains men for attractive positions in vocations 
that are not overcrowded. 

Tuition is free to residents of Massachusetts. 

Necessary expenses are moderate. 

A CATALOG WILL BE SENT O/V REQUEST 



KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD. President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Thirteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Fourteen Index, 

T > M. w. A. , 

Fraternity Conference, 
Musical Association, 
Stockbridge Club, 
Rifle Club. 
Dramatic Society, 
Debating Society, 
Public Speaking Council, 



H. C. Walker, President 

Geo. H. Chap.nan, Secretary 

W. J. Covill, Manager 

R. J. Borden, Manager 

R. T. Beers. Manager 

H H. Wood, Manager 

S. M. Jordan, Manager 

O. G. Anderson. Manager 

E. S. Clark, Manager 

F. S. Madison, President 

L. S. Caldwell. President 

J. D. French, Manager 

W. J. Weaver. President 

G. W. Ells, Secretary 

Geo. Zabriskie, Manager 

J. M. Heald. President 

T. J. Moreau, President 



mien Fitting Out Your Room 



Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



J A CKSON & CUTLER 



Telephone Connection 

TAILOR AND PRESSER 

Fall and Winter Suits 

Chevrons and Stripes 

Put on Military Suits 

Full Dress Suits to Rent 

Gents' Furnishings 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 



Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Binjo, Mandolin, ind Guitar Strings 

LKNS GKINDISO 

Fullline of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



PROMINENCE 

Is given here to the fact that we take 

special care in the posing of 

subjects in order to bring 

out all the good 

features. 

Light and shade is skilfully diffused. 

This and the excellent finish makes 

our PHOTOGRAPHS masterpieces 

of reproductive art. 

SHILURE'S STUDIO. 
142 Mill St, Ngmuftu 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 



THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CLEANSING. 

PRESSING, 

REPAIRING. 

Quick***! i»»rvic», Brst Work, L.oweat Fric-f 

All wuik catefully done. Work called for and 
delivered, tit-nt^' ovrrcojtt, suitH, pants and 
coats. Ladies' hne linen suit* a st>ecialty. 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rear Nash Bl'k, Amherst. 



Tel. No. 34a-4 



CARS 



Leave AQUIE COLLEtiE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



1424-1426 Chestnut St., 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



Leave AMHERST for AQOIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mlm. past each 
HOUR. 

SpccW Car* at RaaMnaMa Rates 



AIHERST k SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 



THE NEW ENGLAND NEWSPAPER 

All the news and the Truth 
about it, in the :: :: 

Springfield Republican 



Massachusetts .Agricultural College 
News fully rep>orted. 

BEST SPORTING PAGES 

The Weekly Republican will be sent 

free for one month to anyone 

wishing to try it. 

Daily, %8. Sunday, $J. IVeekly, %i. 



■RiE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Vol.. XXII. 



MASSACHUSETTS AORICULTURAL COLLEOE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, February 13, 1912. 



No. 17 



RELAY TEAM WINS SHOW AT GREENFIELD »« BOOST OLD AGGIE" 



VICTORY AT WEST POINT 



Over Worcester Tech at B. A. A. Meet 
in 3 min. 15 3-5 sec. 

Saturday evening at the 23d annual 
B. A. A. games the M. A. C. relay 
team defeated the fast W. P. I. In 
what proved to be the most exciting 
race of the meet. 

The team labored under difficulties 
from the beginning. Clapp, the first 
man for M. A. C, was set back three 
yards oil a false start and this gave the | 
lead at once to Halligan the Worces- 
ter runner. At the first turn, however, 
Clapp was running at his opoonents 
heels and endeavored to pass on the 
inside but was blocked and was obliged 
to fall behind, the men running practi- 
cally in these relative positions for the 
tnree laps. Keith, the crack Worces- 
t-r runner, winner of the N. E. I. mile 
in 1911 at Springfield was the second 
man and received a lead of five yards 
from Halligan. Worcester based her 
hope of winning on Keiih and it was 
generally expected that he would walk 
away from his man. but all forgot to 
take into consideration one thing, 
namely, Caldwell. "Bone" although 
a good five yards in the rear when he 
took the tag from Clapp quickly gained 
1 Keith, was running close behind at 
end of the first lap, and on the 
;.rst bank of the second lap he neatly 
ipo-id oy on the inside in his custom- 
.:y way. From then on the race 
ms simply a game of follow the leader. 
Caldwell passed over a lead of about 
five yards to Whitney who put such a 
good race against R. I. Slocumb that 
he added two yards to the lead already 
gained and passed over seven yards to 
Tower the last man. Porter of Wor- 
cester, however died game. He 
pushed Tower hard but the latter, by 
clever head work on the banks kept 
his lead and broke the tape the 
winner by barely two feet, 

Tne time 3 min. 15 1-5 sec. 
although not so fast as two years ago 
:ompared very favorably with the other 
team records. Caldwell Is unofficially 
reported as having done his three 
Ups In 46 flat which was without 
doubt record time for the meet. The 
Boston Globe comments as follows: 
"The race between the Massachusetts 
Agricultural college and Worcester 
Tech teams was worth going miles to 
see. Halligan of Worcester had the 
pole and led Clapp by eight yards at 

(Continued on pace 2.1 



Goes Smoothly. Next Performance at 
Northampton. 

The largest house of the season j 
greeted the Dramatic society In Green- j 
field when "What Happened to Jones" 
was presented Wednesday evening. 
The performance went off without a 
"hitch" and the adventures of Jones, 
the hymn-book drummer were followed 
by the audience without a lag, from 
curtain to curtain. 

Under the able coaching of Mr. and 
Mrs. James K. Milis the cast has 
reached a high standard and is "on 
edge" to offer the best M. A. C. 
dramatic performance ever given, at 
Northampton Thursday evening. 

The cast of the prom performance 
will be: 



The Slogan College Night at Draper 
Hall. 



Ebenezer Goodly, A professor of Anatomy. 

E. F. Moore. "15 '■ 
Mrs. Goodly. Ebenezer's wife. 

F. B. Hills, '12 
Marjoric, Daughter fo El)enezcr, 

F. L. Cray, 12 
Minerva. Daughter to Ebenezer, I 

D.J Lewis. '15 
Richard Heatherly. Engaged to Marjorte, 

F. W. Read, -14 
AlvlnaStarligh. Mrs, Goodly's sister, 

H. W. Hyland. '13 
Antony Goodly, D, D , Bishop of Ballarat. 

W. S Moir, "13 

Cissy. Ebenezer's ward. S. M Jordan. * 13 

Helma. Swedish dome-tic. R. B. Glbbs. 15 

Thomas Holder. A policeman, 

I B C Whldden. 14 

William Bigbee, An inmate of the 



College night was observed by the 
student body and a large nun.ber of the 
faculty on last Friday evening. An 
unusually large number were present, 
many who do not dine at the Dining 
Hall coming in to the exercises which 
followed the supper. The first speaker 
was President Butterfleld who dwelt 
briefly on the subject "Boost Old 
Aggie" which was adopted as the 
watchword of the evening. In closing, 
he turned the meeting over to H, C. 
Walker '12, who acted as toasimaster. 
Walker and R. R, Parker '12 the 
speaker to follow him. spoke on "The 
Reorganization of the Senate." Par- 
i ker explained the condition of affairs 
which now exists In the College Sen- 
ate ; the strong points and Its limita- 
tions, and how the sweeping change 
which will soon go Into effect, will work 
to better advantage. Moreau '12 who 
followed Parker spoke on "Attiletics 
in Relation to College Life." He 
said that our showing in athletics and 
the attitude of students towards athlet- 
ics, at the college, as a whole, has 
been good. Here athletics is an 
important part of college life. Uut, 
he said that college life would be bet- 
ter if there were moie dormotorles : 
He believes that under conditions such 
as exist at Dartmouth, we too would 



f Coattawd ••> cat* 2t 



(Cen«mi«lftBPM«3) 



In Rough Hockey Game by Score of 
7-1. 

Last Saturday afternoon the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College hockey 
team defeated the Army 7-1 on the 
Reservoir rink at West Point after a 
somewhat rough and hotly contested 
game. The game was started 
promptly at 2- 15 by Lieut. Bartlett 
who acted as referee. 

Royce. who played cover for the 
Army, made the first tally of the game 
' after taking the puck practically the 
whole length of the rink, unassisted by 
his teammates. The Army started 
off pretty fast for the first three or four 
minutes of play, and during that time 
Royce got his goal, but alter that goal 
the Aggie players took a big brace and 
West Point was unable to make more 
than two or three unsuccessful attempts. 
After two minutes of hard, fast play- 
ing, and the sea-sawing of the puck up 
and down the rink. Peckhain shot our 
first goal tying the score. Soon after 
j this goal Royce was penalized two 
j minutes for tripping and the first half 
? ended, score 1-1. 

The Army started off the second- 
half by some fast playing and It looked 
as though they were "coming back" 
but It wat only an illusion. Woolley 
shot our second goal of the gaine after 
one minute of play. After this the 
game was all with the Aggie team and 
they shot the puck Into the net at will. 




Scene from "What Happened to Jones "—Northampton. Feb. 15, 



i« 



WHAT HAPPENED TO JONES 



f» 



m 



THURSDAY EVENING 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 13. 1912 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 13, 191 2, 



The following men shot the remaining 
goals in the order given: Peckham 2, 
Hutchinson 2, Sanctuary. Only once 
during the second half did the Army 
have a chance to score, and that was 
prevented by the quick and effective 
work of Ackerman. In the last half 
Royce was again penalized for two 
minutes and Rosevere for three. 

No fault or criticism is to be found 
of the Aggie skaters, each one had 
brilliant streaks when they couldn't 
have shone better. The work of Capt. 
Peckham and WooUey was especially 
good at all times. 

West Point was weak at the goal 
while Royce and Vincer excelled, both 
doing some fast skating and good block- 
ing. As a whole the game was some- 
what disappointing, the Army team 
work being very poor and unnecessarily 
rough. 

It Is hoped that this game will open 
up a chance for M. A. C. to place 
West Point on some of our other 
athletic schedules. 
The line-up : 

•*• A- C. ARMY. 

Peckham. rw Iw. Rosevere 
Woolley. Iw rw. Vincer 
Hutchinson, c c. Harris. Schneider 
Sanctuary, r r. Harmon 
Needham, cp cp. Royce 
Lh'ie. p p. Slbert. Drake 
Ackerman. g g, Calchell 
Score— M. A. C 7. Army 1. Referee- 
Lieut. Bartlett. Time— l5-minute halves. 



either to a moral disability or to an 
inability to get along with men. 

Music was furnished by the college 
quartet and orchestra. The even- 
ing's exercises closed with the singing 
of the college song. 



RELAY TEAM WINS 

(Contlnusd from paga I .J 

the end of the first relay Keith 
found a persistent adversary in Cald- 
well of Agricultural college, and the 
latter slipped into the lead on his 
second lap, giving Whitney, his relief, 
an advantage of a couple of yards 
over Slocumb, the third Worcester 
runner. The latter ran afoul of Cald- 
well at the start, but quickly got going 
and followed Wnitney all the way until 
near the end, when he spurted. The 
anchor men. Tower for Massachusetts 
and Porter for Worcester Tech put up 
a sterling race. Porter being beaten at 
the tape by less than a yard. The 
time, 3 min. 15 1-5 sec. was fast." 
The condition of the men on the 
team was probably affected somewhat 
by the troubles encountered on the trip 
down and these may account for the 
time, which although fast was not as 
good as was expected. 






UP-TO-DATE 

COLLEGE FOOTWEAR* 



Elite Shoes, 
Swell Shod Shoes, 
Pumps the fit, - 



53.50 to $5.00 

$5.00 and $6.00 

$4.00 



SHOW AT GREENFIELD 

IContlnued (rrim pag* I ] 



EXPERT REPAIRING 



PAGE'S Shoe Store, 



BETWEEN THE BANKS 



COLLEGE MIGHT 

[Continued (rom pac« I] 



develope a stronger and more un^fed 
student body in regard to college 
interests. 

Dr. J. B. Lindsey who followed 
Moreau paid a tribute to the President 
by saying that the "bigg-st booster of 
M. A. C. was Its president." Taking 
the watchword of the evening for a 
subject, he said that there are three 
ways to ••Boost Old Aggie," first 
through scholarship ; secondly through 
athletics, which he said should come 
second to scholarship alone ; and 
thirdly, through the student as a gentle- 
man. He said that the student him- 
self was the best advertisement a col- 
lege could have and that he can best 
"Boost Old Aggie."' 

Following Dr. Lindsey. J. H. Har- 
low '12 spoke briefly on "College 
Spirit" from three standpoints, in 
regard to athletics, between students 
and faculty, and in regard to the fresh- 
men. Robert Wales '12 told of the 
extension work, that students are doing 
inthe line of social service, and offered 
a few suggestions to the student body 
on ways to "Boost Old Aggie" from 
the inside. J. D. French '13 briefly 
defined the subject of the evening into 
superficial boosting and real boosting. 

The trustees were represented by 
Mr. Elmer D. Howe, who said that 
"we have struck the right note when 
we attempt to boost from the Inside." 
The failure of college graduates, he 
said, is rare, and Is generally due 



Sanatorium. H D. Allen, "13 

Henry Fuller, Superintendent of the 

Sanatorium. B C. Whidden 

Jones, Who travels for a hymn b. ok house. 

E. 1. Wilde. 12 



INTERCLASS BASKETBALL 

Two interclass basketball games 
were played In the Drill Hall on Thurs- 
day evening. One of these was the 
annual freshman-sophomore game 
which went to the freshmen by the 
margin of one point, the score being 
10-9. The game between the seniors 
and juniors was also close and exciting, 
resulting in a victory for the seniors, 
with a score of 10-9. Both the losing 
teams showed up strongest at the end 
of the game. Whatever the games 
may have been as an exhibition of 
basketball, they were close and excit- 
ing. 

In the sophomore-freshman game 
the freshmen showed considerable 
speed during the first period, scoring 9 
points to their opponents 3. But In 
the second, the sophomores came 
back strong, playing the freshmen for- 
wards to a stand-stlil and themselves 
scoring three goals from the floor. 
But the freshmen stuck pluckily to the 
game, adding one point in the second 
half which was enough to secure the 
victory, and also the coveted privilege 
of smoking on the campus. The 
senior-junior game was all in favor of 
the seniors in the first period, the score 
standing 8-4 in their favor. In the 
second half, however, the third year 
men gathered up 5 more points while 
the seniors scored but one basket. 
The game ended with the ball In the 
Seniors* territory. Here repeated trys 



HARRISON'S NURSERIES... 

Berlin, Maryland. 
Have over two thousand acres in Nursery Stock. 
They offer a book on 

HOW TO GROW AND MARKET FRUIT 

For 50 cents. 

All prospective buyers are invited to visit the 

Nursery. 

They are the largest growers of fruit trees in 

this country. 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

DURHAM - DUPLEX 
RAZDR 



MILLS, 

rHOTOGRAPHER 

The best worknian.ship. 

The latest styles, 

Reasonable prices 

Lincoln Building, Amherst, Mass. 



The Prospect House 



PERRY*8- 



The place to eat after the game. 
Attractive tables and rooms. Excel- 
lent service. Catering a specialty. 



The Razor you have 

always seen at $5.00 

^ 35 Cents Each ^ 

For this lot 



DEUEL'S 

DRUG STORE 



MRS. E. E. PERRY 

There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should bu]f 

GOAL 



or 



C. R. ELDER 



1 



I 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes. 



by the juniors at the basket were mis- 
sed only by the barest margin. 
The line- up : 

SENIORS. JUNIORS. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



j$E. N. PARISEAU,^ 

5arber j^ Shop 

RAZORS HONED 



ISO. 2 Pleasant, St.. Amherst, MaM. 



THE 



Hoover & Smith Co. 

6t6 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 

Philadelphia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 

SPEOtALISTS IN 
Fraternity Badgfes, Fobs. Novelties, 

Rings, Charms .Prizes Trophies 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, Charms.-. 



Pearson, if 
Carper.ter, Wood, rf 
Stacl<, c 
MacCarr. Ig 
Moreau, rg 



rg, Larsen 

Ig Godwin 

c, Griggs 

rf, Howe 

If, Huntington 



Score— Seniors 10. juniors 9. Basltcts 
from floor — Huntington 2. Carpenter, Mac- 
Garr Free tries— Pearson 4, Huntington 
4, Howe I. 



SOCIAL UNION ENTERTAIN- 
MENT 

The Social Union entertainment on 
Saturday evening was given by Mr. 
Arthur J. Pierce, who presented a 
number of amusing Impersonations. 

His program included the following : 
"The Courting of Dinah Shad" "My 
First Bass Solo," and "An Imita- 
tion of Robinson '12 going to Chapel." 

Mr. Pierce is a Williams man and 
was a classmate of Prof. E. M. 
Lewis. 





THE STORE 

FOR 

^U ETTE R 
CLOTHES! 



If you want to t>e 

HOI-II* WITH TIIK <iIltl.S 

you must have your clothe* |>r«n «'il nr«l clt-aneil 

AT SrSTSXN'S 



U Amity >t. 



Marooa Store 



Prt-HalDK »n<l f'lenBlnn « siHfiUliy 

Mo<i hbt-ral tlckut »y»tcni In town 



Ah I am (llrecllv connectCMl with a Whol<i««le 
MouiH*, I Clin 

8AVK YOr MONKY ON CMHIIKS 

will !)«• |ilriifif.l to show HMiOlih « «!"' >tyl«-i«of 
Wlntt-r «iiU- nixl <)vfrc«M%i8. 

II. It, W II I'll':. ItU.-V. Hunt* Blork 
('|i One KUictit 



Clothing Heavily Reduced 

There are plenty of Clothes Sales these days, l»ut there's as much diflferenc* 
between tliein and tlieir nielluMis, and what ihty r. ;tliy mean — and wliat you get lor 
your money— as there is i)etween tlie C lothts lliemselves. We are now holding our 

Semi-Annual Clearance Sale 

which means that 200 .Mm's Hi^jlt tirade .Suits ami i;o Men's Overcoats will be 

sol<l at 1-5 off from regular price 
JO Suits and Overcoats at J16 00 18 SuHs and Overcoats at I14.40 

All Suits and t)vercoats at the same (tistuunt 
It's the buying opportunity of tli<- year. Don't miss it 

SANDERSON & THOMPSON 




The Wt^nTiiv.'^Q''^'^^'-'- ^"^ '^^o'^^Rd 



I KANK II. UANFOK III. Mom, 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Mikeri 

•f 



4mhersl foriKT In KalhskrHap. spedaity 



CAP & GOWNS 

to the Aniciican Colleges from tlie At- 
lantic to the I'acific. Cla».s Contracts a 



M. B. MAORATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 

)rder»left at the Amhfriit Mou^e will nKeivr 

pron pt *tl«*ntlft, 



Toetil Micntka, 

Boot and Shoe Repairing, 

I ifxie wliile )oi( A .1 • 



A Great Big Offer ! 



A 25 cent Tooth \hu»h lor 



-^ Oei^ti 



Wn'tir^g to Her 

Tell her all about it — she won't 
be jealous if you save a comer of 
your heart for Fatima Cigarettes. 



20 for 
15 cents 



Wuh each packaffe nfr^Vmayott 
gH a pennant coup'tn, 2'J ■/ whifh 
tecurr a handtowe fell college pri- 



SATURDAY AND MONDAY, Feb. 17-19 Respectively 

ssv will -ivo you I. 25-CKNT PHAUL TOOTH BIU'SII lor 4c 
with ov'iy 25-CKNT CAN OF i'KAUL Kxnil I'OWDKlt. 

This IS our special introductory offer, made (expressly to yni ii. order 
that you will become accpiainled «ith a Tooth Powd. r that makes . lean, 
pearly white teeth does not scratch the enamel >>^<.iens th<- gums and 
.) makes them healthy. We have only a limited nund>er of th.s,. brushes. 

IJoii't Koi'l^Ot tilt* l>«ltOM 

Henry Adams & Co. 



Time 1«UX:A.I-^U »to«'0 



«»!» «li«> Cn'iicr* 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 13, 1913. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 13, 1912. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 

the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOABO OF EDITORS. 

ALDEN C. BRETT. 1912 E<l«or-ln-Chlef. 

R. H. VANZWALENBURC 13. Assistant Editor. 
JESSE CARPENTER. JR .1912 M«n«rlne Editor. 
MARSHALL C. PRATT, 1912. Competition Editor 
ROYAL N. HALLOWELL, 1912. Athletics. 

JOSEPH A. HARLOW. 1912, Athletics. 

OSCAR G. ANDERSON. 1913, Ahimnl Notes 
SILAS WILLIAMS. 1917. Deperlment Notes. 

S. MILLER JORDAN 1913. College Notes. 



BUSINESS DEPABTMERT. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912, Business Manager. 

GEORGE ZABRISKIE. 1913 Asat. Bus. Manager 
ERNEST S. CI ARK. JR 1914. Circulation. 

CHESTER E. WHEELER. 1914 Clrrulatioa. 

STUART B. FOSTER. 1914. C'rcuUtlon. 



SubMription $1 SO per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Albert W. Dodge. 

Cirtared as seeood-clsaa nutter st the Annhem 

omn. 



Vol. XXII. TUESDAY. FEB. 13. No. 17 
don't FORGET 

The hockey games on Wednesday 
and Friday. 

To ask the girl to the Informal on 
Washington's birthday. 

That the Junior Prom Committee 
Is at the Drill Hall to work and not to 
receive visitors or answer questions. 

That Feb. 22 is only a half holiday. 

That the eligibility rule is stiii in 
force and that now Is the time to "get 
busy" to avoid future trouble. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

(Nottcee tor this »>luinn stiould be dropped In the 
SioHAL Office or handed toR. H. VanZwalenburc 
' 1 3. oa or before the Saturday preceding each iasue.] 

Feb. 13. 6-45 p. m. — Stockbridge 
Club, Room G, South College. 

6-45 p. M. — Landscape Art 
Club, Wilder Hall. 

Feb. 14, 1-30 p. M. — Assemby, Miss 
Ida M. Tarbell, New York City. 

3-00 p. M. — Hockey, Am- 
herst at Pratt Rink. 

3-00 p. M.— Forester Rane 
in Chapel. 

Feb. 15. 8-15 p. M.— Dramatics in 
Northampton. 

Feb. 16,3-00 p. m.— Hockey. h/I. I. 
T. at Pratt Rink. 

8-00 p. m. — 1913 Junior 
Prom. 

Feb. 17. 8-00 p. m.— ••The Day Af- 
ter." 
Feb. 18, 9-15 a. m.— Chapel, Dr. 
Herbert J. White of Hartford. 



COLLEGE NOTES 

Dr. Albert P. Fitch of Cambridge 
addressed the students at Sunday 
chapel. 

The freshmen have ordered their 
class hats; they are white with a 
brown band. 

Blessed be the Prom for by It shall 
many rooms be cleaned, floors painted 
and windows washed. 

Owing to a badly injured foot 
"Det" Jones was unable to play In 
the West Point game. 



Birdsall & Allen's "Owl Wagon'" 
is doing a thriving business with those 
who retire late and arise later. 

Prof. L. B. Allen of the State 
Normal School at Westfield, lectured 
on ''Pure Food" In Clark Hall. Wed- 
nesday night. 

Frank R. Rane. state forester, will 
deliver an illustrated lecture on Massa- 
chusetts forestry, Wednesday evening 
in Clark Hall. 

A wax-tread will be held in the Drill 
Hall. Wednesday night to get the floor 
in proper condition for the Junior 
Prom. The college orchestra will 
supply the music. Everybody out! 

1915 showed enough class in the 
basketball game to win the right to 
smoke on the campus. We would 
like to see a little more of the same 
class displayed in track, baseball and 
tennis. 

The Greenfield performance of 
"What Happened to Jones" was one 
of the most successful of the season. 
Dress rehearsal with the orchestra 
was held In the academy this after- 
noon in preparation for Thursday's 
presentation. 

New developments In the race for 
first place in the Signal's "Unpopu- 
lar Corner" show that the watch dog 
of the treasury is rapidly forging to the 
front — owing no doubt to the painful 
ceremony called registering for the 
second semester. 

Saturday was rather an unlucky day. 
The only things worthy of note were 
that the hockey team took the meas- 
ure of Worcester Tech at the B. A. 
A. meet and the rifle team shot a 
score of 950 against New Hampshire 
state whose scores have ranged 
around 825. 

At the sophomore class meeting 
held Wednesday afternoon the follow- 
ing officers were elected for the sec- 
ond semester: President, W. S. 
Baker; vice-president, J. P. Palmer; 
secretary, D. W. Jones: treasurer, 
P. Sherman ; class captain. W. L. 
Kilbourne; sergeant-at-arms, U. R. 
Hyde. 



RIFLE LEAGUE RESULTS 

M. A. C. STATE TIED WITH PRINCETON 

Results from Washington show that 
M. A. C. is still tied with Princeton 
for first place in the Eastern League. 
Six victories and no defeats is the 
record of each team. Edminister was 
high man in the last match with a 
score of 192. 

The result : 

M. A. C. 942 

West Virginia, 895 

North Georgia Agric. Col. 921 
Harvard, 915 

Princeton, 915 

Pennsylvania. 891 

Louisiana State, 891 

V. S. College Vet. Sur. 811 

Norwich, 842 

Delaware Agricultural Col. 826 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
mav be found at 



EWELL'5 



PARKS. 

FLORIST, 

Flowers for all occcasions. 

Mail or telephone orders given 
prompt attention. 

239 Main St., Northampton 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 



AND 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 




It's a good thing not to worry about 
your pedal apparel, its correct, style 
comfort or durability. 

Buy your shoes from 

Tim Shop Ms lUe Slile 

" Walk Over, " Haywood Shoe^, 

13-50, $4.00, I5.00 



Bolles " Special, " Stetson Shoes, 

I5.00 to 18.00 

RKPAIRING DEPARTMENT 

E.M. BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Next to Corner Drug Store. 



Angier, '13. 



Clark, '13 



We have a full line of Banners, Post 
Cards, College .Songs, Seal Papers, Foun 
tain Pens, Candy, Tonic and .Student 
.Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

BASKMENT OK NO. COLLEGE 



Eldridge, '14. 



Tarbell, '14. 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Block 
Amherst, Mau. 



C^rp^n'ter & Morehouse, 

PRINTET 



No I, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



H. E. KINSMAN, 

College PbotograpDer 

NASH BLOCK, MAIN ST., 
AMHERST, :: MASS. 



High-grade artistic work. Perfect satisfaction guaranteed. 

Studio newly equipped with large sky light 

and special lense for large 

groups. 

All styles the latest. Fine picture framing. 



Maryland Agric. Col. 824 

New Hampshire, 824 

Tuesday the Rifle team shot against ' 
West Virginia. The score of 942 , 
which was made is very creditable, j 
and will, undoubtedly, give us the 
match. The team is still tied with 
Princeton for first place in the Eastern 
Rifie League. It comparative scores 
itand for apyihing. we should be able 
to take that n.atcn easily be:aus- 
Princeion's hig'-e^t score, lo-aatc. 
does not exceed our lowest score of 
931. 

The results of the match against 
West Virginia are as fol'ow^: 

Standing. Prone. Tct»i . 

Edminister. 94 98 192 
Wnitmore, 91 100 191 

McDcugal. 89 99 188 
Wilde, 86 100 186 

Clark, 90 95 185 

The rifie team shot Its se^cnd 
match of the week Saturday, New 
Hampshire Collrge being the oppon- 
ent. The total score was 948, witn 
a possibility of a few points being 
added. 

The score follows: — 

Slaniing. Prone. Toul. 

Llovd, 94 99 193 

Eamlnstrr, 93 97 190 

Raymond. 93 96 189 

Wilde. 89 99 188 

MacDougal, 88 100 188 



Totals, 
Average 



457 491 



948 
189.6 



LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE 
VISITS COLLEGE 

The State iegisiative committee 
on agriculture visited tnc college on 
Thursday a;id Friday. According to 
the annual custom, the committee 
appeared before the students at 
chapel. 

Several speakers from the commit- 
tee were introduced by President 
Butterfield. Among them was Mr. 
Ames, the chairman of the Committee 
on Agriculture, who spoke briedy on 
the changes for the beUer which he 
had noted in M. A. C. in recent 
years; also of the character of agri- 
cultural education which Is being given 
the students here. Other sp-akers 
who dwelt on certain phases cf the 
relations of the committee to the col- 
lege were Mr. Sargent of Belchertown 
and Mr. McKay of Revere. Mr. 
Gleason, vice-president of the Board 
of Trustees, gave a brief talk. 



ELIGIBILITY RULES 

February 10. 1912. 
Outline of eligibility rule, together 
with interpretation of the same rules 
for enforcement for the present sem- 
ester. 

1. The Rule: If a student's 
grade falls below 60^ in any subject at 
any time during the semester, he shall 

: not represent the college publicly as a 
member of any collegiate body or or- 
ganization. The present collegiate 
bodies under this rule are : 

Football Tennis j 

Baseball Signal 

HocKey Orchestra 

IxAck Glee. Mandolin, and ^ 

Banjo Clubs. I 

This rule shall apply to all members | 
of organiziticns. including managers, j 
assistant managers, leaders. and others, j 

The above ruie Is in lieu of Para- i 
graph I of Section 2 In the student's j 
copy of the book of rules. Paragraph ^ 
2 of the same Section is still in force ' 
as printed. | 

2. The Student's Grade: Aj 
student's graoe as reportei by his 
Instructor snail b- his averag<f semes- 
ter ranK in the saoject up to the lim? 
the report Is inade. 

3. Anouncemknt; The announce- 
ment of a student's standing as H ef- 
fects his relation to student activities 
shall be made from the Dean's office 
on the dates announced below. 

4. Release: The reiease of a 
student from the application of the 
eligibilliy rule shall come from the 
Dean's oifice The status of a stu- 
dent as announced at any date shall 
remain as his status until the next 
date for announcement of rank; even 
if a student should succeed In raising 
his rank between announcement per- 
iods. It cannot affect his relation to 
the eligibility rule. 

5. The Schedule of Reports : 



SOIL ROBBERY 

" Uncle Henry" Wallace, who presided over the great Conservation 
Congress at Kansas City last .Septt-mher. said that as a nation we had 
been "soil miner.s," mining and .selling the surplus of availahle fertility 
which had been stored up for a^es. hut that now we weie "soil lolbeis " 
The surplus of available fertility of enormous tiarlsof tillage land has 
been mined on an extensive st ale. so tliat in many sections the prtuluct 
of the land h.is been reduced to the 'natural yield." that is. a yield based 
on the amount of plant food rendered available fti'm v« ar to >cai. which 
in turn is measured by the weakest link in the chain of fertility It can 
not be foretold in what hour or in v>hat year the weakt st link will be dis- 
closed, but it is there and it may mean great lo.ss , ,. , 

To preach dependence on potential s<.il fertility or the weaktst link 
is not only poor economy and h.tti ftfii<s, but it is unscientific, in that it 
will lead to crop bankruptcy and commercial loss Katlu 1 preaih in the 
growing of any crop, restoration of the plant food which it has removed, 
not only as itof> insuram,\ l>ul to maintain the integrity of the soil 
I'rof. Sii>ckbridge taught: •, • , 

" If the soil machine is a good one so much the better: if H has a 
balance of crop producing power to its credit, let us preserve that lialance 
for an emergency l.et us not draw on it for present needs." 

"STUDY THE PUNT FOOD PROBIEW 



% 



60WKER 



Fertilizer Company 

43 Chatham St. Boston 



F. A. SHERARD 

MEN'S STORE 



Kuppcntieimefs 
Fine Clothes 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



(a") The notices of dellnquen.ty 
or reinstatement shall be mailed by 
the Dean to students affected, on the 
••Dean's Saturday," and shall be ef- 
fective the Monday noon following. 

(d) The following is the sched- 
ule of the "Dean's Saturdays." on 
which announcements concerning 
eligibility rank shall b-; made to all 
students; — 

March 2, 

March 30, 

May 4, 

June 1. 



WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY 

Wednesday assembly was a mass 
meeting at which President Butterfield 
spoKe about the new eligibility rule. ^ 
He told how it had come about and \ 
that It was thought to be the best' 
solution of the eligibility problem. ! 
He said that there was no eligibility 
rule but what would effect somebody 
some time and that the men must not 
think that when they are out for a 
team, they are exempt from all rulings 
In regard to scholarship. 



Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOM TAIlORIHG « SPECIIilTy 

Thom IIkmenwav. 'la, M. A. C. Representative 




PETITION FAILS 

The petition for entrance into the 
New England Intercollegiate Athletic 
Association, which was presented by 
M. A. C. Saturday, was out under 
advisement for a year. The annual 
N. E. I. A. A. meet will be held in 
Springfield this year. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES. 

EXTENSION. 

The Extension Service announces 
a course of lectures upon the different 
phases of fruit culture In connection 
with the apple-packing school which is 
to be held Feb. 12-24 inclusive. 
This Is the first apple-packirg school 
which has ever been held in New 
England and it Is attracting consider- 
able attention. Fruit growers from 
other states as well as from Massachu- 
setts have enrolled in their course. 

The students in the school will do 
the actual work of grading and packing 
the apples into boxes and barrels, 
until they are familiar with the differ- 
ent packs used on the market. In 
addition to the practical work the ex- 
tension department will conduct a 
series of lectures In the senior labora- 
tory of Wilder Hall. 



YOU WILL FIND 
A FULL LINE 
OF 



DUDLEY 



oUiKirrFi* IN 




Fine Athletic Goods 

FOR EVERY SPORT 



TOBACCO 



AT- 



The College Drug Store 




•The 5tST In Tnc Worlo' 
Write for < ataloge. 



Charles H. Didley 

HANOVKR, • - N. H. 

Agent, HAZEN *14 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 13, 1913. 



f-!^'i^x'><^K\^CS,'%')ex'>C)C>C>C':^^ •.•.-.•.• . V>f**j6a!f>f5»6f' • ' 




COODS FOR Ml-N. 



C. & K. Derbys, 
Keiser Cravats, 

-^ English and Scotch Woolens. 

TH£ BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 



AMHERST. 



DARTMOUTH. 



<r>iV^6«^i<f>Swft«;^<^x^>ft(e^^^ 



Highest Grade Roses 

W'e are offering to our local patrons, seieciion from our l.irgt' 
stock of finest Roses, es|x;cially grown for the Nkw Yokk and I!«>m<>n 
Fldwkr Markets. 

THE MONTGOMERY CO., Inc., 

HADLEIY, MASS. 

TELEPHONES, 

AmherBt, 196-R. 
Northampton. bt>0. 



GENUDIE ■ TH]«lftS - PHOSPHAFE - POWDEl^ 

Basic Slag Meal 

Orows Big Red Apples and Other Fruits 

TROPHIES WON BY USERS OF 

Genuine - Thomas - Phosphate - Powder 

— AT TH^ 

GREAT NEW ENGLAND FRUIT SHOW 
Held at Boston. Mass., October aj-aS, 191 1 

International Apple Shippers' Association's Cup loi H. >t t "..riiineicwl Ex- 

hihit of I'.ifked liiiU Wiin l.\ < iniycrs F.ir m. ( i A I>r. w, M(»r , ( onn. 
Silver Cup for Best Display of Baldwin Apples offered liv Ihivrrnot 

F()s>. of M.iss.u lut-ftis. Won l>y I K v\ >iiN(,f. Rhoiir Isl.ii.ri 
Silver Shield for Best Hxhibit of Rhode Island (IreeninKs «.ffered hy 

(.oveinor Pothirr, (>f Ixiioile I>l:ini! W.in hy I K \S'i»>«.r. Rhndr I.oI.iihI 
$25.00 Cash for Best Barrel of Klnjc Apples nfferrd l.v W . & f. DourLis 

Company, of Connecticut. W.m by IJij ih Koners, < onnectii nt 
First Prize for Best Barrel of Rhode Island (Jreenlnss. \V .ti i,v I 'j .h 

Rogers, ( oniifcticiit. 

First Prize $50.(M) Best 5 Boxes of Apples. An\ N ariety or \arieties. 

Won liy Louver's h.irm, ' '. . A l>riw, M.ui.i^tT. t Oi.m, ti. m 

Second Prize $25.00 for Best 5 Boxes of Apples. Any Variety or 
Varieties. Won by .\. S W iiisor. Ktiode IsI.ukI 

First Prize-Best Box Exhibit of Apples. Won bv < ..uvLr.-. I ,Hriii.(. ,\ 
I)rew, M.ujagiT, Connect'! iit 

Silver rtedal— Best Packed Rxhibit of Apples. Won by Conyer's Farm. 

('•. A Drew. Manager. ( 'onnft ticnt. 

First Prize Best Box of Rhode Island (ireenin^s. Won by 1°. K. 

W'insor, Rhode Island 

Sweepstakes for Best Box of Apples Packed for Market $75.00. Won 

by ("onyer's Kami, (i A. I)f('\v. Mapiatiei, (. onnrciui t 

Berlin Prize $25.00 Cash and Silver Medal. \\ .,n bs C^.Ilvtr^ 1 .irm, 
<"i A. Drew. Manajjer. Connect'cut. 

Connecticut PomolojElcal Society Silver Medal for Best Table of Fruit. 

Won by (onver's l-.aini. (1. A I)re\v. (ieiieial .Matia;.fr. ( onncitieiil 
Massachusetts Agricultural College Sweepstakes for Winning Largest 
Number of Prizes. Won by Conyer's Farm, (i. A. Drew, Manajrer. ( onn. 

Nuniermis Other I'li/f^. \V..ti bv ahoVf and oilier u«ers (ienuine Tlniinns Plios) lutf !',,«. in 

Why Not Put YOUR Fruit in the Prize Winning Class by Purchasing 

GENUINE THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

Key-Tree Branii From 

THE COE - MORTIMER COMPANY 

51 Chambers Street, New York City 

I tiir Booklet, "l l' t" Datf l-ruit fJiouiri; with riuipiiai* Piu.spli.ifi- l'.,\\.l..| ■' 

m»citii)n I hr- College Mriw! 



ALUMNI NOTES 

; The annual dinner of the Massa- 
.•^^^j,^j,^K^^y;;,^y^ichusetts Agricultural Colltge Club of 
I Washington will be held at the Arling- 
ton hotel, Vermont Avenue and H 
Street, Washington. D. C , Saturday, 
Feb. 17th, at 6 P M. Professor Has- 
j brouck will be present 

'79. S. P. Green, late professor 
j of Horticulture and Forestry at the 
' Ur Iversity of Minnesota is the subject 
ol memorials published in the Decem- 
ber number of the Minnesota Horticul- 
turist published by the state horticul- 
tural society. The following quota- 
tions are fiom a memorial written by 
Prof. Harry Snyder, for 20 years 
associated with Green on the faculty of 
the University of Minnesota: 

"When, in 1888. Congress passed 
ihs act establishing an exoeriment 
station In each state, there were but 
few men who were properly equipped 
educationally along practical lines to 
enter upon experiment station work. 
Professor Green was one of the few 
loniculturists who was fully prepared 
-.! the time to enttr this new firld, and 
Min; esota was fortunate in securing 
his services. " 

*'His work in forest conservation 
antedates the movement of the gen- 
-ra! government along thli line. Pro- 
fessor Green's reputation in forestry 
s internaiionai, ard hisappciitmrnt ss 
Dean of the S:h,ol of Forestry as an 
.lh,ror that h- h^d will cariied ana 
I : ricniy aesetvet. " 

"Potrssor Green had comprehen- 
sive plans for the prorrouon of the 
horticultural and f.;restry work of the 
:>ta!e. If was his amcition to make 
the recent erected Forestry Schcol 
with the Itasca Pe.rk Reservation, at 
ine head waters of tne Mississippi, 
not only of great practical vslus to the 
state but tf Uittulness to the entire 
coui.tty. He was planning to revisit 
the best European forest schools. In 
norticuliure he had extensive plans 
manguratea for tti • improvement cf 
fruit and gard- n cops. It is to be 
hcp-a that, as fjr posilbie, these pians 
Will be carried through, but as no cne 
c^rry tnem Out as well as Professor 
Gre-en, his deatn is an irreparable loss 
to the state." 

'94.-- -Prof. R. E. Smith, of the 
University cf Ca'iiornia and Miss E. 
H. Smith (M.Sc, M. A. C. 1904) 
assistant plant pathologist, are authors 
of Bulletin 218 of tne California Exper- 
iment station Tfiis bulletin, entitled 
"California Piant Diseases" comprises 
nearly 160 capes arid is illustrated by 
102 exeilent hal' tone photographs. 
A tbcugh issued as an experiment 
s!,iiion buli^tir, this oublication Is In 
reality a comprehensive text b:.ok of 
plant pstti; Icgy for tne western part of 
the Ur,ittd States. 

'95. — George A. Billings is senior 
author of F^rmei's' Bjlbtm No. 472 
of the U. S. Department of Agricul- 
ture entitled "Systems of Farming in 
Central New Jersey." 

'95. — A. F. Burgess, expert in 



I 



lit f 1 f p 1 1 \ . 



and am interested in NEW ENGLANI) 
A(;KICULTURE and have devoted a 
Special Department of my business \u 
the handling of FARMS and COl'N 
TRY HOMES with F. P. MARSTON, 
N. M '81, as .Vlanajjer. Correspondence 
solicited. Send for RAV.MOND'S RED 
LETTER, Farm and Country Home 
Edition. Reliable agents wanted. 

T. H. RAYMOND 

Central .Square, Cambridge, Mass. 



E.B DICKINSON D. S. 

Williams Bi^ock, .Amhekst, Mass. 

< iKFii I 1 loi'Rs: 



FOR FARMS ! 

Big, Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Hollies or Building l^ts 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W R BROWN 

Savings Hank lil'k, 

Amherst. Mass 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 





LAUNDRY 




Shirts. 


. 


10 15c 


Collais, 


. 


It 


Cuffs. - 


. 


i« 


Plain wash. 


- 


40c per «l(v 


.Same, rough 


dry. 


251- prr do/ 



Ralph R Parker, agtnl, C. .S. C. House. 

S5 Pleasant St. 

Francis S. MadLson, agent for 1015 and 

sliort ciiurse, XVt I.al) 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Fred .S. Merrill, agent, C .S. C. House 

85 I'h-as Hit St 

Put full name and address on laundr> 



THIS CATAL06UE 
SHOULD BE 
IN THE HANDS 
OF EVERY ONE 
INTERESTED IN 

ATHLETIC SPORT 

.MmII<-iI Krr« 1 




Kxpe'ienced uwrs 
nUrcp th.it \\ right : 
& Dit^oii articles 
.ire sufwriur. Thev 
are desiRned and , 
ni;ide l)\ men who 
aieexprrt^and who I 
know iiowlo inethe 1 
Kouds then)<i«lves 



Complete Equipment for Law* 
Tennis, Base Ball, Golf, Cricket, 
Track and Field Sports, Basket 
Ball, Foot Bail and Lawn (iame* 



Wright & l)it.son 
I. awn I ennis (iuide 
10 Cents 



Wright & l>itson 
Bane Ball (>uide 
10 Cent* 



To ^are time addrets our near <■ si tlore 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

3-44 Washington 5t., Boston, Hast. | 

NEW YORK CHICAOO 

J2 Warren .^t. 119 N. \Vaba^h Ave. 

SAN HRANCISCO 

359 Market .'>t. 

PROVIDENCB, R. \. CAMBRIIK]R. MASS. 

76 Weybosset St. Harvard Square 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 13, 1912. 



T^ 



Vr/ ' 



un^tkjf^i^f^ij^i 




^ .NT.HOLYOiTC 



HALLIY 



lOLYfiK 



Ceno. Valley SI. Ry. Lines 

FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
m.tterial and we have excellent roses, 
.irnations,vtolets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
\our orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

3J Main St., Masonic BIdg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from 1 A. M. to 4 A. M. 



charge of Breeding Experiments, 
Bureau of Entomology U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture is author of an 
illustrated bulletin (No. 101, Bureau 
of Entomology) entitled "Calosonia 
Sycophanta, its life history, behavior 
and successful colonization in New 
England." In transmitting the report 
to the secretary of Agriculture Dr. 
Howard, chief of the Bureau, says: 
" This insect is one of the most import- 
ant of the natural enemies of the 
gypsy moth and the brown tail moth 
which have been imported from 
Europe. The work on it has been in 
Mr. Burgess' charge. He is partic- 
ularly sldlled in this class of work and i 
has achieved a notable success in the 
investigation. " 

'99. — Captain William H. Arm- 
strong of the U. S. Infantry, stationed 
in Porto RiCo was a recent visitor at 
the college. Captain Armstrong is on 
a four morths leav^ of absence, and 
was married Jan. 26th to Miss Mabel 
HlUabold of Chicago. They will be 
at home after April !5th at El Morro, 
San Juan, Porto Rico. Mr. Arm- 
strong as an undergraduate was the 
instructor in drawing and developed 
that work to a remarkable degree dur- 
ing the years he taught it. 

'08. — The class has started a Class 
Gift Fund, with the idea of making a 
special presentation to the college at 
the five year reunion. If any mem- 
bers did not receive notice of the 
same, will they kindly notify the treas- 
urer, Roland H. Verbeck. Kezar Falls, 
Me. 

I '08.— R. H. Verbeck and T. A. 
! Barry had a short and unexpected ; 
reunion recently in front of the Union , 
j Station. Portland, Me. Barry is on 
! the road for the General Electric 
company, traveling from the Boston 
'office. 

I '08.— Orton L. Clark, Strassburg 
'university,, Alsace- Lorrain, Germany, 
\ has been allowed to start on his Doc- 
tor's Arbeit after a few months' work 
there. As a rule a student is fortu- 
nate if a theme is assigned to him 
after two or three semesters' work. 
Mr. Clark has previously studied at 
Rostock and Munich, and is just com- 
pleting two years' study abroad. 

'08. — F. L. Edwards is spending 
the winter at Bucksport, Me., where 
he is teaching Agriculture at the East- 
ern Maine Conference seminary. He 
is also coaching the athletic teams, 
but reports that this position is but a 
temporary diversion from his farm at 
RocKland. 

'08. — J. R. Paricer, assistant ento- 
mologist of the Montana Experiment 
station is author of a nine page report 
(Bulletin 86 Montana Experiment Sta- 
tion) entitled ••The Use of Soap to 
Retard the Settling of Certain Arsenlc- 
;als." Mr. Parker's experiments 
! demonstrated that soap is very useful 
in holding arsenate of lead and arse- 
nate of zinc in suspension. This is an 
Important point in connection with 
spraying for the codling moth. 




AlltK 



forts- 



e com! 

When pood ftHows gel toprlher — 
then Vflvet is supreme This su- 
perb leaf has hung in the warehouse 
over two year* -a tremendous 
'hang^ — all harshness is nullified — 

he leaf groves rich remarkably 

m'>ol!i — and in the pipe. Ye gods ! 
..hat a smok'-! lis too smooth to 
uit —toomellow to be anything but 

he best smoke on earth. TlK>t*-.why 

t's calit d 

cvelation. 



THE 
SMOOTHEST 

TObACCO 



V'el^et. One tin a a 
At all deal 



ealers. 



L?AL'LDING A MERRICK 

CHICAGO 





One ounce 
bags» 5 cent:. 

Convenient 

for cigarette 

amokers 



la 



Full Two 
Ounce Titfis 



WE SOLICIT YOIJR PATRONAGE 

In ><) tar an our Ix^nefits arc mutual. 

THE AMHERST CAS COMPANY 

Everything Ellectrical 



Scbool and Colkse Pboiograpbcrs . . . 



L3I0 



LOO ALLY: 5* Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadley, Mass. 

These Studio-s offer the l>eM skilled 
Hrlists and most complete 

equipment ol>tainal>le 




Main Ofpick: 

1546-1548 Uroadway, 



New York City 



ST K.AM \ \ I I ISO, Telephone $»-4. 

M.D.UII.MAN. C. A.MOrrKT. GAS FITTING. TINNING 

TFXEF»HONE 1079-3. 



GILMAN and M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 

CONFECTIONERY. 

207 tu 211 Maih Strkbt. 

WoRCESiKR, Mass. 



CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PLUMBERS. 



.Specialty of Kepairinu 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lf.ai) Lights, &c. 
C Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MASS 







The College Signal, Tuesday, February 13, 1912. 



m. J. Laporlii, Inc. 



Proprietors of 



IIOrO-LIVEBY-IIOBSE 

Rear Draper Hotel 
Northamj)ton. 

Tel. 183. 




ASK YOUR 

STATIONER 

FOR 



Ward's Fountain I'ens. Fine Papers 
and Knvelopes, Students" Supplies. 
Send for samples of I'ngraved Invita- 
tions, Class and Fraternity Paper, 
Kanquet Menus, Visiting Cards, etc. 



SAMUEL WARD CO. 



WflBD'S 



'0 5763 Franklin Street 
BOSTON 



All Styles 0/ 



SWEATERS 
AND JERSEYS 






TRADE m ^^H ■■> MAPK 



•^ 



Compute Line of 



Athletic Goods 
and BANNERS 



17 South College 



If you are getting the 

THE MOST FOR YOUR MONET 

then you are eating at the 

O. K., NEXT TO POST OFFICE 

J. W. KOl'.HK, Prop. 

Have you tried our zj-cent Dinners? 
If not, why not ? 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 

Custom Work 

Holland's Block, Phoenix Row 



H 



Massachusetts Agricultural M%n 



Trains men for attractive positions in vocations 
that are not overcrowded. 

Tuition is free to residents of Massachusetts. 

Necessary expenses are moderate. 

A CATALOG WILL BE SENT ON REQUEST 



KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Thirteen Index, 

N neieen Hundred Fourteen Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club. 

Dramatic Society. 

Debating Society. 

Public Speaking Courtcll, 



H. C. Walker, President 

Geo. H. Chapinan, Secretary 

W. J. Covin, Manager 

R. J. Borden, Manager 

R. T. Beers, Manager 

H H. Wood, Manager 

S. M. Jordan, Manager 

O. G. Anderson. Manager 

E. S. Clark, Manager 

F. S. Madison, President 

L. S. Calawell. President 

J. D. French, Manager 

W. J. Weaver. President 

G. W. Elis, Secretary 

Geo. Zabriskie, Manager 

J. M. Heald. Prrsidenl 

T. J. Moreau, President 



IP hen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



PROMINENCE 

Is given here to the fact that we take 

special care in the posing of 

subjects in order to bring 

out all the good 

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THE COLLEGE 




Vol. XXII. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, February 20, 1912. 



No. 18 



PROM SHOW 

An Unqualified Success Before Large 
Audience. 



SECOND PLACE IN RELAY PROM IN ITALIAN GARDEN TWO HOCKEY VICTORIES 



The annual dramatic production is 
always one of the big features of Prom 
weelc, and this year proved no excep- 
tion. A large and interested audience 
composed of the greater part of the 
college and representatives of the dra- 
matic societies of Smith, Mt. Holyoke 
and Amherst colleges filled the North- 
ampton Academy of Music to the 
doors Thursday evening. The play 
selected for presentation this year was 
Broadhurst's "What Happened to 
Jones," and a long season was but a 
grooming for the successful perform- 
ance at Northampton. 

Too much credit cannot be given 
Mr. and Mrs. James K. Mills, who 
coached the cast, for the smoothness 
with which the play was presented. 
Te their careful coaching, together 
with Manager George Zabrlskie's tire- 
less efforts is due the success of the 
dramatic season just past. 

The characters in the play were 
played well, and in some cases there 
was evidence of much thought in the 
Interpretation of the roles. It might 
be unfair to characterize any one 
player as the "star," but for the abil- 
ity and vivacity with which a very 
difficult part was carried, especial 
mention should be made of the work 
of Wilde '12 in the title role of Jones. 
His handling of his lines throughout 
the evening was excellent and as a 
piece of amateur acting his work was 
really remarkable. Hills '12, as the 
strong minded wife who "knows how 
to take care of her husband," the un- 
fortunate Professor Goodly, was very 
good. Gray '12. Jordan '13 and 
Lewis '15 did fine woric wfih the roles 
of young ladies, which are usually the 
stumbling-blocks in college produc- 
tions. Jordan, especially, made a 
"girl" that was almost attractive from 
the masculine point of visw. Moir 
'13 made a very acceptable clergy- 
man as the Bishop of Ballarat, a role 
which, while not very important, was 
by no means easy. One of the most 
difficult parts was that of Alvina Star- 
light the spinster enamoured of the 
bishop. Hyland '13 took the part 
remarkably well, and his acting in the 
old maid's hysterical spasms would 
have bordered somewhat on the emo- 
tional had the situations been less 
comical. Read '14, as young Heath- 
erly, engaged to Marjorle, looked the 
part of the worldly swain and acted it 
very well. Moore '15 fitted the part 
of the henpecked Professor Goodly as 
if it had been written for him, and did 

(CoatlmMd OB par* 2j 



In Field of Seven Teams. Fordtiam 
Wins in 3.33 3-5. 

The relay team showed their usual 
class at the Columbia Meet, Saturday, ] 
Feb. 17, at New York by winning 
second place over the mile relay dis- 
tance in the fast time of 3.33 3-5. 
This betters the time of the crack 
1910 relay aggregation by several 
seconds. The first M. A. C. entry 
was Capt. Clapp In the 60-yard handi- 
cap dash. The fiela proved too faat 
for him, however, and he failed to 
place. 

Clark 1913 also failed to place in 
in the 600-yard handicap novice, fin- 
ishing fourth in his heat which was run 
in the fastest time of the evening. 
He ran a heady race throughout, and 
II officials had been there for disquali- 
fying purposes he would have finished 
third. 

In the mile relay Massachusetts was 
lined up against Amherst. C. C. N. 
Y., Fordham, Hamilton. Wesleyan 
and Swarthmore. Capt. Clapp drew 
seventh choice and was placed on the 
outside of the track. Fordnam drew 
second and Amherst fifth. 

At the pistol Clapp jumped into 
I fourth place with Fordham leading and 
Amherst running third. These posi- 
tions remained unchanged, while the 
Fordham man gradually drew away 
from the rest. 

Caldwell took up the race with the 
Fordham twenty-five yards to the good 
and Amherst leading by five yards. 
On the first lap Amherst and Wesleyan 
dropped back, and on the secona Ford- 
ham was passed. 

Whitney, on third relay, took up the 
race with a lead of eight yards, which 
he leld throughout the two and one half 
laps. In passing the baton to Tower 
he managed to slow the other runners 
by a few yards and Dan shot into the 
lead with a good fifteen yards to spare. 
The first lap brought the crowd to their 
feet. Dan proved unequal to the task, 
however, and the anchor man of the 
Fordham team passed him on the 
second lap, leaving him to fight it out 
with Amherst. Here some pretty 
head work was shown a d Aggie came 
across in second place, two feet ahead 
of Amherst. Fordham finished in 
3 33 1-5. Aggie In 3.35. 

The team work was perfect, the 
turns being negotiated with a smooth- 
ness excelled by none of the other 
teams. In all the tags the team 
showed the coaching of Dickinson. 
' It Is evident that the team Is receiving 
instruction over the relay distance that 
compares most favorably with that of 

IConHnxiad on pae« 2.1 



Brilliant Social Event Attended by 65 
Couples. 



The annual junior "prom" of the 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 
was held Thursday evening at the drill 
hall. It was by far the most brilliant 
social affair ever held at the college. 
The great hall was wonderfully deco- 
rated, the music was bright and cheer- 
ful, and everyone enjoyed It to the 
utmost. The class of 1913 came to 
the front In the originality of the 
scheme for decoration. The hall was 
transformed into a large pergoda. 
Eight huge columns supported the two 
long beams, which In turn supported 
some 25 crosspleces. The whole 
effect was produced by a careful 
manipulation of a few wires and thous- 
ands of yards of crepe paper of the 
purest white. Within the beams thus 
produced 200 electric bulbs of different 
colors were placed, the red, green, 
t5lue and yellow effects being produced 
singly by means of switches. 

The color scheme was green and 
white. The walls were covered with 
white crepe paper and banked with 
columns of laurel. Young cedar trees 
of different sizes gavi the whole an out- 
door appearance. A low white fence 
with numerous entrances set off the 
dance floor from the surrounding 
space. Up above three large arc 
lights draped in blue gave the appear- 
ance of a far distant sky. Smilax and 
other creeping plants twined around 
the pillars and up across the beams. 
At one side of the hail was a miniature 
platform resembling the piazza of a 
summer house. Here the orchestra i 
was stationed behind a huge bank of 
potted plants and palms. The cozy 
corners were as popular as ever and 
were located at both ends of the hall 
and separated from the rest by hedges 
of cedar and hemlock. The front of 
the balcony was a mass of laurel. In 
the center under a canopy of hemlock, 
"1913" blazed out in maroon and 
white lights. One glance was almost 
enough to convince one that spring had 
really come. 

Sixty-five couples were present and 
enjoyed the dancing. The many 
beautifully tinted dresses of the young 
women served to emphasize the idea 
of spring. The juniors were In their 
element, for the "prom" comes but 
; once in a lifetime. The first couples 
began to arrive about 8-30. The con- 
cert by the orchestra continued until 
9 o'clock, during which time Presi- 
dent Benjamin W. Ellis of the junior 
class and patronesses received the 
guests. The dancers rested at mid- 

[Continued oa pac* 2] 



Amherst Defeated 3-0, and M. L T. 4-1 

in Burlesque Game. 

The annual hockey game with 
Amherst brought, as was generally 
expected, a victory for M. A. C. 
though not by as large a score as was 
anticipated. The score was 3 0. 
The work of the team was somewhat 
disappointing, even to the players 
themselves, as they failed to show 
their usual "pep" and teamwork. 

The puck was in Amherst's half of 
the rink throughout most of the game 
and Kimball, the goal tender was 
about the busiest man on either team. 
He stopped a number of shots at close 
quarters and saved the Purple from a 
more serious defeat. Wooley worked 
three difficult shots to advantage, scor- 
ing all three goals for M. A. C. 
Amherst showed ability at times but 
failed to carry the puck consistently. 
Ackerman proved invincible at his 
post, and Amherst was unable to score 
even when they broke through our 
outer defence. 

Consistent teamwork was not much 
In evidence on either side, but as Indi- 
vidual stars, our men outshone their 
rivals. Rough work was far less com- 
mon than usual in games between the 
Purple and Maroon but the game was 
no less Intense for the good nature dis- 
played. Sibley and King and Hutchin- 
son and Wooley shone for their respec- 
tive teams. 

The first half was characterized by 
hard, fast playing on both sides. The 
puck was In Amherst's territory, or in 
the middle of the rink for a large part 
of the period. Numerous advances on 
their cage were repulsed, but two 
goals were scored, the first after about 
12 minutes of play and the second just 
3 minutes later, Wooley caging the 
puck both times. 

Amherst came back strong at the 
beginning of the second period, their 
forwards carrying the puck the length 
of the rink, several times fo- unsuc- 
cessful shots at our goal. Their 
strength was short lived, however, for 
our forwards rushed the puck back to 
the Purple's defense where they kept It 
almost the whole of the remaining 
time, bombarding their goal with shots 
which only the best of work prevented 
from being scores. The last score of 
the game was made In the second half 
from a pass by Peckham after 5 min- 
utes of play. 
The line-up: 

M. A. C. AMHERST. 

g, Kimball 
p, fi4adden 
cp. Sibley 



Ackerman, g 
Walker, p 
Needham, cp 



Jones, r 
Hutchinson, e 



r. Miller 
e, Wilcox 



r 



i 

£ - 



iff' 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 20, 191 2. 



Wooley, Iw Iw. King 

Peckham. Sanctuary, rw rw, Cook 

Score— M. A. C 3, Amherst 0. Goals — 
Wooley 3. Referee— Dr. Tingley of Tufts. 
Goal referees— Tilden of Amherst, Wood of 
M. A. C Timer- Carpenter of Harvard. 
Time — 20-minute periods 

DRAMATICS 

[Continued from page 1] 



JUNIOR PROM 

(Continued from page I.] 



especially well in the scenes In which 
he showed his "temper" to his wife. 

In the minor characters, H. D. 
Allen '14 did well as Bigbee, the self- 
styled "Indian." Whidden '14 had 
his hands full as "double up" man, 
being equally good as an asylum super- 
intendent and as a large, life-sized 
policeman. Helma, Gibbs '15, to 
the relief of everyone, did not "yump 
her yob." 

The cast: 

Ebenezer Goodly, a professor of Anatomy, 

E F. Moore '15 
Mrs. Goodly. Ebenezer's wife. 

F B. Hills 12 
Marjorie. daughter to Ebenezer. 

F L. Gray '12 
Minerva, daughter to Ebenezer. 

D. J. Lewis '15 
Richard Heatherly. engaged to Marjorie, 

F W. Read "14 
Alvina Starlight, Mrs. Goodlys sister. 

H. W. Hyland '13 
Antony Goodly, D. D., Bishop of Ballarat. 

W. S. Moir. 13 
Cissy. Ebenezer's ward, S. M. Jordan '13 
Helma, Swedish domesttc, R. B. Gibbs " 15 
Thomas Holder, a policeman, 

B. C. Whidden 
William Bigbee. an Inmate of the Sana- 
toHum. H.D. Allen 13 

Henry Fuller. Superintendent of the Sana- 
torium. B C. Whidden 
Jones, who travels (or a hymn-book house. 

E. I. Wilde -12 

Music was furnished by the college 
orchestra under the direction cf John 
G. Hutchinson. The musical pro- 
gram included "Battleship Connecti- 
cut," selections from "Naughty 
Marietta." "The Pink Lady" and 
"The Amazon." 

SECOND PLACL IN RELAY 

[ContlButtd (rntn pac* 1 ] 



Dr. Herbert J. White of Hartford, 
Conn., spoke at chapel Sunday, using 
as his subject, "Happiness." 



any college, and the work being done 
can not be too highly commended. 

Caldwell proved another sensation in 
the 100-yard handicap, and but for a 
little poor headwork would have finished 
an easy first. Starting at the twenty- 
yard mark, he trailed the bunch of 
forty runners until the bell for the last 
lap. Here he started after the field 
and circling the bunch, finished second, 
beated only by inches by Lee of the 
B. A. A. in 2.17. Had he run the 
race from the start, he would have 
been able to omit the spectaular dash 
at the finish. 

The meet was a gathering of bril- 
liant athletes and close finishes were I 
always in order. The management of 
the meet and facilities for handling 
the crowd proved very poor and the 
floor was covered with spectators to an 
extent that was inexcusable. 



night, when a light supper was served, 
and at I o'clock the music struck up 
again. It was well along toward 4 
o'clock in the morning when the last 
couples drove away. 

The great succes of the "prom" 
was due in no small part to the efforts 
of the committee and other members 
of the junior class. The decorative 
Idea was conceived and executed by 
the committee in conjunction with the 
department of horticulture through 
Professor White, who was one of the 
faculty members on the committee. 
Benjamin W. Ellis of Plymouth, who 
was chairman, performed his work 
well and faithfully. The other mem- 
bers of the committee came in for 
their share of congratulations as well. 
They were Willard S. Little of New- 
buryport, J. Dudley French of Hyde 
Park, Everett H. Cooper of Wake- 
field, Glover E. Howe of Marlboro, 
Harold F. Jones of Brockton. Harold 
P. Bursley of Peabody, Ralph J. 
Borden of Fall River. Prof. Edward 
A. White and Prof. John A. McLean 
of the faculty. The patrons were 
President Kenyon L. Butterfleld and 
Professor McLean, and the patron- 
esses Mrs. Kenyon L. Butterfleld, 
Mrs. Philip B. Hasbrouck, Mrs. A. 
Vincent Osmun. Mrs. John A. Mc- 
Lean. Mrs. George F. E. Story and 
Mrs. Cornelius B. Zabrlskle. 

Btckford's orchestra of Greenfield 
played for the concert and for dancing. 
The concert program Included: Over- 
ture, Pique Dame,Supoe ; cornet solo, 
Fantasle Caprice, Levy, by L. 
A. Bemis ; Marcletta, string orches- 
tra. Sudessi, and selection from the 
Red Widow. The supper and cater- 
ing was done by Bias of Amherst. 
Among the guests were the following : 
Miss Alpaugh of East Orange, N. J. ; 
Miss Dimon of Groton. N. Y. ; Miss 
Peck of St. Johnsbury, Vt.; Miss 
Nicholls of Round Pond. Me. ; Miss 
Alvis of South Hadley; Miss Taft of 
Mendon; Miss Robinson of Pough- 
keepsie. N. Y. ; Miss Southworth of 
Brockton, Miss Strange of Marshfield; 
Miss Hood of Northampton, Miss 
Randlett of Roxbury; Miss Tuttle of 
Manchester, N, H ; Miss Sherman of 
Hartford, Conn.: Miss Keating of 
Salem, Miss Pepper of Newburg, N. 
Y. : Miss Jackson of Maiden: Miss 
Snell of Brockton, Miss Maileti of 
Bridgeport. Conn.; Miss Reigwin of 
Mt. Vernon. N. Y. ; Miss Anderson 
of Fall River; Miss Blanfried of Fra- 
mingham ; Miss Jordan of Rutherford, 
N, J.; Miss LeMay of Newark, N. 
J.; Miss C'jrtis of North Abington, 
Miss Stoddard of New York city ; Miss 
Carpenter of Attleboro, Miss Thatcher 
of Brockton, Miss Allen of Northamp- 
ton; Miss Howard of North Amherst, 
Miss Struss of Brooklyn, N. Y; Miss 
Adolphson of Springfield; Miss Home 
of Manchester, N. H; Miss Morse 
of Marlboro; Miss Gorman of Wor- 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 20, 1912. 



UP-TO-DATE 



* COLLEGE FOOTWEAR * 



Elite Shoes, 
Swell Shod Shoes, 
Pumps the fit, - 



$3.50 to $5.00 

- $5.00 and ^^6.00 

$4.00 



EXPERT REPAIRING 



Pages Shoe Store, 



BETWEEN THE BANKS 



HARRISONS NURSERIES... 

Berlin, Maryland. 
Have over two thousand acres in Nursery Stock. 
They offer a book on 

HOW TO GROW AND MARKET FRUIT 

Per 50 cents. 

All prospective buyers are invited to visit the 

Nursery. 

They are the largest growers of fruit trees in 

this country. 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, aod PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 




MI 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

The best workmanship, 

The latest styles, 

Reasonable prices 

Liacoln Building, Amherst, Mam. 



DURHAM - DUPLEX The Prospect House 



RAZOR 



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The Razor you have 

always seen at I5.00 

^ 35 Cents Each ^ 

For this lot 



DEUEL'S 

DRUG STORE 



PERRY'8- 



The place to eat after the game. 
Attractive tables and rooms. Excel- 
lent service. Catering a specialty. 



MRS. E. E. PERRY 

There are seven good reasons 
why TOO should buy 

COAL 



Of 



C. R. ELDER 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St 



Northampton, Mass. 



j$E. N. PARISEAU.j* 

Barber j^ SKop 

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No. 2 Pleaaant, St., Amherst, Maaa. 



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SPECIALISTS IN 
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cester; Miss Coy of Windsor. Vt.; 
Miss Crandall of Wakefield: Miss 
Bonsfield of North Adams; Miss 
Damon of Lynn and Miss Perry of 
Topelta, Kans. 

Others who attended from the fac- 
ulty: Professors Hurd, Chamberlain, 
Gage, Gates, Lindsey, Paige, Foord, 
Sprague and White. 

Also present were : W. F. Adams, 
O. G. Anderson, Brett, H. M. Baker. 
H. J. Baiter, C. Brewer. Borden, 
Bursley, L. A. Bevan, B. G. Blake. 
Carpenter. Cooper, Davis, Ells, Ellis, 
Edminster, French, Freeborn, Fager- 
strom, Gaskill, Greenleaf. F. W. 
Griggs, Harlow, Huntington. Hasey, 
Hemenway, G. E. Howe. R. W. 
Howe, Hyde, Hayden, Harris, Hatch. 
Hills, Heald, Howe, Jones, S. M. 
Jordan, W. S. Little, Lowry, Lodge, 
Mallet, Pellet. Pillsbury, Packard. 
Rochrs, Roberts. Raymond, Robin- 
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Moreau and Wales. 



If JOU WSDt to IM 

tiOLIU WITH THK <1IKI.H 

jrou muni Imve vonrrtothcu |irc».ioil ami cleaned 

AT BPSTHZlf' S 

II Amliy ""t. Maroon Store 

rrcaitlnc ami Cleanlnjj • ap* dally 

Mo«l liberal ticket ayateui In Iowa 



Aa I am directly comie<He<l wHIi a Wliolftiale 
IlnuM', I can 

8AVK YOr IHONKY ON CL0TIIK8 

will lie plfBiwil to show aamplraaml Mtyleaof 
Wlnirr SuU» an«l 0?rny»at». 






THE STORE 

FOR 

ETTER 
CieTHESl 

Clothing Heavily Reduced 

There are plenty of Clothes Sales these day.s. l.ut tliere'.s as much difference 
l)etweeti them and Iheir metliods, ami what ihey r«aily mean — and what yoii net for 
your money— as there is l>ctwcen the Clothes themselves. We are now holding our 

Semi-Annual Clearance Sale 

which means that 200 .Nk-n's ili^h (.rade Suits and i.'o .Mi-n's Overcoats will be 

sold at 1-5 nff from regular price 
10 Suits and Overcoats at >i6 00 |S Suits and Overcoats at I14 40 

All Suits and Overcoats at the .name discount 
It's the buying opp<»rtunity of the year. Don't miss it 

SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



TiiF Worthy. '''^^''^'■'- ^^^ Leonard 



FRANK H. DANFORTH. Man. 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




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To the American College! from the At- 
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Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 

Orders left at the Anherat Hoasc will receive 
prompt attention 



Toefil Mientka, 

Boot and Shoe Repairing, 

Done while you wail. 
^\.iiiiltc.<'i*Mt« A<lc«Hiai* 



Planning the fiihm 

Big things later — but now 
pleasures count — like Fatimas. 



20 for 
15 cenU 



fVHh ear h package nf Fallma uoo 
get a prnnnnl < oupon, 25 n/ wnic h 
trrurr a haruiaorrtr frit cntiege pen* 
tnntKl 2tJ2>—*ei^i>onoJI00, 



Another Big One ! 

BLACK AND WHITE WEEK 

We have just received 

200 BLACK AND WHIT!' I'lPES 

Made to sell for 25c, 350 and 500. During thi-, w.. 1< w will sell them for 

.And throw in a 

lOc Boxot the Famous Black and White Tobacco 

Come in and ask al)nut the Souvenirs we will >;ive witii i v. ry 
J5C purchase of Hlack an d White (:it;ats on S.ituniay. Vc\>. 2^ 

Henry Adams & Co. 



iLr\& i«kx:a.i^i^ ^toi'ts 



« »ii t •»«.' 1 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 20, 1913. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 20, 191 a. 



i'-^ 



b'^ 



4H 



%\ 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Africultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

ALDEN C. BRETT, 1912 EdltOf-ln-Chi«<. 

R. H. VANZWALENBURC. 13. Aulaunt Editor. 
JESSE CARPENTER. JR .1912 Maiu^lnf Editor. 
MARSHALL C.PRATT, 1912, Comj«titicn Editor 
ROYAL N. HALLOWELL. 1912, Athletics. 

JOSEPH A. HARLOW, 1912. Athletics. 

OSCAR C. ANDERSON. 1913, Ahimnf Notes. 
SILAS WILLIAMS. 191?, Dofxrlment Note». 

S. MILLER JORDAN. 1913. CoUeg* N«m. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMEIfT. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912 Business Manager. 

GEORGE ZABRISKIE. 1913 Asst. Bus. Managfer 
ERNEST S. CI ARK, JR.. 1914. Circulation. 

CHESTER E. WHEELER. 1914, ClrculatloB. 

STUART B. FOSTER. 1914. CfeutotloB. 

Subscription $1 50 per year. Single 
coptos, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Albcrt W. Dodgb. 



PSM Offlc*. 



matter at the Amheral 



VoL XXII. TUESDAY, FEB. 20. No. 18 



COLLEGE NOTES 

Informal Thursday afternoon — Prom 
decorations will be left up. 

The big week is a thing of the past 
— now for sack cloth and ashes. 

Mandolin club rehearsal will be held 
In chapel, Wednesday evening at 6 
o'clock. 

The last issue of Country Gentleman 
contains an elaborate article on "Farm 
Planning" by Prof. F. A. Wau?h 

The six special cars running to 
Hamp for the prom dramatics were 
hardly enough to accommodate the 
crowd. 

Signal competition closes the first 
of March; competors who haven't 
been working have a month of grace 
left them. 

After the fairly fast hockey game 
with Amherst on Wednesday, the 
Tech game resembled nothing so much 
as a good old fashioned game of 
shinny. 

A boys' club was organized recently 
in East Amherst with 14 charter 
members. The committee on con- 
stitution includes N. P. Larsen and 
Harold Gore. L. G. Caldwell of Am- 
herst college will manage the club. 

Prom sleighing parties were held by 
Q. V. T., ^S K, 2T A and K i. 
Q. T. V. drove to Montague Friday, 
K E to the same place on Saturday and 
<I> S K to South Deerfieid on Saturday. 
2 T A, went to Lock's Pond for a 
dinner-dance. 

The Juniors held a class meeting 
Siter assembly on Wednesday at which 
the following officers were elected : 
president, B. W, Ellis; vice-president, 
R-H. VanZwalenburg ; treasurer, G.E. 
Howe; secretary, C L. Thayer; 
class captain, H, F. Jones; sergeant- 
at-arms, A. F- McDougall. 

State Forester Frank W. Rane 
gave an Illustrated lecture Wednesday 
evening in the chapel on "Forestry 
Development of Massachusetts." He 
discussed the chestnut tree blight and 



explained that the state will send a 
man to advise owners whose lots are 
affected with this disease, who will 
give particular directions for its control. 
He also stated that for the protection 
of forest from fires, 15 lookouts will be 
established on prominent points in the 
state. 



ASSEMBLY 

Miss Ida M. Tarbell of New York 
addressed the assembly Wednesday. 
Her subject was "Abraham Lincoln 
an Inspiration to Young People." 
She spoke in part as follows; 

"Lincoln had a typical American 
endowment. The deliberate opera- 
tion of his mind and heart gave him 
a normal interest In men and events. 
Southern Indiana, the scene of his 
early life, afforded few advantages, 
but was prolific of difficulties. He 
learned the secret of meeting men, 
the laws of the nature of things and 
how to use the English language. 
He got at the bottom of things. He 
committed principles and literature to 
memory. 

"He attacked problems with ail 
earnestness. His habits required 
Intellectual order. Every fact was 
mastered in its relations to essential 
principles. Then he was always 
moved to state his conclusion so 
plainly that anybody could understand 
it. From a child he had a passion 
for clear thought and expression. He 
had no patience with unnecessary ver- 
biage. The few essential elements in 
a problem alone interested him. 

"Lincoln's style was the necessary 
result of clear thinking. He mas- 
tered the science of surveying. His 
mastery of the slavery question 
resuhed from long and patient labor. 
In his debate with Douglas he was 
master of all phases of the subject In 
dispute. He was never content with 
present attainments, but was con- 
stantly growing in power, with an open 
mind for new truth. He was ready to 
listen to others. He had the courage 
of his convictions. He felt that ulti- 
mate ends should never be sacrificed 
for temporary advantages. He was 
always honest with the people. He 
would not trifle with his own intellect- 
ual integrity or that of the people. 
Hs valued patience as the great factor 
In real success. He never did any- 
thing easily, but put his whole strength 
into his task. He would not waste 
his strength on easy jobs. Others 
could attend to these. 

"Lincoln's choice of men for im- 
portant posts was one great element of 
his power. He watched his men and 
soon discovered their value. He used 
men who could do specific things 
even though they failed in other things 
that were not immediately necessary. 
He never let personal matters interfere 
with the appointment of men useful to 
the country. Though men abused 
him he overlooked the injuries for the 
sake of the cause. He knew how to 



CHANOK OF LOCATION 

S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at si Pleasant St. 



Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

liruken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Fine Watch Repairing Promptly and 
Skilfully Done 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 



PARKS, 



Flowers for all occcasions. 

Mail or telephone orders given 
prompt attention. 

239 Main St., Northampton 

STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUQS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New t>i- 
gland of Special Student P'urnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 




It's a good thing not to worry about 
your pedal apparel, its correct, style 
comfort or durability. 

Buy your shoes from 

Tim Slop Ms Tlie SlylB 

'•Walk Over," Haywood Shoes, 

I3.50, I4.00, fs.oo 



Bolles " Special," Stetson Shoes, 

I5.00 to $8.00 



KKPAIKINO DEPARTMENT 

E.M. BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Next to Corner Urug Store. 



Angier, '13. 



Clark, '13. 



We have a full line of Manners, Post 
Cards, College Songs, Seal Papers, Foun- 
tain Pens, Candy, Tonic and Student 
.Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

BASEMENT OF NO. COLLEGE 



Eldridge, '14. 



Tarbell, '14. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



E WELL'S 



C&rptn-ter St Morehouse * 

PRir^TEI^Si 



No I, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mau. 



H. E. KINSMAN, 

College PbotograpDer 



NASH BLOCK, MAIN ST., 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



High-grade artistic work. Perfect satisfaction guaranteed. 

Studio newly equipped with large sky light 

and special lense for large 

groups. 

All styles the latest. Fine picture framing 



put the right man in the the right 
place, such as Stanton in the war and 
Seward in the place of secretary of 
state, though both men had not treated 
him civilly. Men of today appeal to 
the words and work of Lincoln for 
support in their struggles of this 
century. 

"Lincoln never stopped growing. 
He began anew the study of law at the 
age of 65. His life is a revelation of 
the possible attiainments of the human 
mind. He gives inspiration to each 
and every man to make the most of 
himself." 



second place, with five victories and 
one defeat. 

Last week's results : 

: M. A. C. 950, New Hampshire 805, 
1 North Georgia 925, Maryland 849, 
I Pennsylvania 922, West Virginia 892. 
■ Harvard 921. Norwich 878, Prince- 
ton 915, U. S. Vet. Sur. 851. Louis- 
iana 887, Delaware 862. 



STANDING OF THE SIGNAL 
COMPETITION. 

The standing In the comoetition for 
membership to the Signal B:)ard in 
the Editorial Department, including ma- 
terial submitted for issue of Feb. 13, 
is as follows: 



1913. 




H. W. Allen 


22.09 


F. D. Gripgs 


21.27 


Paul Serex. Jr., 


11.92 


1914. 




C. M. Allen 


18.37 


H. J.Clay 


15.56 


H. C. Black 


11.40 


E. F. Parker 


7.86 


R. N. Demond 


3.70 


1915. 




E. P. Moore 


15.57 


G. E. Donnell 


14.97 


J. A. Price 


13.71 



Remember competition closes March 
1. Material, to count for credit, must 
be passed in on or before midnight, 
Feb. 29. 



RIFLE LEAGUE RESULTS 

Returns for the Eastern League from 
Washington for the week gone show that 
MA. C. won the expected victory 
over West Vitginia with a wide mar- 
gin of 47 points. The team is still 
tied for first place with Princeton, the 
record of each being, six matches won 
and none lost. The high Individual 
score of the week for the league was 
made by Edminlster, whose score 
was 192. The high score for the 
Western league, 947, was shot by the 
Uaiversity of Iowa. The results of 
the matches are as follows: 

M. A. C. 942, W. Va. Univ. 895, 
No. Georgia Agric. College 921, 
Harvard 915, Princeton 915, Univ. of 
Penn. 891, Louisiana State Univ. 
891, U. S. College of Vet. Sur. 811, 
Norwich Univ. 842, Delaware College 
826, Maryland Agric. College 824, 
New Hampshire Stale 824. 

New Hampshire adds one more 
victory to the long list for our riflemen, 
the score this week being 950-805. 
The tie with Princeton still continues, 
M- A. C. and Princeton each having 
now won seven matches and lost none. 
Iowa still leads the Western League, 
vith six victories and no defeats. 
Minnesota and California are tied for 



EXTENSION WORK 

It is believed that the extension 
system adopted by M. A. C. of teach- 
ing practical agriculture Is responsible 
for the boom in the sale of aba'doned 
farms and farm land, which Is now 
going on. Many city people are in- 
structed by the work of the extension 
department, which results in the pur- 
chass of a country home. Many 
thousands of people have been helped 
by this department, which is undoubt- 
edly doing a great work for the state. 



THE "PIONEER CLASS" 

The latest addition to pictures of 
general interest which hang In the 
college library is that group of the 
class of '71, the pioneer class which 
gathered here at commencement last 
June for their fortieth anniversary. It 
is a fine old picture of "Aggie's" first 
graduating class. Out of a class of 
28, 18 were present at the last 
reunion. There are two college trus- 
tees in that notable class, namely, W. 
H. Bowker of Concord, and William 
Wheeler of the same town, who Is a 
consulting engineer of considerable 
reputation. 



ANOTHER M. A. C. BOOK 

Another text-book by an M. A. C. 
teacher will soon appear. The Mac- 
mlllan company, one of the largest 
text-book publishing firms, Is to 
publish Prof. Robert W. Neal's 
"Thought Building In Practice." 

The "Thought- Building" belongs to 
the "how-to-do" books. In it, attention 
Is turned to composition as a matter 
of practical thinking and expression, 
and simple rules are given for making 
use of the general principles, instead of 
a theoretical discussion of the laws of 
composition. 

Professor Neal's "Thought-Build- 
ing" is believed to be the first compo- 
' sition-manual that depends so much on 
simple logic In Its method, and gives 
formulas to enable the student to apply 
general principles to any particular 
'problem of expression. In pamphlet 
form, the book is in use this year by 
the freshmen in English. 



All records in the number of fail- 
ures at the University of Minnesota 
have been broken, as the result of the 
midyear examinations. Registrar 
Pierce says that notice of deficiency 
will be received by nearly 600 students 
and that many are dellcient In three 
studies. 



SOIL ROBBERY 

" Uncle Henry " Wallace, who presided over the great Conservation 
Congress at Kansas City last September, said that as a nation we had 
been "soil miners," mining and selling the surplus of availahle fertility 
which had been stored up for at;es. but that now we were "soil rubbers. 
The surplus of available fertility of enormous tracts of tillage land has 
been mined on an extensive scale, so that in many sections the product 
of the land has been reduced to the 'natural yield," that is, a yield based 
on the amount of plant food rendered available from year to year, which 
in turn is measured by the weakest link in the chain of fertility It can- 
not be foretold in what hour or in what year the weakest link will be dis- 
closed, but it is there and it may mean great loss. 

To preach dependence on potential soil fertility or the weakest link 
is not only poor economy and oat/ ethics^ but it is un.srientific, in that it 
will lead to crop bankruptcy and commercial loss Rather ureach in the 
growing of any crop, restoration of the plant food which it has removed, 
not only as crop insurance, but to maintain the integrity of the soil 
f'rof. .Stockbridge taught: 

" If the soil machine it a good one to much the better; if it has a 
balance of crop producing power to its credit, let us preserve that balance 
for an emergency. Let us not draw on it for present needs." 



ti 



STUDY THE PLANT FOOD PROBLEM " 



BOWKER 



Fertilizer Company 

43 Chatham St. Boston 



Kuppenheimer's 
Fine Clothes 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the Frencli Sboe 

CUSTOM TAILORING A SPECIALTT 

Thomas Hemknwav, '12, M. A. C. Representative 



YOU WILL FIND 
A FULL LINE 



OF 




IS S Cliiarelles 



TOBAOOO 



F. A. SHEPARD 

MEN'S STORE 




DUDLEY 

otrrriTT^R iw 

Fine Athletic Goods 

FOR EVERY SPORT 




AT- 



The College Drug Store 




•The BtST In Tnc World' 
Write for cataloge. 



Charles H. Dudley 

HANOVER, . . N. H. 

Agent, HAZEN *]4 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 30, 1913. 



The College Signal. Tuesday, February 20, 1912. 



GOODS FOR MEN. 

C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 

English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 




iftft<wy^Aft<fsfs^'- 



Highest Grade Roses 

\Vc are offering to our local patrons, selection from our large 
stock of finest Roses, especially grown for the Nkw York and HusioN 
Fi.owKR Markeis. 

THE MONTGOMERY CO., Inc.. 

hadi_e:y, mass. 
telephones. 

Amhertt. 196-R. 
Northampton, 660. 



GENUINE - THOMAS • PHOSPHATE - POWDER 

(Basic Slag Meal 

Grows Big Red Apples and Other Fruits 

TROPHIES WON BY USERS OF 

Genuine - Thomas - Phosphate - Powder 

— A I Till — 

GREAT NEW ENGLAND FRUIT SHOW 
Held at Boston, Mass.. October 33-28. 1911 

International Apple Shippers' Association's Cup for I<<-st Comntcrcial Kx- 

hihit of l'.Kke(l l- rtiil Won Ity Coiiycrs I- arm, (. A. Drew, Mjjr, tonn. 
Silver Cup for Best Display of Baldwin Apples offered l)v (iovenior 

Koss, i>f Massachusetts. Won hy I'. K. Winsor. Khodc IsianH 
Sliver Shield for Best Rxhibit of Rhode Island (Ireenlnjcs offered hv 

( .overnor I'othif-r, of Khode Island. Won hy I" K WniMir. Rhode Islann. 
$25.00 Cash for Best Barrel of Kin^ Apples off ert d l.v W. & li Douglas 

Comp.iiiv, of Conn.Mticut. Won l>y Illij.di Kopers, ( oiimcticut. 
First Prize for Best Barrel of Rhode Island iireenioKS. Won hy Klijah 

Rogers, ( onnecticMt. 
First Prize $50.00 Best 5 Boxes of Apples. Any \ariety or Varieties. 

Won l>y Conyer's Farm, '".. A. Drew, Manager, ("onnei lit ut 
Second Prize $25.00 for Best 5 Boxes of Apples. Any Variety or 

Varieties. Won i)y N. S Winsor. Rhode Isl.uui 
First Prize -Best Box Fxhibit of Apples. Won by Conyer's Farm. <i. A. 

Drew. Manager, Connecticut 
Silver nedal Best Packed Hxhibit of Apples. Won by Conyer's Farm, 

(',. A Drew. Manager. ( onnecticnt. 
First Prize Best Box of Rhode island (ireeninK^. Won hy 1. K. 

Winsor, Rhode Island. 
Sweepstakes for Best Box of Apples Packed for Market $75.00. VV On 

l.v Conyer's Farm, (i A. Drew. Manager, Conneclii i.i 
Berlin Prize $25.00 Cash and Sliver Medal. \\ <in Jiy Conyer's Farm, 

(, A. Drew, Manager, Conneiticut 
Connecticut Pomolojflcai Society Sliver Medal for Best Table of Fruit. 

Won 1)V Cr)nver"s Farm, C.. A. Drew. Ceneral Manager. ( onneclir ut. 
MassachusetU ARrlculturai College Sweepstakes for Winning Uirgest 

Number of Prizes. Won hy < ohvimn I- arm, (1 .\ In cu. Manager, Conn. 

Numerous Otlier I'rizes. Won by abuvc ari>l olhi-r users (lemiiiif 1 hnii.Ts riifspliiite I'nWilfr 

Why Not Put YOUR Fruit in the Prize Winning Class by Purchasing 

GENUINE THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

Key-Tree Brand. From 

TBB GOB -MORTIMER COMPANY 

51 Chambers Street, New Yoric City 

, > . R.,nVli>r "I'll to Date I'riiit (Jrnwitu; with Thomas Phosphate I'owilfi ," is sf-nt free if \oii 
Our MoOKiei, 1 mention Mr- College SiRnal. 



STOCKBRIDGE CLUB 

At a regular meeting of the Stock- 
bridge Club on Tuesday evening, the 



I 



and am interested in NEW ENGLAND 
AGRICULTURE and have devoted a 



officers of the present semester were Special Department of my business u< 
elected. The officers elected were the handling of FARMS and CO UN- 
president. F. S. Madison; vice-presi- 
dent, J. W. Lesure; secretary and 
treasurer, A. F. McDougal. 

At this meeting three silver cups ' Edition. Reliable agents wanted 
were presented to the stock-judging -j-^ |_|^ RAYMOND 

team of last fall. Professor Foord 
presented the cups in behalf of the 
Brockton Agricultural Association. 



TRY HOMES with F. P. MARSTON. 
N. H '81, as Manager. Correspondence 
solicited. Send for RAYMOND'S RED 
LF-TTFLR, Farm and Country Home 



Central .Square, 



CamhriJge, Mass. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES. 

EXTENSION. 

Last week Professor Wade lectured 
before the Springfield Y. ^ C. A. 
Professor Hurd spoke before the Bos- 
ton Federation of Religious Organ- 
izations, last Thursday. 

The apple packing school has proved 
very popular. It includes a registra- 
tion at 42, which Is largely composed 
of the most up-to date fruitgrowers in 
the state. 



E.B DICKINSON D.D.S. 

Williams Blo< k, Amherst, Mass. 

Offk K lloi RS: 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'78. — Dr. C. S. Howe, President of 
the Case School of Applied S-ience, 
Cleveland, Ohio, was one of the vice- 
presidents of the recent meeting of the 
American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science at Washington. D. 
C. Dr. Howe was chairman of the 
section of Mechanics and Engineering. 
The Febniary issue of Popular Scienti- 
fic Monthly contains pictures of all 
of the vice-presidents who served at 
the Washington meeting. 

78. Doctor Frederick Tuckerman 
was recently elected secretary of the 
Amherst Library Assoclktion. 

'91. — The last number of the Fruit 
Grower magazine, published at St. 
Joseph. Mo., has a fine illustrated 
article on the work of Henry M- 
Howard of West Newton. 

•95 __A. F. Burgess, U. S. Bureau 
of Entomology, Melrose, was re-elected 
secretary of the American Association 
of Economic Enioniolof?ists «it the 
Washington meeting. Mr. Burgess 
has served as secretary cf ths asso- 
ciation for the past five years anri has 
previously served one year as vice- 
president. In addition to bsing re- 
elected secretary Mr. Burgess was 
elected Business Manager of the 
Jourml of Economic Entomology. 

•96,— Dr. S..W. Fletcher, direc- 
tor of the Virginia Agricultujal Ex- 
periment Station, has published an at- 
tractive brochure on the outlook for ; 

1 

fruit growing in Virginia. | 

'00, — Announcement has been j 
made at Harrisburg, Pa., of the en- 
gagement of Miss Ruth K. Martin, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Mar- 
tin to Prof. James W. Kellogg, chief 
chemist of the State Department of ; 
Agriculture. Miss Martin is a niece ' 
of State Senator W. A. Martin, of 
Gettysburg. The weddding will take 
place in the summer. 



FOR FARMS ! 

Big, Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Hoiiie.s or Building Lots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W. R BROWN 

Savings Bank Bl'k, 

Amherst. Mass 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

Higli-Graiii College Work 
LAUNDRY 



Shirts, 


- 


10 ISC 


Collars. 




:c 


Cuffs, - 


* 


JC 


Plain wash. 




40C per do/ 


.Same, rough dry, 


- 


- 25c per <lo/ 



Ralph R. Parker, agent, C. S. C. House. 
85 I'leasanl St, 

Francis S. Madi.son, agent for iqis and 
short course, \'ft I.;»l>. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Fred S. .Merrill. S C. House 

85 rif..- !• \ ^t 

Put full name and a«Jilres.< on laundn 




THIS CATA106UE 
SHOULD BE 
IN THE HANDS 
OF EVERY ONE 
INTERESTED IN 

ATHLETIC SPORT 

>IhII<iI I r<'<' 



Kxpericnced u.s«-i>> 
;i(jrec that Wright 
\ nitson articles 
.itf superiur. rhe\ 
.ire ilesigned .Tiiil 
ni.4i;le by men who 
aie'expert't and who 
know how to use Ihf 
Kiindx theniselven 



Complete Equipment for Lawn 
Tennis, Base Ball, (iolf, Cricltet, 
Track and f ield Sports, Basket 
Ball, Foot Ball and Lawn (iames 



Wruht ,S: Ditson 
Lawn I ennis (iuide 
10 Cents 



Wright & Ditton 
BaNf Hall ("tuide 
10 Cents 



To save time aJdress our near f si store 


WRIGHT & 


DITSON 


344 WashinKton 5t 


, Boston, riass. 


NBW YORK CHICAdO 

■ J2 W.iiren ^t. iiq .\. Wabiish Ave. 

SAN PRANCISCO 
1 .?5q Market St. 
PROVIDBNCB, R. i. CAMBRItHJE, MASS. 

76 Weybos^et -St. Harvard Square 



^. ,. \ 



, , niRiicits 



C.tt'. 







'02. — A. C. Monahan Is author of 
two bulletins from the U. S. Bureau 
of Education. One is on agricultural 
education, giving special attention to 
the work of secondary schools, and 
the other deals with opportunities for 
graduate study in agriculture in the 
United States. 

'02.— C. M. Parker has closed his 
place at Brookfield and is spending the 
winter season in Florida. 

'09. — Homer Cutler has removed 
from Texackana, Texas, to Wallis, 
Idaho. 

•10— A letter from Louis C. Brown. ' 
on board the "Princess Irene. Nord- 
deutscher, states that he has resigned ! 
from the Constabulary of the Philip- 
pines on account of ill health. His 
temporary address will be Bridge- 
water, Mass, Mr. Brown Is consider- 
ing a venture in the Importing busi- 
ness, dealing exclusively in Philippine 
products such as cigars, cigarettes, 
laces, dress goods, etc. 

'10. — W. C. Johnson is covering 
Western Pennsylvania and portions of 
West Virginia and Ohio for the Coe- 
Mortlmer Fertilizer Company. His 
address is box 225, Dubois, Pa. 




THE 
SMOOTHEST 



Conn. Valley SI. Rj. \m 



JUST the smoke after a wKirl 
in the gym. The best leaf in 
the land — aged over two years 
— perfect maturity — all harshness 
eliminated — not a bite in a thou- 
sand pipes — a flavor dilightfully 
good — wonderfully smooth. No 
tobacco ever recelvLd such care 
— no other tobacco is so smooth! 
You will delight in its goodness 
— enough — ask yoi:r dealer. 

SPAULD!NG & MERRICK 
CHICAGO 





Full Two 
Ounce Tina 



One Ounce 
Bags, 5 Cents* 

Convenient 

for Cigarette 

Smoker» 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations,violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the ofi&ce in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

»7 Main St., Masonic BIdg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 

In so far as our benefits arc inuluai. 

THE AMHERST GAS COMPANY 

Everythirig Eleotrioal 



\¥ 



Scbool and Colksc Pbotograpfters 



• # * 



Closed only from t A. M. to 4 A.M. 




I r^r^AI lY' sa Center St.. Northampton, Mass., 
L.<JO/ii-i-r. 3 ^^^ g^^^j^ Hadley, Mass. 



Majn Officr : 

1546-1548 Broadway, 

New York City 



These .Studios of!er the l)e»t skilled 
artisU and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



M.D. OILMAN. 



STEAM Fin ISr;. TeJeption* i»-4. 

c. A. Morrrr. oas fi t riso. tinnino 



TBLBPHONB .07,^,^ zU?\.l% DANCE & SON, 
GILMAN and MOFFET, 



Manufacturers of and Wholesale De^erm 



IN 



CONFECTIONERY. 

SOT to til Mai* Stbebt. 

WojMBsxES, Mass. 



PLUMBERS. 



Speciahy of KepaiririK 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Wini>ows, 
Lead Licihts, &c. 
t Clifton Ave., AMHERST, MASS. 



The Collcfc Signal, Tuesday. February 20^1912. 



n. J. Upoile, Inc. 



Proprietors of 



liDrO-LIVEBY-IIOHSE 

Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 

Tel. 183. 




ASK YOUR 

STATIONER 

FOR 



Ward's Fountain Fens, Fine Papers 
and Envelopes, Students' Supplies. 
Send for samples of Engraved Invita- 
tions, Class and Fraternity Paper, 
Banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, etc. 

SAMUEL WARD CO. 



H 



Massachusetts Agricultural Gollese 




'S 



5763 Franklin Street 
BOSTON 



All Styles of 



SWEATERS 
AND JERSEYS 






Trains men for attractive positions in vocations 
that are not overcrowded. 

Tuition is free to residents of Massachusetts. 

Necessary expenses are moderate. 

A CATALOG WILL BE SENT ON REQUEST 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

LKNS OKINUINO 

Fu// line of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



TRADE 



,9MAPK 






Ton. mA' 



Complete Line of 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association. 

Nineteen Hundred Thirteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Fourteen Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club. 

Dramatic Society, 

Debating Society, 

Public Speaking Council, 



Athletic Goods 
and BANNERS 



H. C. Walker, President 

Geo. H. Chapman, Secretary 

W. J. Covill, Manager 

R. J. Borden, Manager 

R. T. Beers, Manager 

H H. Wood, Manager 

S. M. Jordan, Manager 

O. G. Anderson, Manager 

E. S. Clark, Manager 

F. S. Madison, President 

L. S. Caldwell, President 

J. D. French, Manager 

W. J. Weaver, President 

G. W. Ells, Secretary 

Geo. Zabriskie, Manager 

J. M. Heald, President 

T. J. Moreau, President 



PROMINENCE 

Is given here to the fact that we lake 

special care in the posing of 

subjects in order to bring 

out all the good 

features. 

Light and shade is skilfully diffused. 

This and the excellent finish makes 

our PHOTOGRAPHS masterpieces 

of reproductive art. 

SHILURE'S STUDIO. 
142 Malt St., Nortkainplon 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blanlcets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CLELANSING. 

PREISSINO. 

REPAIRING. 

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THE NEW ENGLAND NEWSPAPER 

All the news and the Truth 
about it, in the :: :: 

SpriDgfleld Republican 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 
News fully reported. 

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DaUy, $8. Sunday, $J. IVeekly, $/. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Vol. XXII. 



M ASSACH U SETTS AGRICULTURAL C O LLEGE! 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, February 27, 1912. 



So. 19 



TOSS WINS FOR WESLEYAN ' CONNECTICUT ALUMNI 



In Dual Track Meet. Score 34-34- 
Close Contests. 



Gather in 



Spring^eld for 
Elect Officers. 



Banquet. 



The dual meet between Wesleyan 
and M. A. C. on Saturday resulted in 
a tie of thirty-four points each. A 
coin was tossed to settle the tie and 
good luck smiled on Wesleyan. 

The first event was the thirty-yard 
dash, In which Wesleyan took first and 
second places. Friefelt was first man 
and ran it in 3 4-5 seconds. Davies of 
M. A. C. took third place. 

The mile run was the second event. 
Harris of Wesleyan ran a pretty race 
and took first place doing the mile in 
4 minutes, 4 1-5 seconds. "Ben" 
Sauthvlck ran a hard race but as the 
Wesleyan man was a little too speedy 
for him, he had to be content with 
second place. "Beany" Baker pas- 
sed his man on the last lap coming in 
intrd. 

••Big Sam" showed up in his usual 
form In the shot put which was the 
next event. He outdistanced the 
second man by 3 feet and 9 3 4 inches. 
His distance was 44 feet, 6 3-4 inches. 
Lloyd had second place "cinched" 
until the last throw when the Wesleyan 
man beat him by 4 Inclws. • 

M. A. C. made a good showing In 
the 300-yard da.sh, making first and 
second place. "Cap" Johnny Ciapp 
was the winner and his time was 37 
3-5 seconds. Nicolet was second 
man and ran a Rood race. Wendell 
who started out in this event was 
forced to drop out owing to his strain- 
ing a tendon. This was pretty hard 
luck for Wesleyan for Wendell is their 
crack relay man. 

The two mile run was the prettiest 
event of the meet. The men held 
together like burrs, Harris the Wes- 
leyan man setting the pace until the 
fifteenth lap when Caldwell broke into 
the lead without any trouble. Cald- 
well kept gaining on his man and came 
:n strong In first place 1 1 minutes and 
9 seconds after starting. Wesleyan 
came in second and Baker put up a 
prettey little sprint and came In ahead 
of his man. 

Wesleyan made first place In the 
600-yard dask. Whitney came In 
second and Wesleyan third. Whitney 
had first place easily but fell when 
within two yards of the tape. He 
rolled over the line barely In time to 
gel second. Clark was obliged to 
leave the track for a short distance 
while trying to pass his man on the 
inside of a bank. 

Our lack of high jumpers was forci- 
bly brought to mind during the next 
event. The take off was very poor. 



SOPHOMORES WIN 



LARGEST info! lAL 



'j: 



Loose Hockey Oame ii-a. 
Outclassed. 



Freshmen 



The Connecticut Valley Alumni 
A?»^oclation held their annual meeting 
at Springfield on Thursday evening. 
After the banquet at the Hotel Kim- 
ball, the association elected officera 
for this year, and heard speeches by 
President Butterfield and others. 
The officers elected are : President, 
George Leonard, '77 ; vice-presidents, 
M. H. Williams. '92. and Dr. James 
E. Root, 76; secretary, C. L. Brown, 
•94, treasurer. E. F. Gasklll, "06. 
President Butterfield said in part: 
"As far as 1 am concerned, my pur- 
pose is to make M. A. C. a distinctly 
Agricultural College. A document In 
the State House, recently published, 
suggested that M. A. C. may become 
eventually a state university, 1 do not 
believe that this would be advisable at 
Amherst. As for the commission 
whose appointment has been suggested. 
1 think It would be the best thing that 
could happen to the college. We 
have a definite plan and purpose, and 
an Investigation would be most wel- 
come." 

President Butterfield went on to 
speak of the new spirit which has de- 
veloped, and which Is expressed in the 
motto, "Boost Old Aggie." This 
motto, which was first presented at a 
banquet in Springfield, was adopted at 
a recent College Night at Draper Hall. 



The sophoinores won a one-sided 
hockey game from the freshnen Sat- 
urday morning 11-2. The play was 
centered from the middle of the rink to 
the freshmen's cage practically the 
whole game; 1915 obtaining but three 
or four shots. That two of these 
resulted in goals does not speak well 
for the goal and cover point. 

For the freshmen Johnson, Archi- 
bald and Bartley played the best; while 
Hutchinson, Wooley and Jones excel- 
led for the sophomores and caged most 
of the points. Wooley especially was 
right in everything, and displayed more 
vigor and energy than any other man 
on the rink. 

One commendable feature of the 
game was the absence of rough playing, 
very littie being noticeable. 
The l(ne-uo : 



Ever Held at the College ; ^ .Couples. 
Prom Decorations Up. 

The largest Informal ever held at the 
college took place on the afternoon of 
Washington's Birthday. There were 
over 110 couples present; the large 
attendance being mainly due to the fact 
that the Junior Prom decorations had 
been left in place for the occasion. 
The patronesses were : Miss Parker 
of Smith College. Miss Wells of Mt. 
Holyoke College; Mrs. Joseph Cham- 
berlain and Mrs. Charles R, Duncan 
of Amherst. Many of the faculty 
and local alumni were present. Music 
was furnished by Connally's orchestra 
of Northampton. 



1915. 

rw. Haaklns, Little 

Iw. Bartley 

c. Draper 

r, Johnson 



16»5. 

Wooley. rw 
Hcffron. Iw 
Hutchinson, c 
Jones, r 

Sherman, Peters, p p. Hathaway, Fitsgerald 
Norton, cp cp. Archibald 

Nissen, T A. Nicolet. g g. H W. White 
Score— 1914 11, 1915 5 Referee- Peck- 
ham '12. Umpire -Ackerman '12. Timer 
-Covin '13 Tlme-2a-minute halves. 



RIFLE TEAM 

The Rifle Team. In the match 
against North Georgia, dropped a few 
points below the high average standing 
of the past few weeks. North Georgia 
stands high In the league, and has 
been shooting excellent scores right 
along, but the team is confident that 
their score of 938 will be sulflclenl to 
win the match. The Individual scores 
of the week w«A aa follows : 

S««n<llng, Pron*. 



NINETEEN FOURTEEN INDEX. 

The board for the Nineteen Four- 
teen Index has been chosen and the 
work for preparing what is to be the 
best Index ever yet published," has 
begun. The board Is as follows : S. 
B. Foster, Editor-in-Chief ; R. S. 
Bragg, Assistant Editors. S. B, Free- 
born, R. H. Powers, M. D. Lincoln, 
R. H. Taylor, and C. E. Wheeler, 
Associate Editors: C. Bokelund, A. 
S. Coe, and T. W. Nicolet, Art 
Editors. E. S. Clark. Jr.. Business 
Manager;and T. A. Nicolet, Assistant 
Business Manager. 



STOCKBRIDGE CLUB 



At the meeting of the Stockbridge 
Club on Tuesday evening Mr. Castner 
I spoke on "The East Compared to the 
West in Apple Growing." Mr, Cast- 
ner, who Is himself a Hood River 



A special message was sent to the 
House last week by Governor Foss 
relating to appropriations for M A. C. 
Governor Foss Is opposed to any bill 
giving appropriations to this college, 
i because, he says, the work here is 
'not absolutely confined to teaching 
agriculture. Governor Foss believes 
that M. A. C. gives a man too 
broad an education, and until th; college 
narrows down and becomes a farmers' 
school, strictly speaking, he says he 
feels that he cannot approve the 
expenditure of as much money as is 
asked for. 

It Is the general opinion here that a 
broad education is most beneficial, 
and preferable to a one sided educa- 
tion. It seems as though a state col- 
lege, even an agricultural college, 
should develop broad-minded men, 
who were fitted to be leaders. Why 
Is Foss opposed to a general 
education? 



McDougal, 

Edminlsier, 

Griggs, 

Lloyd, 

Whitmore, 



90 
92 
91 
90 
87 



100 
97 
97 
96 
99 



Total, 
The other men shooting were 

S«»i»4ln«- Prone. 

Hyde, 88 97 

Forbush, 88 

Clark. 87 



96 
97 



Later. 
M. A. C. 



and 



Total. 

190 
189 
187 
186 
186 

938 

185 
184 
184 

still 



Princeton are 
tied for first place In the rifle league. 
Last week's shoot resulted in a victory 
for M. A. C. over North Georgia Col- 
lege by a score of 938 to 931. This 
is the closest score that we have had, 
and It Is probable the closest that we 
will have In some time. 



A creamery company in the irriga- 
tion belt of Washington state Is meet- 
ing with success In Its experiment with 
the instalment plan of the effete East. 
Since the 1st of October more than 
300 cows have been turned over to 
the farmers of the region, and It Is 
expected that the number will be 
1000 during the year. 



An Iowa city high school boy is 
ner who IS nimseii a nooa r..»c. said to have broken the world's record j increased to 



2.1 



offers a great opportunity for apple 
growing. In his talk he briefly 
summed up the advantages of the 
East in fruit growing. 



Perhaps In a few years, crack high 
school "shots" will be In as much 
demand by the colleges, as prep school 
athletic stars are now. 



stocking up their farms with registered 
cattle. The enterprise of the Cana- 
dian Northwest Is an energetic stimu- 
lant to the American neighbors. 



< 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 27, 191a. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 27, 1912. 



TOSS WINS FOR WESLEYAN 

[Continued fmm page 1 ] 



the smooth waxed floor, although rosin 
had been sprinkled on, did not offer 
any foothold whatever. Wesleyan got 
first and second in this event. Hunt- 
ington took third place. 

The relay race was looked forward 
to being the best event of the meet but 
Wesleyan was obliged to forfeit on 
account of Wendell's injury in the 300 
yard race. The Aggie team, however, 
ran an exhibition race in faultless 
style. The time, 3 minutes and 16 
seconds. 

The men as a whole were pretty 
evenly matched and there were some 
good times made. The conditions for 
taking care of a crowd showed how 
much we need good gymnasium and 
general athletic facilities. 

The summary: 

30-yard dash — Won by Friefelt 
Wesleyan, Mendell Wesleyan, second; 
Davies M. A. C, third. Time, 3 4-5 
seconds. 

300-yard dash —Won by Clapp M. 
A. C. : Nicolet M A. C, second: 
Hohon Wesleyan, third. Time, 37 
3-5 seconds. 

Two-mile run — Won by Caldwell M. 
A. C. ; Harris Wesleyan, second; 
Baker M. A. C, third. Time 11.9. 

600-yard dash — Won by Halvorson 
Wesleyan; Whitney M. A. C. 
second; Hohon Wesleyan, third. 
Time, 1.25. 

One-mile run — Won by Harris of 
Wesleyan; Southwick M. A. C, 
second; Baker M. A. C, third. 
Time. 4.41. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES. 

POMOLOGY 

The apple packing school closed 
with a contest for a series of prizes. 
The following are the prizes and win- 
ners: 

First prize. "American Apple Orch- 
ard," Wau^A, to L. J. Reynolds, 
Greenwich, Ct. 

Second prize. "Nursery Book." 
Bailey, to E. F. Putnam, Easthamp- 
ton, Mass. 

EXTENSION. 

On Monday, Professor Hurd lectur- 
ed at Simmons College on "The 
Need of Home Economics in Rural 
Communities. 

Last week Miss Constable gave 
17 lectures on domestic science be- 
fore, girls teachers and women in 
Essex County. 

Mr. Story gave an address before 
the Grange In Hardwick, last Tuesday 
evening. His subject was "Dairy 
Ration." Mr. Jenks also lectured on 
Monday night In Hudson. 

The February issue of " Facts for 
Farmers " Is now out, This number 
Is on " Disinfectants and Disinfection 
in Relation to Poultry Husbandry," 
by Dr. George Edward Gage. A great 
deal of valuable information Is given 
on the subject. 



Professor Waid lectured at the 
Worcester Y. M. C. A. last Tuesday 
evening, on "Soil Fertility." This 
is one of series of lectures on the same 
subject given in connection with the 
courses offered by the Worcester Y. 
M. C. A. school. 

The 1912 class of Short Course 
students attempted an innovation last 
Tuesday evening In the form of a ban- 
quet, held at the Amherst House. It 
was largely attended and very success- 
full. The class met In the liotel par- 
lors at 7 o'clock and held an informal 
reception. Members of the faculty 
who have been connected with the 
course were present as guests of the 
class. Over 100 sat down to a good 
dinner. President E. J. McGuill of 
the class presided and introduced F. 
A. G. Pease of Merden, Ct., as toast- 
masier. Prof. Sears spoke of the 
possibility of an overproduction of poor 
apples in Massachusetts. Dr. R. J. 
Sprague next talked about the dangers 
of being narrow minded and the nec- 
essity for a hobby. He was followed 
by Dr. H. T. Fernald who told of the 
advantage of good observation. As 
the final speaker of the evening. Prof. 
Wm. D. Hurd told of the great suc- 
cess the course had had this year. 

Prof. Hurd gave an address on 
'•Waste upon the Farm," at the 
Springfield Y. M. C. A., last Thurs- 
day evening. 

The two weeks school of Apple 
Packing closed last Saturday after a 
remarkably successful course. The 
class elected for Its president F. How- 
ard Brown, of Marlboro, and for sec> 
retary and treasurer, A. Russel Paul, 
of South Framingham. Several class 
pictures were taken, and a valuable 
souvenir was presented by the class to 
the Pomology department. 

ENGUSH DEPARTMENT. 

The journalistic branch of the Eng- 
lish department Is very active and 
prosperous. Room C, South college 
has been turned into a laboratory for 
journalism. Representative news- 
papers and magazines have been 
placed In the room together with a 
large easel and bulletin boards. 
These latter enable different types 
of "stories." illustrations and journal- 
istic work in general to be displayed to 
the best advantage. 

Arrangements have been made for 
the department of journalism to supply 
the "College Department" of the 
New York Times with M. A. C. notes. 

The first number of the "Bay State 
Ruralist," a department of industrial 
news, was published last Sunday In 
the Springfield Union. The material 
for the department Is reported by stu- 
dents in journalism. Also a short 
write up on the horticultural depart- 
ment of the college Is to be supplied 
to the Agricultural Student of the Ohio 
State University, by the journalism 
department. 



UP-TO-DATE 



* COLLEGE FOOTWEAR * 



Elite Shoes, 
Swell Shod Shoes, 
Pumps the fit, - 



$3.50 to $5.cx) 

- $5.00 and $6.00 

$4.00 



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BETWEEN THE BANKS 



HARRISON'S NURSERIES... 

Berlin, Maryland. 
Have over two thousand acres in Nursery Stock. 
They offer a book on 

HOW TO GROW AND MARKET FRUIT 

For 50 cents. 

All prospective buyers are invited to visit the 

Nursery. 

They are the largest growers of fruit trees in 

this country. 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
(^ Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Be sure you load your Kodak or 
any Camera with the genuine 

Eastman Film 



k:o]3.^k:&^ 



Viclor lalKlDji macnifles 




PHOTOGRAPHER 

The best workmanship. 

The latest styles. 

Reasonable prices 

Lincoln Building, Amherst, Mass. 



The Prospect House 



-PERRY' 



The place to eat after the game. 
Attractive tables and rooms. Excel- 
lent service. Catering a specialty. 



DEUEL'S 

DRUG STORE 



>ksxat»«c>«e« ttanEkmm» 



MRS. e:. e. perry 


There are seven good reasons 


why YOU should buy 


COAL 


C. R. ELDER 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



jtB. N. PARISEAU.^ 

Barber j^ SKop 

RAZORS HONED 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

(Notices for this column should be dioppsd In the 
Signal Office or hsnded to R. H. VanZwalenburg 
'13. on or before the Saturday precedlnc each issue.] 

Feb. 27, 6-45 p. m.— Stockbridge 
Club, Room G, South College. 
6-55 P. M. — Landscape Art 
Club, Wilder Hall. 

Feb. 28, 1-30 p. m.— Assembly, W. 
M. Danner of Boston. 

Feb. 29, 6-45 p. m.— Y. M. C. A. In 

Chapel. 
Mar. 2. 6-45 p. m.— Social Union 

Entertainment in Chapel. 

Ralph Dana. 

Track Meet, Hartford. 

Mar. 3. 9-15 a. m.— Chapel. Rev. J. 
W. Campbell of Newtonvlile. 



No. 2 PleaMOt, St., Amherst. MaM. 



THE 



Hoover & Smith Go. 

616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 

Diamond Merchants 

PhlladelpMi's Offlelal Fratemlti Jeweler 

BPEOIALISTS IN 
Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prises, Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, Charms.-. 



M, E, ANDREWS 

5ucces«or to S. S. HYDH 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 



Fine Repairing a Specialty 

7 I'leasant St. Phillips Block 

Amherst, Mass. 



Barsalotti & Gentoso 

Clgara ClKarettes 

Nice Line Freah Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit, Soda, Etc. 

The Right Good* at the Kifiht Price* 

Open till 11 o'clock EVERV ai«ht 
<'oraer Aitiliy •■d Pl«»«««» >»tr«»t« 



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It's the atrenuous life and the 
midnight oil. Help the grind 
with a few Fatima Cigarettes. 



20 for 
15 cents 



W»h tmh txtkatt ffrMmaym 
ftt a pennant coupon. 2 1 of i^hich 
(rruir a hanJtomr frk coilegt pen- 
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THE STORE 

FOR 

ETTER 
CLOTHES! 




Clothing Heavily Reduced 

Tlitre are plenty of Clothes .Sales these days. l>iit llierc's .»s much difference 
between ihein and liicir methods, and what ihey really mean -and what ycu gel for 
your money— as there is between the Clothes themselves. We are now holding our 

Semi-Aiinual Clearance Sale 

which means that aoo Men's High (.radc .Suits and 120 Men's Overcoats will be 

sold at 1-5 off from regular price 
ao Suits and Overcoats at $16 00 i» Suits and Overco.its at |i4'40 

All Suits and Overcoats at the same discount 
It's the buying oppi>rtunity of the year. Don't miss it 

SAKDERSOW & THOMPSON 



TlIK WORTin*. COTRELL and LEOHfcRD 



FRANK H. DANFORTH. Mcii. 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 




ALBANY, 
N.Y. 



SI 



Mikirt 

If 



A OOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the At- 
._!. -. /I «- i« Uotk.Luii.. lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 

AmherHl Corner In R«tn.sKt'llar. jjp^j.ij^|(y 



M. B. M AGRATH & SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Toefil Mientka 

Shoes stilned and Polished 



Make old shoes look like new 

Neat, classy workmanship 

Orders k(t at the A inherit Hou»« will receive (ipm Mundwy l'lri«»«nl Hi. 

prompt attention. Ju5» B«low V".it\ -t. 



Sticking and Staying Oualities 



Hou are you ^'etting along with your work? Are you sticking hy it, 
and staying with it in every detail, or are you letting things slide? 

REXAIL EMULSION OF COD LIVER OIL 

to stick and slay, increases yuur ambition, because it rt\ . and 

nourishes your entire system. Work with might and woik right. 
Be a sticker and stayir. lake a b-ttlc <>( Rexall Kmulsion of Cod 
Liver Oil for that run-down s\stem. i-pint bottle, TSTiiJf 

When you study late and ii^\ worn out and d< i^rt-ssed, do not forget 
that at our store your every drug want can be supplied in a most 
careful and painstaking manner. 

Henry Adams & Co. 



TTlit? KI5:XA.I^1^ «t<>i-*i' 



»♦•! fl»«« *,'«»r-t»«r' 



'. I 




The College Signal, Tuesday, February 27, 1912. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 27, 191 2. 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 

the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOABD OF EDITORS. 

ALDEN C. BRETT. 1912 EdHor-ln-ChW. 

R. H. VANZWALENBURC. '13. AiaUtant Editor. 
JESSECARPENTER. JR .1912 M«i»rlne Editor. 
MARSHALL C. PRATT. 1912, Comt«lition Editor 
ROYAL N. HALLOWELL. 1912, Athletics. 

JOSEPH A. HARLOW. 1912. Athletics. 

OSCAR G. ANDERSON. 1913, AhimnI Note. 
SILAS WILLIAMS. 1917. Defwrtment Noter 

S. MILLER JORDAN. 1913, College Notes. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912. Buslnew Manager. 

GEORGE ZABRISKIE. 1913 Awt. Bus. Manager. 
ERNEST S. CI ARK. JR.. 1914. Circulation. 

CHESTER E. WHEELER. 1914, ClrcuUthw. 

STUART B. FOSTER. 1914, C'rculstton. 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Albert W. Dodge. 



Bwtwd as aMond-ciaas manor at the AmhOTSt 
IHI Offlee. 



Vol. XXII. TUESDAY. FEB. 27. No. 19 



For the second time, we, as a col- 
lege, have had inflicted upon us one of 
those masterly pieces of literature 
commonly known as, His Excellency 
the Governor's Message Concerning 
the Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege. It is clearly apparent thai In 
the latest endeavor of worthy chief- 
executive has tried to surpass both In 
originality of thought and brilliancy of 
suggestion his masterpiece of a year 
ago. 

The governor still seems to be 
somewhat inclined to favor the change 
of the college into a demonstration 
farm, but his ideas on tha* subject are 
not as clear cut and pos>tive as those 
of last year, and should he continue in 
office he will probably, in time, wholly 
outgrow this fault. 

Being a business man, his excel- 
lency's strongest point is his ability to 
manipulate figures and so, In the first 
paragraph, he quite carries us off our 
feet by the rapidity of his calculations. 
He starts with the regular running ex- 
penses, adds the total number of stu 
dents, divides by the number of years 
since prexy assumed his office, rings 
a few more double changes and then 
calmly announcjs that in the next few 
years the college will require $15,000,- 
000, We are taken wholly unawares 
and for the rest of the session he has 
us absolutely at his mercy. 

His next paragraph starts off with 
the words, "I cannot find." This as- 
sertion If made by any other man 
would reveal a weakness, but t ot so 
with him. It is simply his way of 
saying, — "There Is notning to find." 
Voila'. the subject is closed. 

His excellency's chief objection to the 
college seems to be that from his point 
of view It Is not confining itself to 
strictly agricultural instruction, and he 
even takes it upon himself to cite cer- 
tain subjects which he deems to be out 
of place In such a college. We can 
afford to be patient and to explain to 
him, gently but firmly that things are 
not always what they seem, that the 



practice of both agricultural chemistry 
and landscape gardening necessitate a 
thorough knowledge of "higher mathe- 
matics," that the practice of landscape 
gardening Is absolutely dependent on 
"advanced engineering," and that the 
German "language," the study of 
which he would bar, contains the best 
reference works on both chemistry and 
botany ; but when to cap the climax, he 
begrudges us our course In music 
which is given by the German profes- 
sor to a select few, one evening a 
week at the home of the instructor, 
the situation becomes absolutely 
ludicrous. 

It is clearly evident that his excel- 
lency Is still living in the realm of his 
grandfathers, as far as his conception 
of agriculture and agricultural condi- 
tions is concerned. To any up-to- 
date, well-informed person his claims 
are nothing but ridiculous. 

In the result of this misdirected zeal 
we have been able to discover however 
one thought which seems to approach 
an intelligent comprehension of the 
subject. His excellency says, "I 
believe the original intention of this 
school was to teach practical agricul- 
tural subjects and to provide suitable 
college training for young farmers." 
Wonderful ! but what next ? The 
work of the college does not end with 
the men taught directly; It has a far 
wider influence. Each of these men 
must go out into leadership in his own 
rural community. Can you picture a 
strong leader possessed of simply the 
narrow, one-sided training indicated In 
the report as ideal for a college of this 
kind } 

His excellency asks for a commis- 
sion of five men to look into the con- 
ditions under which the college exists 
and to recommend a policy. A very 
W3rthy suggestion to be sure, but If 
the findings of this commission are to 
have only as much weight with his 
excellency as did the recommenda- 
tions of his expert of a year ago, their 
time and efforts would be worse than 
wasted. 

We do not advocate, as the governor 
seems to suppose, that the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College be changed 
Into a state university but we do 
believe that a man should not be bar- 
red, simply because he is a farmer, 
from acquiring that general knowledge 
and culture which allow him to stand 
on a level with those engaged in other 
professions. The days of the old 
regime are past and It is hoped that In 
the future those vested with authority 
will be able to appreciate this fact. 



CHANOK or LOCATION 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at 51 Pleasant St. 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses .Accurately R^laced 

Fine Watch Repairing Promptly and 
Skilfully Done 




Satisfaction Guaranteed 



PARKS. 



Flowers for all occcasions. 

Mail or telephone orders given 
prompt attention. 

239 Mill SI, Nortbaipton 

STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUQS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



It's a good thing not to worry about 
your pedal apparel, its correct, style 
comfort or durability. 

Buy your shoes from 

Thii Shop mu The Style 

" Walk Over, " Haywood Shoes, 

*3.50, f400, I500 



Bolles " Special, " Stetson Shoes, 
$5.00 to $8.00 

REPAIRING DEPARTMENT 

E.M. BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Next to Corner Drug Store. 



Angier, '13. 



Clark, '13. 



We have a full line of Banners, Post 
Cards, College .Songs, Seal Papers, Foun 
tain Pens, Candy, Tonic and Student 
Supplies. 

COLLEGE STORE 

BASEMENT OF NO. COLLEGE 



Eldridge, '14. 



Tarbell, '14. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



EWELL'5 



^^^rpfn'izr St Morehouse, 

PRIf^TERS. 



No I, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mem. 



The Annapolis honor system Is 
undergoing a severe test. Midship- 
men must not spend more than a dol- 
lar a month for candy, and sweets 
must not be sent to them. If any 
misguided friend breaks through the 
restriction, It Is assumed that the 
middy will buy the sweets or turn them 
over to his superior officers. 



H. E. KINSMAN, 

College Pbotograpber 

NASH BLOCK, MAIN ST., 
AMHERST, MASS. 

High-grade artistic work. Perfect satisfaction guaranteed. 

Studio newly equipped with large sky light 

and special lense for large 

groups. 

All styles the latest. Fine picture framing 



COLLEGE NOTES 

<' I take great delight In agreeing 
with the Governor," 



The Stockbridge club meets tonight 
at 6-45 In Room G South college. 
The subject for the evening is "Grain 

Senior class election will be held Production in I^assachuselts." Three 

different members will discuss the 
following three phases of the subject 
taking It up from the standpoint of the 
general farmer, the stock grower, and 



after Assembly, Wednesday. 

W. R. Moody of Northfield. was 
the speaker at Sunday Chapel. 

Q. T. V. held an informal smoker ! the poultry raiser, 
in the fraternity rooms, Friday evening. I At the mass meeting held after 

The game with IWI. I. T. scheduled Wednesday's assembly, H. C. Walker 
for last night at ihe Arena has been '12, president of the senate, explained 
cancelled. i ^^V ^^^- 22d was not made a full hol- 

iday here at college. He said that 



"The score Is tied, ^l 
that the toss of a coin will 



is believed 
decide the 



winner. 



I I I 



The Washington's birthday Informal 
was the largest ever held In the history 
of the college. 



the trustees thought that It would be 
more advantageous to ti.e students If 
only a half holiday was given on Pat- 
riot's, Columbus and Washington's 
birthday, but to make up for this the 
Friday and Saturday following Thanks- 



Oi'ing to poor ice the Dartmouth , giving would be holidays and so give 



the men tne oppertunity to have sev- 
eral days at home when they most 
desire them. It seems that we are 
getting a square deal. 



NOTICE 

Board at the Dining Hall for the 
second three months' period will be 
audited March 1st. Men wishing to 
receive a rebate should make sure that 
all board is paid up to date by March 
1st. Attention Is called to the rules 
in the front of the Dining Hall account 
books of the men : 

"Board is audited at the close of 
each three months* period beginning 
with Sept. 1st. To the audited rate 
of any quarter five per cent shall be 
added to niake the rate for the follow- 
ing quarter. But no rebates shall be 
giveii to any member whose board Is 
in arrears at time of auditing." 

Rebate on board is given only to 
regular students of the college. 



management cancelled tne hockey 
match scheduled for Saturday. 

C. A. Butman of the department of 
Physics gave a talk before the Topics 
club at Amherst college last Tuesday 
evening. 

At a recent meeting the freshman 
class elected M. J. Clough as track 
manager and M. N. Goodwin baseball 
manager. 

Sophomore elections held last week 
resulted as follows: manager of class 
treck. L. Ernest Smith; manager of 
class hockey, Newton H. Dearlng. 

An election was held after Wednes- 
day assembly to fill the position of 
assistant manager of tennis. The 
candidates were Foster and Bokelund ; 
Bokelund was elected. 

The speaker at last Wednesday's 
assembly was Henry Sterling of 
Boston. He is a member of a com- 
mittee appointed by the Massachusetts 
Legislature to look Into the labor 
conditions. 

During the last few weeks, the fol- 
lowing men have entered the freshman 
class; Russell C. Harrington of 
Taunton, Benjamin Vener of Boston, 
H. C. Williams of Topsfield and 
Waldo Cleveland of Baldwinsville. 

Tuesday noon there was consider- 
able excitement on Pleasant street 
when a fire started in the Kappa Sigma 
house. By quick work It was soon 
extinguished, the only damage being 
to the room where the fire originated. 

There are two not far distant events 
which cause the midnight oil and elec- 
tricity to be In great demand ; the 
Signal competition closes Feb. 29, 
and the first "Dean's Saturday" is to 
be March 2. May very few have 
reason to remember it as "black 
Saturday." 

The wind and Ice last Thursday 
caused both the just and the unjust to 
stand on very slippery footing. Com- 
ing out of chapel, half of the college ' 'og'cal Survey. 

laughed watching the other half fall '04.— Howard M. White has just 
down, The "feather weights," when , bought a fine established fruit farm at 
they left the walks, were literally | Hilton, Monroe Co., N. Y., in the 
blown along on the Ice by the wind. \ heart of the western New York apple 



ALUMNI NOTES 

•95._Prof, E. A. White of the 
Florlcultural Department has an article 
in the current number of the New Eng- 
land Magazine on "New England Con- 
servatory Plants as they grow In 
Bermuda." 

'02. — A. L. Dacy has been made 
associate horticulturist of the West 
Virginia Experiment Station, and has 
received a substantial increase in sal- 
ary along with his promotion. He Is 
the author of Bulletin 136 from the 
West Virginia Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station, entitled "The apple 
orchard from planting to bearing age. " 

'03. — A circular on "Bee Keeping 
In Porto Rico," under the authorship 
of W. V. Tower, has just been pub- 
lished by the Porto Rico Station. 

'04. — F. F. Henshaw is part author 
of "Surface Water Supply of the 
North Pacific Coast," a bulletin just 
published by the United States Geo- 



SOIL ROBBERY 

" Uncle Henry" Wallace, who presided over the great Conservation 
Congress at Kansas City last September, said that as a nation we had 
been "soil miners," mining and selling the surplus of availahle fertility 
which had been stored up for ages, but that now we were ".soil rolibers." 
The surplus of available fertility of enormous tracts of tillage land has 
been mined on an extensive scale, so that in many sections the product 
of the land l>as been reduced to the 'natural yield." that is. a yield based 
on the amount of plant food rendered available from year to year, which 
in turn is measured by the weakest link in the chain of fertility It can- 
not be foretold in what hour or in what year the weakest link will he dis- 
closed, but it is there and it may mean great lo.ss. 

To preach dependence on potential soil fertility or the weakest link 
is not only \>oot economy and hmi ethiis, but it is unscientific, in that it 
will lead to crop bankruptcy and commercial loss Kathci pi each in the 
growing of any crop, restoration of the plant food which it has removed, 
not only as crop insurance, but to maintain the integrity of the soil 
Frof. Stockbridge taught: 

" If the soil machine is a good one so much the better: if it has a 
balance of crop producing power to its credit, let us preserve that balance 
for an emergency. Let us not draw on it for present needs." 

"STUDY THE PLANT FOOD PRDBIEM " 



BOWKEB 



Fertilizer Company 

43 Chatham St. Boston 



Kuppenheimefs 
Fine Clothes 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOM TAILORING A SPECIALTY 

Thomas Hbmenway, '12, M. A. C. Representative 



YOU WILL FIND 
A FULL LINE 



OF 



F. A. SHEPARD 

MEN'S STORE 




DUDLEY 

OUTFITTER IN 

Fine Athletic Goods 

FOR EVERY SPORT 



11 



I'i'l 

'I 



■' 



'» . 




TOBAOOO 



AT- 



The College Drug Store 




•The 5tST In Tne World' 
Write for cataloge. 



Glmrlii!; H. Duiy 

HANOVER, - - N. H. 






II 

4 



iJi 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 27, 1913. 



.f^^«'^%*'-vNd«^.%.'^5t'^666666f*'^^ 



GOODS FOR MEN. 



C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 






English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 



^^.. 



■.•^it,^^hi^e:i^>^^^''''''''''''^^Sh^ 



Highest Grade Roses 

We are offering to our local patrons, selection from our large 
stock of finest Roses, especially grown for the Nkw York and Hoston 
I' I OWKR MARKEre. 

THE MONTGOMERY CO., Inc., 

HADLEIY, MASS. 

TELEPHONES. 

AmherBt. t96-R. 
Northampton. 660. 



GENUINE • THOMAS - PHOSPHATE • POWDER 

Basic Slag Meali 

Orows Big Red Apples and Other Fruits 

TROPHIES WON BY USERS OF 

Qenuine - Thomas - Phosphate - Powder 

.— A r T H I -— 

GREAT NEW ENGLAND FRUIT SHOW 
• Held at Boston, Mass., October 33-28, 191 1 

International Apple Shippers' Association's Cup for l<<'st I ommercial l.x- 

hibit of I'ackcfl 1 ruil Won \>y ( oiiytr s I .inn. (.. A. Drtw, Mgr., toon. 
Silver Cup for Best Display of Baldwin Apples otTered by (iuvernor 

Foss. of .Mas.s.«clHi>ctts. W ou \>y I. K. Winsor, Rhode Island 
Silver Shield for Best Hxhihit of Rhode Island (ireeninics offered liy 

(loveriior i'olhier, of KIkmIc Island. Won \>y T. K WinNor. Khodi- Island 
$2S.OO Cash for Best Barrel of King Apples offered l.y W. it li Don-las 

Conipanv. of Connetticut. Won by Klijah Rogers, Connecticut 
First Prize for Best Barrel of Rhode Island (ireeninjcs. Won by Klijah 

Rogers, t Onnrcticut. 
First Prize $S0.0O Best 5 Boxes of Apples. Any Variety or Varieties. 

Won l>y Conyer's Kami. ('.. A. Drew, Manager, Cotinei ticnt. 
Second Prize $25.00 for Best 5 Boxes of Apples. Any Variety or 

Varieties. Won by N. S Winsor, Rhode Island. 
First Prize Best Box Exhibit of Apples. Won by Conyer's Farm, t.. A. 

Drew, Managrr. Connecticiii 
Silver Hedal Best Packed F.xhibit of Apples. Won by Conyer's Farm. 

(.. A I)t<\v. Manager, i onnn licnl. 
First Prize Best Box of Rhode island (Ireeninjcs. Won by I K. 

Winsor, Rliode Island. 
Sweepstakes for Best Box of Apples Packed for Market $7.S.OO. W on 

by t:onyer'.s Farm, (".. A. Dri-w, Manager, Connrctiiut. 
Berlin Prize $25.00 Cash and Silver Medal. Won by Conyers i aim, 

<; A. Drew, Manajjt-r, Connecticut. 
Connecticut Pomolojficai Society -Silver Medal for Best Table of Fruit. 

Won by ' onver's Ilarni, (".. A. Drew, (General Manager, C f)nntctiriit. 
Massachusetts ARricultural College SweepsUkes for Winning Largest 

Number of Prizes. Won by Conyer's Farm, (i. A. Drew, Manager. Conn. 

Niiiiieroiis (HUfT I'ri/.s. \V..n b\ ah..v«- and otiier users (ienuiin- TlH.n.as Ph'.svlu.tp I'l.w-lf r 

Why Not Put YOUR Fruit in the Prize Winning Class by Purchasing 

GENUINE THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

Key-Tree Brand, From 

THE COB - MORTZMBR COMPANY 

51 Chambers Street, New York City 

0,„ Hookirt,- Tp t..-IUte l-ru,t(;rowins with Tl.on,a« Ph..M.hate l',-«H . ' , 

mention The College Mgnal. 



belt, and is moving there with his 
family. 

'05.- -G. H. Allen is now associated 
with State Forester Frank W. Rane. 
His work has been in connection with 
forest fire wardens and also with the 
chestnut tree blight. His address is 
6 Beacon St., Boston. 

'07 — F. C, Peters is now engaged 
very successfully in tree surgery. His 
main office is in Philadelphia with a 
branch office in Lenox. 

'11.— Take notice— Get busy on 
that class letter. Don't wait until 
tomorrow — send it in today. L. M. 
Johnson, Sec. Box 517, Newtown, 
Conn. 

Edward Higgins, ex-'14, 's visiting 
college for a few days. He is on hU 
way to the Sackatchewan wheat dis- 
trict. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE NOTES 

The Young Woman's Christian 
association of one university in the 
west announced that it will serve tea 
during examination week. 

M. A. C. is not the only college 
worKing for new buildings. Harvard 
is making a great effort to gain the 
nscessary funds for a hospital in con- 
nection with the medical school. 

Cornell will drop more students this 
year as a result of the midwinter exam- 
inations than last. There are 81 
failures in the various coHeges, the 
college of civil engineering excepted, 
as against a toial of 88 last year in all 
colleges. T he civil engineering depart- 
ment has not vet settled all its cases, 
but it is understood many more men 
will be dropped than in any other col- 
lege. Thirty students were dropped 
fr^m the mechanical engineers, 23 
from arts and sciences and 18 from 
agriculture. Everyone passed in tht 
Cillege of veterinary medicine. 



I 

and am interested in NEW ENGLAND 
ACiRI CULTURE and have devoted a 
Special Department of my business to 
the handling of FARMS and COUN- 
TRY HOMES with F. 1'. MARSTON, 
N. H '81, as .Manager. Correspondence 
solicited. Send for RAYMOND'S RED 
LETTER. Farm and Country Home 
Edition. Reliable agents wanted. 

T. H. RAYMOND 



Central Square, 



Cambridge, Ma.s.s. 



E.B OIGKINSOND. D.S. 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass, 

Office liouas: 



If you wnnt tti lie 

MOI.IO WITH THK OIKI.M 

jrou must havi- your riot lies iire»!ii'il and cleaned 

AT HTSTHlJi'S 



11 Amity xt. 



.MiiMM^n 8t<ire 



Prenslng biiiI CMcnntiiK a »|»< cUlty 

Mont ItbenI Uck«l ayistcin In town 



it frep 



FOR FARMS ! 

Big, Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building Ix)ts 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W. R BROWN 

Savings Bank Bl'k, 

Amherst. ♦ Mass 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

///''/i-Grat/t Colic Of Work 



LAUNDRY 



Shirts. 
Collar.s, 
Cuff.s, - 
Plain wash. 
Same, rough dry. 



10-15C 

2C 

40c per do/. 
250 per do7 



Ralph R. Parker, agent, C. .S. C. House, 
H5 rieasant St. 

Francis S. Madi.son, agent for 1915 and 
short course. Vet. Lab. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 
Fred S. Merrill, agent, C. S. C. House 

85 I'leasant St. 
Put full name and address on laundry 




THIS CATAL06UE 
SHOULD BE 
IN THE HANDS 
OF EVERY ONE 
INTERESTED IN 

ATHLETIC SPORT 

.MMlltfl Frt-e 

Kxperienced user^ 1 

that Wright 

v Ditson articles 
are .luperior. The\ ^ 
are rle^igned anJ I 
i)i.irlc bv men whi> 
;,ii- rxp*rts and whn 
linow n<iw to iiwthe 
Roods themselves 



Complete iiquipment for Lawn 
Tennis, Base Ball, (Jolf, Cricket, 
Track and Field Sports, Basket 
Bali, Foot Bali and Lawn (lames 



Wriuht vt Ditson 
Lawn I ennis Guide 
10 Onts 



Wright & I>it!*on 
Ba^e Hall (iuide 
10 Cents 



To farr time addms our nearest store 


WRIGHT & 


DITSON 


344 WashinKton 5t 


, Boston, riass. 


NEW YOBK CHICAQO 

22 W^iiren .">t. iig N. Wabash Ave. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

359 Market St. 

PROVIDENCE. R. i. CAMBRIIMJE, MASS. 

76 Weybo.Met St. Harvard Square 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 27, 19 12. 




As I am directly connected with a WholeHale 
Hou»e, I can 

SAVE YOr MONEY ON CLOTHES 

will be |ileiiHt'>l to show Bainplea and ittyleaof 
Winter .Suit.-. hhiI Ovcrcuau. 

H. It WIIITK, ItMA. Hunts Block 
Up One KIlRht 




THE 

SMOOTHEST 



Coiiii. Valley SI. Ry. Lines 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations,vio1ets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall, These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 




A good frlrnd is the friendly 

coach ^• ho comes and brings 
a tin < f Velvet and helps you 
in tlie i.i k o( time. 
Vilvrl it a icm liial Ic tobacco — in 
thete lii.riy-up tla)t it \\ % it* time. 
1 ak't l%«o y .V.I (>i mellowirg 
to lake oi.'t a!l li^nhnr't and 
'Lite"— niakfth'- tartericii and 
quality "tmoc'.H." 
Tliat's *»' y Velvet it a Kelp- 
lul iinok " — n<-vet iriil Irt — 
jii5t driiv' r« llie maximum cf 
pipe pI'-KUr"^- - 1' at We're all 
after. At all dealers. 

SPAV riN-: & KZr.RICK 



'•'^m 



W 



Fu!» Tv/o 
Ounc.^ Tins 



One ounce bags, G cen a, con* 
voniert i-^t elc^arctt 3 • 3Uera, 




WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

%1 Main St., Masonic BIdg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 

In so far as our benefits are mutual. 

THE AMHERST CAS COMPANY 

Everything Ellectrical 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from r A. M. to 4 A. M. 



Scbool and College PDotograpDers • . 




UDIO 



LQOALLY: 5* Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadlcy, Mass. 

Mai.v Office: These .Studios offer the best skilled 

1546-1548 Broadway, ^rt'sts and most complete 

New York City equipment obtainable 



m.d.oilman. c.A.MorrET. 

TELEPHONE 1079-3. 

GILMAN and M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 

CONFECTIONERY. 

f07toSll Maim Strkbt. 

WoxcESTSA, Mass. 



- ri-AM II I 11 NG, lel^i-hone J9— 4. 

GAS Fll I IN'.. I INNINO. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PLUMBERS. 

Specialty of Kepairinfi 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Winuows, 
Lead Li<iHTS, &c. 
iCUftonAve., AMHERST, MASS. 



I? 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 27, 1912. 



PI. J. Lapofie, IDC. 



Proprietors of 



POrO-UYEBY-HOBSE 



Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 



Tel. 183. 




ASK YOUR 

STATIONER 

FOR 



Ward's Fountain I'ens. Fine Papers 
and Knvelopes, Students' Supplies. 
Send for samples o( Kngraved Invita- 
tion*, Class and Fraternity Paper, 
Banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, etc. 



SAMUEL WARD CO. 



WORD'S 



5763 Franklin Street 
BOSTON 



All Styles 0/ 



SWEATERS 
AND JERSEYS 



TRADE «»^^_ 




MARK 



'^^yQu7^ 



Compute Line of 



Athletic Goods 
and BANNERS 



HE 



Massachusetts Agricultural Gollese 



Trains men for attractive positions in vocations 
that are not overcrowded. 

Tuition is free to residents of Massachusetts. 

Necessary expenses are moderate. 

A CATALOG WILL BE SENT ON REQUEST 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Thirteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Fourteen Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club, 

Dramatic Society, 

Debating Society, 

Public Speaking Cour>cil, 



Vlolli, Banjo, Mandolin, and Giltar Strings 

LKNiS UKINUINO 

Fu/l lint of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 

PROMINENCE 

Is given here to the fact that we take 

special care in the posing of 

subjects in order to bring 

out all the good 

features. 

Light and shade is skilfully diffused 

This and the excellent finish makes 

our I'HOTOGRAPHS masterpieces 

of reproductive art. 

SHILURE'S STUDIO. 

142 Main St, Northaiptoo 



H. C. Walker, President 

Geo. H. Chapman, Secretary 

W. J. Covin, Manager 

R. J. Borden. Manager 

R. T. Beers, Manager 

H H. Wood, Manager 

S. M. Jordan, Manager 

O. G. Anderson, Manager 

E. S. Clark, Manager 

F. S. Madison, President 

L. S. Caldwell. President 

J, D. French, Manager 

W. J. Weaver. President 

G. W. Ells, Secretary 

Geo. Zabriskie, Manager 

J. M. Heald, President 

T. J. Moreau, President 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 



17 South College 



n/hen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CI-EIAN&ING. 

PRESSING. 

REPAIRING. 

Qnlrkrst fHtrrlw*. Be^t Work, L.owe*t FrI..- 

All woik carefully done. Work called for and 
delivered, (ients' overcoats, suits, uant* and 
coats, ladies' hne linen suit* a specialty. 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rear Nash Bi'k. Amhertt. 



Tel. No. 34J 4 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



If you are getting the 

THE MOST FOB TOUR MONET 

then you are eating at the 

O. K., NEXT TO POST OFFICE 

J. W. KOU»E, Prop. 

Have you tried our as-cent Dinners? 
If not, why not? 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Ftne Repairing a Specialty 

Custom Work 

Holland's Block. Phoenix Row 



Telephone Connection 

TAILOR AND PRESSER 

Fall and Winter Suits 

Chevrons and .Stripes 

Put on Military Suits 

Full Dress Suits to Rent 

Gents' Furnishings 



CARS 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

JACOB Reed's Sons, 

Makers of " Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Leave AOQIE COLLEOE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AOCIIE COl.- 
LEUE at 7 and 37 mlm. past each 
HOUR. 

SpMlMl Car* at RmmimM* RatM 

AIHERSI t SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 



THE NEW ENGUND NEWSPAPER 

All the news and the Truth 
about it, in the :: 

Sprlngfleld Republican 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 
News fully reported. 

BEST SPORTING PAGES 

The Weekly Republican will be sent 

free for one month to anyone 

wishing to try it. 

Daily, $8. Sunday, %3- iVetkly, $r. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

MAS5^ ', ^^ .OSETTS AGRICULTURAL. COLLEGE 



' 
4 



V. » 



Vol. XXII. 



iuSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, March 5, 1912. 



No. 20 



COMPETITION CLOSES 



RIFLE TEAM 



HOCKEY RESUME 



New Members Admitted to the Signal 
Board. 

The competition for membership on 
the Signal Boai-d came to an end last 
Thursday, after five months of strenu- 
ous work by the various competi- 
tiors. As a result, the following men 
were elected to the board to succeed 
the retiring members. Editoral De- 
partment : 1913, Harry W. Allen of 
West Pelham, and Fred D. Griggs of 
Chicopee Falls. 1914. Harold C. 
Biaclc of Falmouth and Ervlne F. 
Parker of Paquonock, Gonn. 1915. 
J. Albert Price of New York City, 
and Elbert F. Moore of Waltham. 
Business Department : 1914, Ernest 
F. Upton of Salem. 1915, Maxwell 
B. Sabin of Leominster. 

The present board will go out of 
office on March 15, and the work of 
publishing the paper will be taicen up 
by the new board at once. 

STUDENT COMMITTEE AT 
BOSTON. 

The student committee appointed 
to represent the students in regard to 
the pending appropriation for a new 
dormitory appeared before tne Com- 
mittee on Agriculture, at the State 
House Friday afternoon. 

H. C, Walker was the first speaker 
and discussed the question from the 
standpoint of student expenses. He 
also showed that the erection of such a 
building as has been planned would be 
a paying Investment. R. R. Parker 
followed and dweh upon the existing 
conditions which would make a dormi- 
tory a benefit to the students for other 
reasons than to reduce expense, and 
would render the college work more 
efficient. J. T. Moreau closed the 
discussion, reinforcing the points 
already made and showed that student 
life is made more profitable and enjoy- 
able by the social benefits incident 
upon a closer union of the students. 

After the hearing an audience was 
obtained with the Governor at the sug- 
gestion of one of the members of the 
Committee on Agriculture, and the 
student sentiment or. the question was 
expressed to him. 



Record Score Made Against Norwich. Team Closes Successful Season with 
Review of the Season. but One Defeat. 



A large number gathered by the 
running track Thursday morning to see 
a ten-lap race between Samson and 
Brewer 1913. Brewer had the lead 
for six laps; then Samson forged ahead 
and held the advantage until the end. 
The race was declared a tie, as 
Brewer shot under Samson's arm at 
the very end." Samson, however, 
declares he slowed up because he did 
not know where the finish line was 
located. 



The M. A. C. rifle team has long 
upheld a reputation for good rifle 
shooting. Last year the team under 
the leadership of A. H. Sharpe, the 
captain and coaching of Sergeant 
Wahlstrom, one of the best shots In 
the army, came out in the second 
place in the Inter-collegiate Indoor 
Rifle Shooting League. Iowa was the 
winner of the season. 

During the matches of the season 
our team made a new inter-colleglate 
Indoor record of 1 ,915 and of a possi- 
ble 2,000 and Captain Sharpe made a 
new individual record of 197 out of a 
possible 200. On May second the 
team, for the second time In two years 
won the Intercollegiate Indood Cham- 
pionship shoot. The team also won 
the Inter-coUeglate Outdoor Champion- 
ship held on June 1 6th at the Bay 
State Range in Wakefield. In this 
match Stevenson by making a perfect 
score beoke the intercollegiate Individ- 
ual record of forty-nine for the 500- 
yearif range held by Captain Sharpe. 
This year although we lost Sharpe 
and four other members of the team 
by graduation the team has given 
promise of eclipsing the record of last 
year. With two more matches to 
shoot the team has the recond of win- 
ning every match shot off and being 
tied for first place for the champion- 
ship of the Eastern league with Prince- 
ton. 

The first shoot of the year was 
against the University of Pennsylvania. 
Although there were but five of last 
year's team shooting the men averaged 
181.5 as against 176.1 scored in the 
first match of the previous year. This 
seemed to promise great things and 
showed that the team had not lost 
sight of the championship goal. The 
score for this match was 931. The 
second match was with the college of 
veterinary surgeons at Washington, D. 
C. The score here was a little better 
than the first, being 933. The next 
college which opposed us was Delaware 
college when our score was 450. 
This was a more natural gait for our 
team. The same story Is true in all 
the matches. Princeton and M.AC, 
stood alone with no defeats until the 
last match when the former went 
down to defeat at the hands of Har- 
vard. 

The - last match shot by the rifle 
team, against Norwich Uulverslty, 
Tuesday, resulted In the highest team 
score made this season on the eastern 
division of the intercollegiate rifle 



TRACK TEAM AT HARTFORD 



At the close of the 1910 II season 
every body was talking about the 
hockey team. We had had one of 
the best college teams In the country, 
one that had beaten teams of the 
calibre of those of Yale and Williams, 
Springfield Training school, Trinity 
and Amherst. We had been beaten 
only by Dartmouth and Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology and these two 
teams finished second and third re- 
spectively In the race for the college 
championship of the country. 

We were spoken of as the coming 
champions and our hockey team was 
placed m the same class as our rifle 
team. That meant there was no team 
In the country that could beat us. 
Our star men Jones, Hutchinson and 
Wooley were all given write-ups by the 
sporting editors of the east. These 
editors said without a doubt we had 
the best small college aggregation in 
tne country. And the remarkable 
feature of it was that of the seven 
men composing the team, four of them, 
an-* stars at that, were freshmen. 

Of -ourse this excellent record at- 
tracted a great deal of attention and 
Its influence was shown by the pres- 
ence of a number of good hockey 
players in this year's entering class. 
Among those were men who had haa 
good offer to go to larger colleges but 
who prefered to come here because 
of an exceptional record. 

This year, during the athletic lull 
between the football and the hockey 
seasons, of course we were all 
talking over the prospect of the 
team. There was a unanimous opin- 
ion that we had In college the "mak- 
ings" of the best college team in the 
country. We had lost by graduation 
only one man, of last year's team. 
Captain Adams. For his position 
there were five or six good candidates. 
Among these was MacDonald the crack 
Melrose High player and a number of 
less reputed men. With this single 
exception the team that represented 
us last year was in tact. 

At last the cold weather set in and 
th-? rink was constructed on the north 
end of the pond. Then the true class 
of the team began to be shown, al- 
though they had been holding Indoor 
practice In the Drill hall for over a 
month. The practice had been going 
on for about two weeks and the team 
was rapidly rounding Into form, when 
the first faculty interference came. 
This was In the guise of a notice to 
the four mainstays of the team, that 



Relay Team Loses to Brown In Fastest 
Race of the Meet. Cald- 
well the Star. 



[ContlniMdMpMe2] 



ICoaHaiMd on pac* 21 



Massachusetts was defeated by the 
Brown relay team at Hartford State 
Armory meet, Friday, in the fastest 
time of the evening. Caldwell '13 
and Clapp '12 finished second and 
third In the 300 yard dash open. 
Caldwell also placed second in the 
75 yard intercollegiate and third In the 
600 yard open. 

Caldwell got a good start In his heat 
In the 75 yard and gradually pulled 
away from the bunch. Coming fast 
i from the 50 yard mark he broke the 
tape In 8 2-5 seconds, beating Brigham 
of Yale by 3 feet. Clapp and Nlcolet 
placed third in their heats thus falling 
to,qualify. Nlcolet lead to the 50 yard 
mark but lost in the last 25 yards. 

In the final heat Caldwell was beaten 
to the tape by inches by Burns of 
Brown, Brigham of Yale taking third. 
The time was 8 2-5 seconds. 

In the 300 yard open the Aggies 

finished in two, three, four, five and 

six order. Caldwell finished second. 

Marble of Brown leading him to the 

tape. Captain Clapp took third, while 

Nlcolet, Davlcs, Barber and Barnes 

finished In a bunch, the rest of the 

field trailing. The time was 36 1-5. 

Caldwell trailed the bunch In the 

600 yard open, and on the last lap 

pushed his way through the field to 

third place by a pretty finish sprint. 

Bonsll of Columbia won In I minute 

2 1 seconds, with Mahoney of Brown 

second. 

Clapp led off In the relay against 
Miles of Brown. He got a pretty start 
and held his advantage for one lap. 
Miles passed him on the second but 
was not able to pull away. Mahoney 
of Brown took up the race with a two 
yard lead over Whitney. Showing 
the speed that had landed him In sec- 
ond place m the 600, he gradually 
drew away from our man. giving the 
tag to Hall with 20 yard sto spare. 
Hall increased this lead over Clark to 
40 yards. Caldwell taking up the race 
against Burns. The distance was too 
great to be made up and Brown won 
with 30 yards to spare In 3.44 2-5. 

Southwlck '12 and Baker '13 were 
entered In the mile. Southwlck went 
the first three laps in fifth place, and 
then moved up to third. The pace 
was very fast and the first four men 
pulled rapidly away from the bunch. 
On the last lap Cook of Brown proved 
to have the faster sprint and barely 
nosed Ben out at the tape for third 
place. Southwlck ran a heady race 
and deserves all the credit In the world 



I II 




The College Sifnal, Tuesday, March 5, 191 2. 



The College Signal, Tuesday. March 5, 1912 



for the plucky race that he put up 
against some of the fastest milers in 
Intercollegiate circles. Taber won in 
4.37 2-5, remarkable time for the 
conditions and floor. Ben should show 
to good advantage in the triangular 
meet at Worcester in May. 

The meet drew an enthusiastic 
crowd of 5000 and each event was 
run off in a manner that was greatly 
appreciated by t)oth contestants and 
spectators. Owing to the smooth floor 
and the rule forbidding spikes, the 
times of the various events were com- 
paratively slow, but ware remarkable 
under the circumstances. As in the 
past the meet proved one of the most 
enjoyable from the Aggie stand point 
and marks the close of our indoor 
season. 

Amherst's win over Columbia at 
Hartford, Friday shows the class of 
the Aggie team when they took her 
measure at the Columbia meet. 
Columbia was beaten out for second 
place by inches in the intercollegiate 
indoor championship relay by Syracuse. 
Massachusetts should make a fine 
showing in the outdoor relay carnival 
at Philadelphia in the spring. 

RESUME OF THE HOCKEY 
SEASON. 

[ContlmMd frnm p«c« I ] 

they were below passing in one or 
more subjectsof their current work and 
were, therefore, ineligible to represent 
the college in any way. This came 
as somewhat of a shock to say the 
least, and it hurt all the more as the 
Boston Athletic Associction game in 
the Arena, was only a week off. Oi 
course this necessitated some changes 
in the line-up of the team and for a 
few days the team work was somewhat 
demoralized. Captain Peckham, how- 
ever, put forth ail his energies and 
when the team journeyed to Boston, on 
December 6th it was not in as bad 
condition as was expected. it was 
there that some of the boys were some- 
what unused to skates and hardly 
knew what a puck looked like, but 
these things were no hinderance to the 
spirit of the team. They all had their 
minds made up to go and play the 
best they could and try and uphold the 
name of Old Aggie. We all know 
how that game came out. We were 
beaten by a better team, every man 
of which was a star. We do n'^t 
blame the team in the least, but how 
often we have heard the desire ex- 
pressed, that we might have another 
game with B. A. A. when we had our 
regular team. In this game we were 
represented by Capt. Peckham, Sanct- 
uary, Ackerman and Needham of the 
regular team. 

The second game of the season, 
with Springfield Training School 
resulted in an 8-2 score for M. A. C. 
In this game we were again handi- 
capped by the absence of Needham 
who was in difficulties at the Dean's 
office. The game was played on the 
home rink and was fast and rough. 



The stars for Aggie were "Bill" Sanct- 
uary and Jones, for Springfield Train- , 
ing School, Bowers excelled. 

Our third game was with Rensselaer I 
Polytechnic Institute and was played I 
In Troy, N. Y., January 6th. The i 
game was very fast though played un- 
der difficulties. The day was so cold j 
that several of the players had their { 
hands and feet frost bitten though they 
were active all the time. But one 
goal was scored in the first half. This 
was made by Jones who had at last re- 
turned to the game. In the second 
half three more goals were made by 
M. A. C. while Renssalaer was un- 
able to shove the puck by goal-tender 
Ackerman for a single tally. This 
game was productive of the best team 
work of the season up to that date al- 
though the absence of Hutchinson and 
Needham was greatly felt. The score 
was 4-0 but it does not give any Idea 
of the comparative merits of the two 
teams, as the playing was continually 
in R. P. I's territory, and a large 
score was prevented only by the great- 
est of luck. 

The next game of our schedule was 
with Williams. It was somewhat of a 
disappointment because it had to be 
called while the score was still tied in 
order to let our fellows catch a train. 
The team did some good work at the 
latter part of the game but as a whole 
lacked the dash and vigor which so 
characterizes it. 

Trinity was the next team to meet 
defeat at our hands being beaten 9-1 . 
the team work was greatly Improved 
by the presence of Jones and Hutchin- 
son who had succeeded in clearing 
themselves with the Dean, 

The next game played was with 
Wast Point and this was perhaps the 
best game of the season for we beat 
what was reported to be an exceptional 
team by a score of 7-1. In this game 
we were represented by the full team 
for the first time this year. This one 
game is the only one by which we can 
judge the team. 

The season closed with two games 
played on Pratt rink. The first one 
was with Amherst College and resulted 
in a score of 3-0 for M. A. C. There 
was some good hockey shown in this 
game by the Aggie men. Amherst 
played throughout a defensive game. 
M. I. T, was next defeated by a score 
of 4-1. This game was a farce, how- 
ever, the ice was in abominable con- 
dition and it was a case of the team 
with the best luck winning. 

What would have, undoubtedly, 
been a most successful season was 
marred by the faculty rulings. In 
nearly all of the games one or more of 
the men were unable to play. The 
faculty up to this time has been unable 
to follow any definite line of action. 
As a result of these rulings the new 
"Eligibility Rule" has been adopted 
which we all hope will act kindly for us 
next winter when we shall have another 
season with the majority of the team 
Intact. 



UP-TO-DATE 



* COLLEGE FOOTWEAR * 



Elite Shoes, 
Swell Shod Shoes, 
Pumps the fit, - 



$3.50 to $5.00 

- $5.00 and $6.cx5 

$4.00 



EXPERT REPAIRING 



PAGE'S Shoe Store, 



BETWEEN THE BANKS 



HARRISON'S NURSERIES... 

Berlin, Maryland. 
Have over two thousand acres in Nursery Stock. 
They offer a book on 

HOW TO GROW AND MARKET FRDIT 

For 50 cents. 

All prospective buyers are invited to visit the 

Nursery. 

They are the largest growers of fruit trees in 

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BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, ud PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Be sure you load your Kodak or 
any Camera with the genuine 

Eastman Film 



ICOD^^ICIS 



Yictor lalkiDO macHines 



DEUEL'S 

DRUG STORE 




PHOTOGRAPHER 

The best workmanship. 

The latest styles. 

Reasonable prices 

Lincoln Building, Amberit, Mam. 



The Prospect House 



-PERRY'S- 



The place to eat after the game. 
Attractive tables and rooms. Excel- 
lent service. Catering a specialty. 



MRS. E. e:. perry 



There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 

or 

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HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St 



Northampton, Mass. 



jtE. N. PARISEAU.^ 

Barber j^ Shop 

RAZORS HONED 



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Jewelers and Silversmiths, 

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Rings, Charms.'. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE NOTES 

Columbia has twenty games on Its 
1912 baseball schedule. 

As a result of a strike of the engine- 
room force at the University of Michi- 
gan, 22 students find themselves In 
permanent jobs. 

The Cornell Athletic Association has 
a deficit of over $6,000 which has 
been made up from the sinking fund. 
A decrease in football profits is blamed 
for the deficit. The gridiron sport 
showing a profit of only $5,000. The 
crews and track team went badly in 
the hole while baseball barely made 
both ends meet. 




M. E. ANDREWS 

Succeaaor to 3. S. HYDE 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 



Fine Repairlnf a Specialty 

7 Pleasant St Phillips Block 

Amherst, Mass. 



THE STORE 

FOR 

ETTER 
CLOTHES! 



Barsalotti & Gentoso 

Clgara Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresh Candy 

ke Cream, Fruit, Soda, Etc. 

The Right Good^ at the Right Ptice» 

Open till II o'cl<Kk KVKKY night 
CoriM-r Amity nad flrMitanl MrM'tB 



Clothing Heavily Reduced 

There are plenty of Clothes Sales these days, hul there's as much difference 
between them and their methods, and what they really mean-and what you get for 
your money— as there is between the Clothes themselves. We are now holding our 

Semi-Annual Clearance Sale 

which means that 200 Men's Higli tirade Suits and 120 Men's Overcoats will be 

sold at 1-5 off from regular price 
30 Suits and Overcoats at |i6oo iH Suits and Overcoats at #14 4° 

All Suits and Overcoats at the same discount 
It's the buying opportunity of the year. Don't miss it 

SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



The WoRTlIY.rQ^'^^'-'- ^"'^ i-^on^RD 




FRANK H. DANFORTII. Mem. 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 



S] 



Mikirt 

•f 



A OOWNS 

To the American Colleges f nun the At- 

Amherst Corner \n RalhHkellar. |?;;'S,',';;»'^ ''«•«- ^'-» ^-»'-»« * 



M. B. MAORATH &SON 

Passenger and 



Toefil Mientka 

Shoes Shmcii agii Pollsliiiil 



Baggage Transfer. 



Make old shoes look like new 

Neat, c lassy workmanship 

)r4er»left at the Ainh«T«t Houm will receive | Oprn Nunilay rirnMnt Hi. 

prompt attentlo* Jnsi Below AmHy M. 



Leaving Jbr thp ffolidays' 

The tr'p is often long. You'll relieve 
your monotony with Fstima Cigarettes. 

or\ £_ _ Wnh each package of FaHma uoa 

^w lOr «cf a sonant coupon, 25 of which 

15 cents 



fd a prnnant coupon, 25 of w 
tecun a handtome fell college 
paid ( / itJi^-tcleUlon of 



nsoiliei Black aim Wliile Soovenii Day 

SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 1912 

By buying an unusual large amount of Black and 
White Cigars we were aJ)ie to secure another lot of 

We will give one of these Bill Folds to every purchaser of 

25c Worth of Black and White Cigars on Satuiday, March 9> Only 

Come in and get a good line on our 

More for your money than ever before 

Henry Adams & Co. 

Ttie HGX.A.I^L^ Stores o« tr.« oo«-»m^i^ 



1^ 



The College Signal, Toesdaj, March 5. i9»g- 



The College Signal, Tueadaj, March 5, 191s. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Arrteultural College. 



BOABD OP BDITOSt. 

ALDEN C. BRETT. 1912. EdWoc-ln-ChW. 

n. H. VANZWALENBURC. 13, A««lit«in Editor. 
JESSE CARPENTER. JR.. 1912 Msiuelnf Editor. 
MARSHALL C. PRATT. 1912. Competition Editor 
ROYAL N. HALLOWELL. 1912. AthlBtlcl. 

JOSEPH A. HARLOW. 191 J. Athletic*. 

OSCAR G. ANDERSON. 1913. AhimnI NolM. 
SILAS WILLIAMS. 1912. D«p«rti»i«it No»«e. 

S. MILLER JORDAN. 1913. C eMsf NolM. 



BUSINESS DEPASTMIlfT. 

ALBERT W.DOOCE 1912. BuaiMM MaiMfar. 
GEORGE ZABRISKIE. 1913 AaM. Bus. Manae«r. 
ERNEST S. CLARK. JR.. 1914. CIrcuUtlon. 

CHESTER E. WHEELER. I9M, ClroilaHoa. 
STUART B. FOSTER. 1914. C<reulBtioii. 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Albbrt W. DoDGt. 



ome*. 



Vol. XXII. TUESDAY, MAR. 5. No. 20 

The Indoor rifle season Is drawing to 
a close and with but two more matches 
to be shot, one with Louisanna and 
the other with Princeton, the scores 
of Iowa State College, the probable 
winner In the western league, are be- 
ginning to attract more attention. The 
team which wins the national cham- 
pionship will have to shoot over 950. 
The Iowa team has been shooting that 
score, or better, since practically 
their first match. And, keeping an 
eye on the sectional championship, 
which of coarse must be won first, 
Princeton is a team which Is capable 
of springing some surprises in its two 
remaining shoots. 

M. A. C. has been doing remarka- 
ble work on the targets and improv- 
ing steadily. The team's high score 
to date, 956, was shot in the last 
match, so the men are really rounding 
into form, and not ranging inconsis- 
tently up and down the score column. 
With one of the best coaches that 
ever come to the college the team 
must show its best, for no easy road 
lies between it and the championship. 



Probably every student in college 
has had brought more or less forcibly 
to his notice at some time or other the 
fact that the present system in use In 
the library of reserving books for refer- 
ence reading is far from ideal. We 
should hate to admit that the standards 
of student honor are lower here than 
they should be and yet conditions would 
seem to indicate that such is the case. 
It is hardly living up to our conception 
of the "square deal" when one man 
appropriates for his own use a book or 
bulletin which every member of the 
class is required to read and which is 
supposed to remain in the library at all 



times, and yet we find this thing taking 
place every day. 

These conditions lead us to only one 
conclusion, namely this: the student 
standard of honor as a whole is not high 
enough to allow the use of such a sys- 
tem as Is now in vogue. This Is one 
of those cases In which the effective 
standard is only as high as that of the 
lowest member. 

We must do one of two things, 
either remove the cause, in this case 
the objectionable student, or safeguard 
ourselves by an adequate system of 
charging. The former Is impossible, 
the latter must be done. Let the 
reference books be kept directly In 
charge of the librarian, perhaps in the 
office, and let them be given out 
only on application and only after the 
person who receives them has been 
charged therewith. Let a heavy fine 
be levied for a failure to return such 
books at the required time. This will 
entail a large amount of extra work on 
the part of the librarian, it is true, but 
conditions seem to Indicate that this Is 
the only way In which the majority of 
the students can get a square deal. 



Chance of Location 



S. S. HYDE 

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Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Hroken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Fine Watch Repairing Promptly and 
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COLLEGE NOTES 

About 20 freshmen have turned out 
for practice for the Interclass track 
meet. 

Rev. J. W. Cambell of Newtonvllle 
was the speaker of the Sunday morn- 
ing chapel. 

Dr. Wiley, the famous pure food 
champion, lectured at College Hall 
Sunday evening. 

The "boy magician astounded and 
delighted a Social Union audience In 
the Drill Hall Saturday evening. 

Mr. Alfred Evans of Northampton 
spoke at the Y. M. C. A. meeting 
Tuesday evening taking as a subject 
"The Golden Sky." 

Saturday's Metawaupe Treck was a 
cross country hike over Mt. Warner. 
A small sized army turned out for the 
endurance contest. 

J. D. French, G. C. Howe and H. 
T. Roehrs were chosen for the Junior 
Banquet committee at a 1913 class- 
meeting last Wednesday. 

Parker, Moreau and Walker were 
sent to Boston as a student committee 
to argue for more dormitories before 
the House committee on agriculture. 
The delegation also were prlvlledged 
to appear before Gov. Foss. 

At the Stockbrldge Club, Tuesday 
night, Post '13 spoke of grain-growing 
as It relates to the general farmer; 
while Heffron '14 spoke of ihe subject 
from the standpoint of a dairyman. 
An open discussion followed. 

Senior class officers were elected 
last week as follows: President, R. R. 
Parker of Maiden ; vice-president, E. 



PARKS. 

FLORIST. 

Flowers for all occcasions. 

Mail or telephone orders given 
prompt attention. 

239 Main St., Northampton 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

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LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
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AMHERST FURNITURE 



and 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 




It's a good thing not to worry about 
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Buy your shoes from 

Iliii Shop IhaUlas TDb Style 

'• Walk Over, " Haywood Shoes, 

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Bolles " Special, " Stetson Shoes, 
$5.00 to 98.00 



KKPAIktNG DEPARTMENT 

E.M. BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Next to Corner Drug Store. 



Angier, '13. 



Clark, '13. 



We have a full line of Banners, Post 
Carda, College Songs, Seal Papers. Foun- 
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COLLEGE STORE 

BASEMENT OF NO. COLLEGE 



Eldridge, '14. 



Tarbell, '14. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



E WELL'S 



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PRINTERS, 



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AMHERST, MASS. 



High-grade artistic work. Perfect satisfaction guaranteed. 

Studio newly equipped with large sky light 

and special lense for large 

groups. 

All styles the latest. Fine picture framing 



N. Boland of South Boston ; secretary 
and treasurer, F. A. Madison of East 
Greenwich. R. I.; historian, E. B. 
Young of Dorchester; class captain, 
R. K. Clapp of Westhampton; ser- 
geanl-at-arnns, W. R. Bent of Marl- 
boro. 



REPORT OF RIFLE TEAM 
EXPENSES, 1911 

This report has betn delayed on ac- 
ccunt of Captain Martin's accident. 

RECE'PTS. 

F-:m Alumni $233 CO 

Frcm Faculty (collected ty Capt. 

Martin) 20.00 

(collected by Mr. Racicot) 25 00 

From student body and faculty 

(collected by Mr Eharpe) 108.00 

From other sources lOO.OO 



Total 

EXPENSES 

Deficit from previous year 

Expense of sending team to Wake- 
field and week's training for 
seven men and coach 

Pud coach 

Board and other expenses of coach 

Carpenter & Morehouse 

Postage, envelopes, paper 

Stenographer 

Telegraph and telephone 

Three trip* to Springfield for rifles 
etc 

Dining Hall 

Misscellaneous 



$486 00 
I 45.25 



143.76 

80 00 

56 25 

4.75 

24 00 

420 

3.43 

505 

1.40 

13 56 



Total $38164 

Balance on hand, all expenses paid $104.36 
Respec fully, 

Geo. C Martim, 
Capt, U. S. Army, retired. 
Prof.. Military. Science and Tactics 

TENNIS OUTLOOK 

Although the tennis schedule has 
not been completed or ratified as yet 
by the athletic board, games with the 
following colleges have been arranged: 
Williams, Dartmouth. Vermont, Con- 
necticut Aggie, Trinity and Springfield 
Training school. Several good trips 
will be taken and four or five home 
Karnes played. 

As the tennis courts of the Drill 
hall will not be torn up for repairs this 
year it Is expected that they can be 
put into good condition early in the 
season. Indoor practise will probably 
itart immediately after the spring 
recess. 

Only one man, Johnson, was lost by 
graduation from last year's team. In 
addition to Captain Brett are Linn ' 1 2 
and Rohers '13. Damon '14 also 
had some practise last year. 

Archibald and Draper showed up 
best In the fall tournament but It Is 
desirable that more freshmen come 
:ut when the call is Issued for 
candidates. 



college and Frederick A. Ober '72, 
Author, Explorer and Naturalist. 

Secretary, Dr. John A. Cutter '82. 

Treasurer, Walter L. Morse '95, 
Terminal Engineer. Grand Central De 
pot. 

Chorgeus, Sanford D. Foot, '78, 
Manufacturer. 

The President, Secretary and Treas- 
urer were appointed a committee on 
ways and m.eans with full power as to 
determination of tltne, place of annual 
reunion and arrangements therefore. 

Mr. J.E. Barrett '75 was applnted 
Chairman of the Board, and took the 
place of the retirlig chalrinan. Pro- 
fessor Henry E. Chapin, Sc. D., '81. 

Adjourned, 

John A. Cutter, Secretary. 



INTERCLASS TRACK MEET 

The annual Interclass track meet 
will be held at the Drill Hall. March 
9th. The following events will be run. 

30-yard dash. 

Shot put. 

High jump. 

300-yard dash. 

600-yard dash. 

1000-yard run. 

One mile run. 

Relay. 

R. T. Beers, Mgr. 



M. A. C. CLUB OF NEW YORK. 

At a meeting of the Board of Gov- 
ernors held at the St. Dennis Hotel, 
February 1 0th. 1912, the following 
were elected officers of the club: 

President. Daniel Willard '82, Presi- 
dent Baltimore and Onio Railroad. 

Vice-Presidents. Former Senator 
Charles A. Gleason, Trustee of the 



RIFLE TEAM 

tConitnu*d from cwfa 1.1 

league. The total of the five highest 
scores was 956. Edmlnlster with 
197 equaled the league record made 
by Sharpe and McLaughlin of last 
year's team. The team has had the 
services of an excellent coach, Corp. 
Harlan E. Major of »he marine corps; 
he Is training them for the two final 
matches of the season, one w'.th 
Louisanna this week and the final with 
Princeton next week Princeton's 
high score to date Is 928. The follow- 
ing Is the score for the week : 

Standing. Prone Totti. 

Edmlnlster. 97 100 197 

McDougall. 94 99 193 

Wilde, 98 98 191 

Lloyd, 89 99 188 

Griggs, 89 98 187 

462 494 956 

Captain Martin has ordered dally 
practice for the team now to get It Into 
shape for the match with the winner 
of the western league for the Intercol- 
legiate championship of the United 
States. M. A. C. has made the high- 
est team score of the season and 
Edmlnlster equalled the league record 
of 197 made by McLaughlin and 
Sharpe of last year's team. A bunch 
of new rifles are being broken in by 
Corporal Harlan E. Major, who is 
coaching the team this year. In readi- 
ness for the big match. 



The 3 1 St season of Amherst College 
Dramatics was begun Wednesday 
night, when "Twelfth Night" was pre- 
sented at Athol. 



SOIL ROBBERY 

" Uncle Henry" Wallace, who presided over the great Conservation 
Congress at Kansas City last .September, said that as a nation we had 
been "soil miners," mining and selling the surplus of available feitility 
which had been stored up for ages, but that now we were "soil robbers." 
The surplus of available fertility of enormous tracts of tillage land has 
been mined on an extensive scale, so that in many sections the product 
of the land lias been reduced to the 'natural yield." that is, a yield based 
on the amount of plant food rendered available from year to year, which 
in turn is measured by the weakest link in the chain of fertility It can- 
not be foretold in what hour or in what year the weakest link will be dis- 
closed, but it is there and it may mean great loss. 

To preach dependence on potential soil fertility or the weakest link 
is not only poor economy and itn/ ethics, but it is unscientific, in that it 
will lead to crop bankruptcy and commercial loss Kathrr pieach in the 
growing of any crop, restoration of the plant food which it has removed, 
not only as croft insurance, but to maintain the integrity of the soil 
Prof. Stockbridge taught: 

" If the soil machine is a good one so much the better: if it has a 
balance of crop producing power to its credit, let us preserve that balance 
for an emergency. Let us not draw on it for present needs." 



tt 



STUDY THE PLANT FOOD PROBLEM ' 



BOWKER 



Fertilizer Company 

43 Chatham St. Boston 



Kuppenheimer's 
Fine Clothes 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the Frencb Shoe 

CUSTOM TAILORING A SPECIALTY 

Thomas Hkmenway, 'la, M. A. C. Representative 



YOU WILL FIND 
A FULL LINE 



OF 




F. A. SHEPARD. 

MEN'S STORE 




DUDLEY 

ourrrTTiR in 

Fine Athletic Goods 

FOR EVERY SPORT 



TOBAOOO 



AT- 



The College Drug Store 




•The BtST In The World' 
Write for cataloge. 



Chafliis H. Dudley 

HANOVER, . N. H. 

Agent, HAZEN m 



The College Signal, Tuesday, March 5, 191 s. 



.•■ A. A A.*-. A A 







•, A A, AyJfcJtv^'.^-* • • ■ - " • " 

' ■ '.A.AA A-> .' A A A.'- • • • • • *' V V >rv>^v . . ...AAAA. 

COODS FOR MEN. 

C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 

English and Scotch Woolens. 

THB BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 



/sr«s66aa(SfSig(6A6<"j^Vif%^*v>^KVj^*** .••■•• vvybAA^ywiaiA6A6a^vvNvy 



Highest Grade Roses 

We are offering to our local patrons, selection from our large 
stock of finest Roses. csj>ecially grown for the New York and Hosion 
Fmiwkr Makkeis. 

THE MONTGOMERY CO., Inc., 

HADLEIY, MASS. 

TELEPHONES. 

Amherat. 196-R. 
Northampton. 060, 



GENUINE - THOMAS - PHOSPHATE - POWDER 

• Basic Slag Meal) 

Grows Big Red Apples and Other Fruits 

TROPHIES WON BY USERS OF 

Genuine - Thomas - Phosphate - Powder 

A I TH I 

GREAT NEW ENGLAND FRUIT SHOW 
Held at Boston. Mass., October 23-28, 1911 

International Apple Shippers' Association's Cup for liest ( ommercial Kx- 

hibit of Packed Kniil Won by ( dnycrs 1- .irni. (.. A. I)ri\v, Msjr, Conn. 
Silver Cup for Best Display of Baldwin Apples offered bv (Governor 

Foss, of Massaclujsetts. Won by T. K. Wiiisor, Khnde Isl.ind 
Silver Shield for Best Rxhibit of Rhode Island (Ireenings ..tferrd bv 

(ioveriior Pothier, of l\h<i<le Isbind Won by T K Wiiix*! K'hi.d. Island. 
$25.04) Ca*h for Best Barrel of King Apples otTcred by \\ »*v It DouKJas 

Company, of Coiuuc Ucut \\'<>n l>y l.lij.ih KoKcrs, ( onnec litut. 
First Prize for Best Barrel of Khode Island CJreenlnKS. Won by Klijah 

Ko^ers, (OnntTticut. 
First Prize $50.00 Best 5 Boxes of Apples. Any Variety or \arieties. 

Won by Conyer's Karm, <i. A. I)rew, Managrr. Connecticut 
Second Prize $25.00- for Best 5 Boxes of Apples. Any Variety or 

Varieties. Won by N. S. Winsor. Khode Island. 
First Prize- Best Box Exhibit of Apples. Won i)y Conyer\ I arm. « , \ 

Drew. Manager. Connecticut 
Silver riedal— Best Packed F.xhibit of Apples. Won by Conyer's Farm, 

(r A Drew. Manai;cr. Conn«rticnt 
First Prize Best Box of Khode Island ClreeninKS. 

Winsor, Rhode Island. 
SweepsUkes for Best Box of Apples Packed for Market $75.00. 

by ( onyer's Karm, ('.. A. Drew. .Mana>;er. Conntctidit 
Berlin Prize $25.00 Cash and Silver Medal. WOn b\ C<myer» Karm, 

(i A. Drew. .Manager. (Connecticut. 
Connecticut Pomologlcai Society -Silver Medal for Best Table of Fruit. 

Won by Conver's K.aiin. C. A. Drew, C.eneral Man.ivjtr. C oniui lii m 
Massachusetts Agricultural College SweepsUkes for Winning Largest 

Number of Prizes. Won by Conyer's Farm, (/ A. Drew, Manager. Conn. 

Numerous Other I'ri/e-. Won bv ah-vc and other users (ienuine 11. om?- l'h<.s( li.ite r,.\Mif r 

Why Not Put YOUR Fruit in the Prize Winning Class by Purchasing 

GENUINE THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

Key-Tree Brand. From 

THE COE - MORTIMER COMPANY 

51 Chambers Street, New York City 

Our Bookltt,"l p-to-l)ate I ruit Growing with Thoman Pli-sphat.- I'owdpr," is •sent fieeif w.ii 



Won by T. K. 



w. 



mention The College Signal 



DEPARTMENT MOTES. 

EXTENSION 

A separate program has been issued 
I for Dairy Day, March 13th, which is 
Wednesday of Farmers' Week. The 
leaflet includes Information about the 
second annual dairy show, which will 
I be held that day, and gives a list of 
the special prizes offered for excellence 
in various lines. These programs 
may be obtained at the office of the 
Extension Department. 

Dr. Harvey W. Wiley, chief chem- 
ist of the United States Department of 
Agriculture, spoke at Amherst. Sunday 
evening in connection with the Am- 
herst college Christian Association 
meeting on the subject, "The Public 
Health, Our Greatest National Asset." 
He kept the crowd of students, faculty 
and townspeople which fiilr'd College 
hall to overflowing. In continuous roars 
of laughter, and incidentally told them 
a great deal about what the country is 
doing towards better national health, 
wha' it ought to do and what it is likely 
to do. The meeting was well attended 
by M. A. C. men. 

LANDSCAPE GARDENING 

Monday afternoon, Feb. 26th Pro- 
fessor Waugh of the Landscape 
department lectured before the Low- 
ell Woman's club at Lowell on Civic 
Improvement. Tuesday he appeared 
before the Homestall commission at 
the State House. 

The Seniors taking landscape gar- 
dening are having as class work sev- 
eral practical problems to solve. 
Some of the problems are the design- 
ing of a tract of 47 acres owned by 
W. R. Brown, into house lots from 
one to five acres in size; mak<ng a 
different development of the various 
town commons and city centers in this 
vicinity ; the redesigning of and plant- 
ing schemes of some of the faculty 
grounds. The graduates all say that 
this work helps them very materiklly 
when they get onto actual jobs. 

Although Governor Foss believes 
that only practical agriculture should 
be taught here there are 23 students 
who are taking up engineering in the 
Junior and Senior classes. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'85.- Dr. Joel E. Goldthwait of 
Boston recently lectured before stu- 
dents at Harvard University. 

'86. — C. W. Glapp, formerly assist- 
ant superintei.dent of the Connecticut 
Valley Street Railway company at 
Northampton, has been appointed 
engineer and superintendent cf ways 
for the company with headquarters at 
Greenfield. 

'04. — Mr. and Mrs. Burt A. Lewis 
announce the marriage of their sister 
Martha Adelaide Severance to Reuben 
Raymond Raymoth, Jan. I7ih, at 
Tacoma, Wash. 

06, — Charles A. Tirrell visited col- 
lege last week. Present address 815 
Sieinway Hall, Chicago, 111. 



I 



and am interested in NEW ENGLAND 
ACiKICULTURE and have devoted a 
Special Department of my business to 
the handling of FARMS and COUN- 
TRY JIOMKS with F. P. MARSTON. 
N. H. '81, as Manager. Correspondence 
.solicited. Send for RAYMOND'S RED 
LETTER, Farm and Country Home 
Edition. Reliable agents wanted. 

T. H. RAYMOND 



Central Square, 



Cambridge, Mass. 



E. B DICKINSON D.D.S. 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

OrricB Hours; 
L» ^o Atf .A.. iM . 1 .»«.« to «S F*. &I . 



FOR FARMS ! 

Big, Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building Lots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W. R BROWN 

Savings Bank Bl'k, 
\mherst. Mus 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

High-Grade College Work 
LAUNDRY 



Shirts, 


10-15C 


Collars, - 


JC 


CufTs. - 


»c 


Plain wash. 


40C per doz. 


Same, rough dry, 


- 150 per do«. 



Ralph R Parker, agent. C. S. C. House, 
S5 Pleasant St. 

Francis S. Madison, agent for \f)\% and 
short cotjrse, \'v\ I.al). 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Fred S. Merrill, agent, C .S. C. House 

85 I'leasant St 

Put full name and address on laundry 




mis CATK108UE 

SHOULD BE 
IN THE HANDS 
OF EVERY ONE 
INTERESTED IN 
ATHLETIC SPORT 

MMllrtI rrp« 



Kx per ie need u«t» 
.i(ir«>»> that Wright 
& Ditson article* 
are luperiar. Thev 
are desiitned and 
niad»* bv men who 
are experts and who 
know fiowtn u^ethe 
Roods themselves 



Complete Hqulpment for Lawn 
Tennis. Base Ball, (iolf, Cricket, 
Track and F-ield Sports, Basket 
Ball, Toot Ball and Lawn (lames 



Wright & nitsnn 
I.awn I ennis Guide 
10 Cents 



WriRht & DItson 
Ba<ie Ball Guide 
10 Cents 



To fafe time addreas our ntarrst start 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

344 Washington 5t., Boston, Hass. 

NEW YORK CHICAOO 

22 Warren .St. tiq N. Wabash Ave. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

359 Market St, 

PROVIDENCE, R. \. CAMBRIDQE. MASS. 

76 Weybosset St. Harvard Square 



The Collefe Signal, Tuesday, March 5, 1911. 




Cono. Valley SI. Ry. Lines 

FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricuU 
tural department The new green* 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations, violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

a; Main St., Masonic BIdg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Cicsfid 9nfy fr^m i A. JHf. to 4 A. M. 



•07.— Charles A. Tirrell, chief 
assistant to Jens Jensen, the famous 
Chicago landscape architect, recently 
visited college. 

Notice 1908. 

Your contribution to the fourth class 

letter is now due. 

J. A. Hyslop, Secretary, 
1628 Columbia Road, 

Washington, D. C. 

'08. — Carleton Bates has returned 
to his home in Washington, D. C, 
after a three months official trip 
through the East. 

'08. — T. L. Warner is in charge of 
a field party of the U.S. Coast and 
Geodetic Survey at San Luis, Obispo, 
Cal. 

'09. — H. G. Noble Is reported to 
have deserted the profession of land- 
scape gardening in Chicago for farm- 
ing in Massachusetts, having recently 
bought a farm near Springfield. 

'10.— R. S. Eddy, traveling in Ver- 
mont for the Bowker Fertilizer com- 
pany, visited friends around college 
recently. 

'10. — M, S. Hazen. salesman for 
Coe- Mortimer Co., has been trans, 
ferred from the Central District of 
New York state and now covers Wes- 
tern New York and North Pennsylva- 
nia, over to the Ohio line, the fnest 
fruit country in the world. Address 
Box 275, Rochester, N. Y. 

'10. — H. R.Francis was married in 
Minneopolis last June and is now super- 
intendent of grou.ids at the Culver 
Military Academy, Culver, Ind. 

•10.— W. M. S. Titus will super- 
intend a farm in York Village, Me., 
after March 16ih. 

' 1 I . — At an anniversary meeting of 
the Y. M. C. A. in Middiebury, Vt., 
Irving W. Davis, a member of the 
Middiebury college faculty, gave a 
practical talk on commercial orchard- 
ing, advocating the selection of a few 
varieties and a careful study of them. 
During the farmers' institute in recent 
session in Middiebury, Mr. Davis also 
gave an address. 



SOMETHING NEW! 

Not the same old line 

Better inquire about that 

No. TS% 

Also a few others for comfort and 
economy. 

WOOLLEY '14 

THE BA»S ftHOC rOR HARD SCRVICC 



If yon want to be 

HOLID WITH THE OIRI.H 

you BiuRt have your clothes pressed and cleaned 

JkT BPSTBIlf' 8 

11 Amtty St. Maroon Store 

PfMslng and Clennlng a sp'-clBlty 

MoHl liberal ticket ■yatein In town 



Aa I am dlrectljr ennnected wttb a Wboleaale 
House, I can 

SAVE YOU MONEY ON CLOTHES 

will be pleased to show samples and iitylea of 
Winter 8altx and Overooaia. 

M« B. WHITE, 101a. HttDt a Block 




THE 

SMOOTHEST 



CKATING in the keen air 
— the companionship of a 
pipe — the pleasure ol a tobacco 
such as Velvet 1 

VeUet it the best leaf — aged over 
two years in the warehoiu< — a (low, 
■ilent trantformalion irorn hdt:>h lr«| 
to a mellow imolLing tobacco. Time 
gradually rvicUlh« bile -^nia'utfs ihe 
good qualiiie* of the leaf a Bavi r 
untuuil — good — -wondetiully giMxil 

Such a tobacco take* lime lo pro- 
duce — ntrrme care withal, but ihi* 
U the smoke we all want— 6j wliy 
Dot? 

At all dealen. 

SPAULDING & MERRICK 
Chicago 






Full Two 
Ounce Tins 



la 



WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 

In so far as uur benefits are mutual. 

THE AMHERST CAS COMPANY 

Evorythiing Eleo'trical 



Scbool and Colksc Photograpbers . . . 




LOCALLY: 5» Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadley, Mass. 



Main Office: 

1546-1548 Broadway, 

New York City 



These .Studios offer the best skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



M.D. OILMAN. 



C. A. MOrrKT. 



TELEPHONE 1079-3. 

GILMAN and M OFFET. 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 

CONFECTIONERY. 

<07toail Maik Strht. 

Worcester, Mass. 



STEAM rin iNc;, 

GAS FIT UNO, 1 I.NNING 



Telephone S9 — 4- 



CHARLES DANCE & SON. 

PLUMBERS. 



Specialty of Kepairintj 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lf.ai) LiejHTS, &c. 

« Clifton Ave., AMHERST, MASS. 



The College Signal. Tuesday, March 5, 191a. 



PI. J. Lepode, IDG. 



Proprietors of 



mirO-LIVEBY-iiOBSE 

Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 

Td. 183. 




ASK YOUR 

STATIONER 

FOR 



Ward** Fountain Pens, Fine Papers 
and Envelopes, Students' Supplies. 
Send for samples of Engraved Invita- 
tions, Class and Fraternity Paper, 
Banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, etc. 



SAMUEL WARD CO. 



WflBD'S 



5763 Franklin Street 
BOSTON 



All Styles of 



SWEATERS 
AND JERSEYS 






TRADE » 






I MARK 






Complete Line of 



Athletic Goods 
and BANNERS 



17 South College 



THE 



Massachusetts Agricultural CollegB 



Trains men for attractive positions in vocations 
that are not overcrowded. 

Tuition is free to residents of Massachusetts. 

Necessary expenses are moderate. 

A CATALOG WILL BE SENT ON REQUEST 



KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST, MASS, 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Binjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

LENtii OKINUIMO 

Fm// lint of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Aasoclatton, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Thirteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Fourteen Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club. 

Dramatic society. 

Debating Society, 

Public Speaking Council, 



H. C. Walker, President 

Geo. H. ChapiTian, Secretary 

J. W. Coviil, Manager 

R. J. Borden, Manager 

P. T. Beers. Manager 

H H. Wood, Manager 

S. M. Jordan, Manager 

O. G. Anderson. Manager 

E. S. Clark, Manager 

F. S. Madison, Presiaent 

L. S. Caloweli, President 

J. D. French, Manager 

F. S. Madison, President 

G. W. Ells, Secretary 

Geo. Zabriskie, Manager 

J. M. Heald, President 

T. J. Moreau, President 



PROMINENCE 

Is given here to the fact that we take 

special care in the posing of 

subjects in order to bring 

out all the good 

features. 

Light and shade is skilfully diffused 

This and the excellent finish makes 

our PHOTOGRAPHS masterpitces 

of reproductive art. 

SHIllARE'S STUDIO. 

142 Miln St., Norlkuiiitoi 



R C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 



H^hen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CLEANSING. 

PRESSING. 

REPAIRING. 

Quickest t»«r*lc«>. Bent Work. CoweH I'rirr 

All woik carefully done. Work called for mi 
delivered, drnts' overcoat*, suits, oants iHu 
coats. Ladies' tine linen suita a siwcialty. 

Wn. FRANKLYN. Prop. 

Rear Nash Bl'k, Amherst. Ttl. No. yn-t 



CARS 



JACKSON &- CUTLER 



If you are getting the 

THB MOST VOS TOU& MONET 

th<n you are eating at the 

O. K., NEXT TO POST OFFICE 

J. W. ROUNK. Prop. 

Have you tried our aS'<^^"^ Dinners? 
If not, why not? 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 

Custom Work 

Holland's Block, Phoenix Row 



Telephone Connection 

TAILOR AND PRE8SER 

Fall and Winter Suits 

Chevrons and Stripes 

Put on Military Suits 

Full Dress Suits to Rent 

Gents' Furnishings 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

X4a4-Z436 Chestnut St., * 'Philadelphia, Pa. 



Leave AQQIE COLLEQE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUK. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AOQIE COL- 
LEU E at 7 and J7 mlm. past each 
HOUR. 

SpMtel C«ra at RcMonabta Raw* 

MHERSr & SONDEBLANO ST. RV. Ct 



THE NEW ENGLAND NEWSPAPER 

All the news and the Truth 
about it, in the :: :: 

Springfield Republican 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 
News fully reported. 

BEST SPORTING PAGES 

The Weekly Republican will be sent 
free for one month to anyone 
wishing toAry.it- •, '' 
Daily, %8. Sunday, %2. Weekly, \i- 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Vol. XXII. 



MASSACHU SETTS AGRICULTURAl- COLLEOE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, March 12, 1912. 



No. 2 • 



ALL NIGHT LIGHTS 

To be Installed During the Summer. 
Fire Escapes to be Put In. 

It has at last been officially stated 
that the dormitories are to be furnished 
with more adequate means of fire pro- 
tection. The president definitely 
stated, when interviewed by a Signal 
reporter that he has received estimates 
on the plan for rewiring the halls and 
tnat this much needed change will be 
among the usual summer repairs. 
This will give all night lights in the 
hails and basement providing greater 
conveniences at all times and safety 
in case of fire. Besides this improve- 
ment, each room will be furnished 
with a rope escape for which the stu- 
dent will be required to make a deposit 
at the opening of the college year. 



SPECIAL TO THE SIGNAL 

By wireless to the Signal. 

We are glad to hear — through a 
little bird — that oifr fellow collegians to 
the south of ys have "yipped one over 
on" their faculty in part payment for 
the exclusive Pitonoff matinee held a 
short time ago in the natatorium. Fif- 
teen Amherst undergrads nodded 
tnrough Wednesday chapel, while the 
rest of the college, locked In College 
Hall, enjoyed a chorus girl sketch 
imoorted "at enormous expense" 
direct from Northampton's new palace 
of notoriety, the Plaza. As per circu- 
lar "babes in arms, members of the 
faculty and representatives of the 
press" were rigorously excluded. 
Neither did any story of the occasion 
appear in print ; one student scribbler 
of daily crumbs of information even 
searching through countless mall sacks 
to find the "copy" he had mailed, to 
save himself from expulsion. 

Cheer up, you can trust us with 
your secret. 



HOCKEY ELECTION. 

At a recent meeting of the hockey 
team John G. Hutchinson of Arling- 
ton, Mass., was elected to captain the 
team for its next season. Hutchln- 
sin attended the Arlington high school 
where he engaged in athletics playing 
on the baseball team and also upon 
the championship hockey team. He 
has been a member of the team here 
for the past two years and his work has 
been both brilliant and consistent. He 
is a member of Phi Sigma Kappa. 

(Conttmaad on o*c« 2.| 



RIFLE TEAM 



T 



FARMERS' WEEK OPENS TIE IN TRACK MEET 



Good Score Shot in Last Match in East- 
ern League Against Princeton. 

The shoot on Saturday against 
Princeton closed the competition in 
the eastern league. The score as un- 
officially announced by coach Major 
was 954 and should be high enough to 
win the match as Princeton's best ef- 
fort up to the present time has been 
932. Should M. A. C. win this last 
match she will be in line to shoot Iowa 
who has already been declared winner 
of the western division of the league 
with nine victories and no defeats to 
her credit. It is difficult to say what 
the outcome of this match will be, but 
at the present rate of improvement 
M. A. C's score should be well above 
the 960 mark. This shoot will take 
place as soon as possible, probably 
during the next week. 

The rifle club has recently accepted 
a challenge from the University of 
California to an outdoor match to be 
held some time in May. As yet it Is 
difficult to say what will be the con- 
dition of the outdoor team as it was 
greatly weakened by the loss of last 
year's graduating class. The Univer- 
sity oi California i:> :>oniewhai 01 a 
dark horse in outdoor rifle shooting 
but she may be expected to put up a 
strong argument. 

Secretary Ellis of the rifle club has 
recently received from the National 
Ritle Association targets to be used 
in shooting qualifications for marks- 
man and sharpshooter. Any member 
of the club Is eligible to try for these 
qualifications and silver and bronze 
watch fobs will be presented to those 
qualifying as sharpshooter or marksman 
respectively. The cost of these tar- 
gets is 40 cents per set but Captain 
Martin has offered to pay for all tar- 
gets on which a man qualifies. The 
targets are smaller than the official N. 
R. A. match targets, having a one 
inch ball, and the requirements are, 
therefore, more severe. Any number 
of targets at 40 cents may be used 
until a man has qualified and these 
may be secured at any time from the 
secretary of the club. 



NOTICE 

All those planning to go to the 
Informal should get their tickets before 
Saturday. They may be bought at 17 
South College from E. N. Boland 
'12. 



Large Registration. Long List of Ex- 
I cellent Speakers in Program. 

The tourth annual fanners' week of 
j the college opened yesterday at noon 
j with what promises to be a record reg- 
i istration. Farmers* week seems to 
have become a permanent feature of 
the college extension work, 800 peo- 
ple attending last year and the program 
this year surpasses anything yet 
attempted. 

The lectures and demonstrations 
are divided into four groups or sections, 
namely, Farm Crops and Farm Ma.n- 
agement. Dairying and Animal Hus- 
bandry, Horticulture, and Women's 
Section. This is done that lectures 
on allied subjects may not conflict and 
that farmers may be able to hear 
those subjects in which they are 
interested. 

The program for the section of Farm 
Crops and Farm Management includes 
lectures on soil fertility, commercial 
fertilizers, Alfalfa, hay, farm account- 
ing, industrial alcohol, concrete with 
demonstration, breeding, dairy improve- 
ment, co-operation in milk production, 
sheep and poultry judging, farm man- 
agement, potato growing, construc- 
tion of farm buildings, etc. Besides 
Professors Foord, Hurd, Graham, 
McLean, Lindsey, Chamberlain, 
Brooks, Waid, Haskins and Haskell 
of the college, H. O. Daniels of Mid- 
dletown, Conn., Dr. Charles E. North 
of New York city and Ralph Whit- 
comb of Amherst will be heard. 

In the section on Dairying and Ani- 
mal Husbandry the various questions 
concerning the production, testing, 
handling and sale of clean milk and 
the management of poultry will be dis- 
cussed. Professors Lockwood, Mc- 
Lean, Graham and Lindsey of the 
college will be assisted by Mr. Story 
and Mr. Quaife. 

The section on Horticulture will 
take up the subjects of fruit growing 
and marketing, market gardening, 
greenhouse management and the con- 
trol of insect pests and will be ad- 
dressed by Professors Sears, White, 
Yeaw, Moon, Fernald and Waugh of 
the college, Mr. Shaw and Mr. Nor- 
man of the department and Mr. 
Wheeler of Concord, Mr. Frost of 
Arlington, a manufacturer of insecti- 
cides, Mr. Howard of West Newton 
and Dr. Whetzel of Cornell. 



[ConttniMd •• pace 5] 



Seniors and Juniors Each Tally 37 
Points. 1914 a Poor Third. 

At the annual interclass indoor 
meet held at the Drill Hall Saturday 
the S-iniors and Juniors captured an 
equal number of points with the two 
lower classes trailing far behind. The 
Seniors presented a very evenly 
balanced team winning five events and 
scoring in all. 

Souihwick had an easy time win- 
ning the mile lowering the record 1-5 
of a second at the same time and had 
he had someone to push him several 
seconds could have been chopped off. 

Tlie 300 was the closest race of the 
day with Clapp. Whitney and Nicolet 
running very close. They finished in 
the order named Clapp winning by 
several feet. 

The 600 was easily Clapp's race 
from the the start and he lowered the 
record by I -5 of a second. 

Nineteen-twelve lead throughout the 
meet and were S points ahead when 
the relay race was called. Captain 
Clapp and Southwick were again pres- 
sed into use after winning two firsts 
apiece and ran well. 1913 won this 
r«ce and Med the Seniors for first 
place, with 37 points. 

The meet was undoubtedly the best 
ever held and ex:ellent time was made 
considering the wet, slippery track. 
1912 now has a lead of 5 points in the 
race for the interclass cup having won 
the cross country run last fall, mak- 
ing the total standing for the cup to 
date, 1912,49; 1913,44; 1914. 10; 
I9I5, 7. 

Summaries follow: 

Mile run — Won by Southwick, 
1912; Baker 1913, second; Hutch- 
ing 1913, third. Time, 4 min., 53 
4-5 sec. 

300-yard dash —Won by Clapp, 
1912, Whitney, 1913, second; 
Nicolet, 1914, third. Time, 37 2-5 
sec. 

600-yard run -Won by Clapp, 19 12; 
Clark 1913, second: Callard, 1915, 
third. Time, I min., 23 4-5 sec. 

30-yard dash— Semi-finals, First 
heat won by Houghton 1915; Gray 
1912. Second heat, Larsen 1913 
and Davies 1914 tied for first. Final 
heat won by Davies 1914, Houghton 
1915, second; Gray, 1912. third. 
Time, 4 sec. 

Rope cllrab— Won by Shaw, 1912; 
Walker, 1912. second ; Whitney, 1913, 
third. 



INFORMAL, SATURDAY, MARCH 



6 



The'College Signal, Tuesday, Marchr.12, 1912. 



1000-yard run — Won by Southwick, 
1912; Baker, 1913, second ; Lucas, 
1914, third. Time— 2 min.,34 3-5 
sec. 

Shot put — Won by Samson. 1913; 
Elsenhaure, 1913, second, Slack, 
1912, third. Distance, 42.8 feet. 

High jump— Won by Huntington, 
1913; Stack. 1912, and Hogg, 1914, 
tied for second. 

Relay race 1560-yards— Won by 
1913, (Barber. Clark, Whitney, Gore); 
1912. second. (Terry, Southwick, 
Gallagher. Clapp) ; 1914, third. 
(Smith, Nicolet, Wheeler, Davles.) 
Time, 3 min., 25 sec. 

Summary of points : 



Fvents. 
I mile 

300-yard dash 
60Q-yard dash 
30-yard dash 
Rope climb 
1000-yard run 
Shot put 
High jump 
Relay race 

Total points 
Cross Country 

Grand total 



1912 
5 
5 
5 
1 

8 
5 
1 
2 
5 

37 
12 

49 



1913 

3 
3 
3 

I 

3 

8 

5 

10 

37 
7 

44 



1914 lOIS 



2 
I 

10 



10 




wood and under the auspices of the 
Massachusetts Dairyman's association 
will also be held and will include exten- 
sive exhibits of dairy apparatus, 
machinery and equipment. A fruit 
show will be held in Wilder hall under 
the direction of Professor Sears and 
on Thursday a floriculture show will 
be held in French hail. A number of 
prominent breeders of horses and 
sheep have sent in some of their best 
stock for use in judging demonstrations 
during the week. 

On each evening of the week some 
special attraction will take place in the 
chapel. On Monday evening Dean 
Hunt of Pennsylvania State College 
lectured on "How to make the Coun- 
try Life Movement Effective." on 
Tuesday Dr. G. C. Creelman. Presi- 
Ident of the Ontario Agricultural Col- 
lege will speak on "What Canada does 
for her Farmers." on Wednesday 
evening a complimentary concert will 
be given to Farmers' Week visitors by 
the M. A. C. Musical club while on 
Thursday. President Butterfleld, and 
Hon. J. Lewis Ellsworth. Secretary 
of the State Board of Agriculture will 
speak. On Friday morning Prof. E. 
A. White will lead a personally con- 
ducted observation trip through the 
rose ranges of the Montgomery Co. , 
East Hadley, and through the Com- 
mercial range of H. W. Field of 
Northampton. 



Captain Peckham 
FARMERS' WEEK 

[Conilnuad from pa(e I .] 

A very Interesting and conclusive 
program has been arranged in the 
woman's department, covering all 
phases of home making and beautify- 
ing, and domestic science, and lead 
by a long list of strong speakers. 

During the week the Massachusetts 
Dairyman's association will hold Its 
business meeting and also the M.A.C. 
Agricultural Improvement association. 
On March 13 and 14 the M. A. C. 
Corn show will be held In the Drill 
hall and this will be terminated by a 
corn judging contest. A dairy show 
In direct charge of Professor Lock- 



UP-TO-DATE 



T 



COLLEGE FOOTWEAR* 



Elite Shoes, 
Swell Shod Shoes, 
Pumps the fit, - 



$3.50 to $5.00 
- $5.00 and $6.00 



$4.00 



EXPERT REPAIRING 



Pages Shoe Store, 



BKTWKEN THE BANKS 



HOCKEY ELECTION 

[Continued frnm pag« I] 

At the same time Wlllard S. Little of 
Newburyport was raised to the position 
of manager. Besides aspiring for 
honors in this department. Little is a 
player of no little ability having made 
his letter this year at the position of 
point. He Is member of Kappa 
Sigma. 

CONCERT BY MUSICAL CLUBS 

The musical clubs of the college 
gave a concert during the assembly 
hour on Wednesday, March 6. The 
selections were very well rendered and 
were greeted with great applause from 
1 the student body. The orchestra was 
especially in favor and numerous 
encores were called for. The selec- 
tions were very well chosen, those of 
the glee club showing both types of 
composition. The concert closed by 
the rendering of the college song by 
the combined clubs joined with the 
student body. The program follows : 

I Amazon March 

Orchestra. 

2. One. two. three, four Hawaiian Melody 

Glee Club. 

3. Carita Winne 

Mandolin Club. 

4. The night has a thousand eyes Nevin 

Quartette. 

6. Ramshackle Rag Snyder 

Orohearrm. 

6. Love's old iweet to«8 

Glee Club, 

7. The harbor of love Blake 

Mandolin Club. 

8. Sons of Old Massachusetts 

Combined Clubt. 



HARRISON'S NURSERIES... 

Berlin, Maryland. 
Have over two thousand acres in Nursery Stock. 
They offer a book on 

HOW TO GROW AND MARKET FRDIT 

For 50 cents. 

All prospective buyers are invited to visit the 

Nursery. 

They are the largest growers of fruit trees in 

this country. 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 




AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Be sure you load your Kodak or 
any Camera with the genuine 

Eastman Film 



X.OiyAK.i^ 



Victor lalkins macHines 



PHOTOGPAPHER 

The best workmanship, 

The latest styles, 

Reasonable prices 

Lincoln Building, Amherst, Mass. 



The Prospect House 



PERRYM 



The place to eat after the game. 
Attractive tables and rooms. Excel- 
lent service. Catering a specialty. 



DRUG STORE 



.iksk&t%«ra«» AACK««« 



MRS. C E. PERRY 

There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 



or 



C. R. ELDER 



The College Sifnal, Tuesday, March u, 1912. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



A Specialty of College Classes, 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



a»E. N. PARISEAU,j» 

Barber j^ Shop 

RAZORS HONKD 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Ma^s. 
THE 

HooYer& Smith Co. 

616 Cbettnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 



Philadelphia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 

■PEGIALI8T8 IN 
Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Priics, Trophies. 

Medals Collcfe Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

RinfS, Charms.-. 



««DELMONICO ON WHEELS" 

Note our Menu — 

BREAKFAST. 

Grape-fruit, Cereals. Hot Coffee, 
Do-nuts, Eggs, Fruit. 

DINNER. 

Soup, Hamburg Steak, Frankfurts with 

Sauerkraut, Ham. 

One of the following — Hash, Meat Pie, 

Fish Balls, Home-made Pies. 

SUPPER. 

Sardines, Beans, Sandwiches, 

Hot Dogs. 

Milk, Coffee, Cocoa. 

Coming soon — Strawberry Shortcake. 

Eat with us and save money. 

M. E. ANDREWS 

Successor to 5. S. HYOB 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 



Fine Kepalrlnr a Specialty 

7 rieasant St. Phillips Block 

Amherst. Mass. 



Barsalotti &; Gentoso 

Cigars ClKarettes 

Nice Line Fresh Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit, Soda. Etc. 

The Right (ioods at the KJKht Prices 

()t«-n till II oVl»Kk KVEKV night 
(oriitr \tiiity Mnri t*lr«iiaiil >>trrrtii 





OUR TAILORING 

Our Spring Wooieiis are now on display 
and it's none too early to leave your order 
for your Spring Tailoring. There art- many 
new and clioice fa>>rics tliis seanon in new 
colorings. We are showing excluiiive pat- 
terns ronfined to us for our trade. 

Suits $14 to $40 

Overcoats $12 to $35 

Trousers $5 to $iU 

If you know atwut our Splendid Tailoring, we rest our case; if you don't, then 
there's no better time than now to become familiar with the comliinalion of ijooei 
style, good tit, skillful wurkman.sliip and moderate prices. Ask our patrons— that's 
the test— two thousand patterns to select from. 

SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



The Worthy, r^^"^'-'- ^^^ leonurd 



FRANK H. IJANFORTII. Mfin. 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



ALBANY, 




Mikeri 

If 



Amhenl Corner In KafhNkfllar. 
M. B. MAGRATH &S01S 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 

Order! left at the Amherst Hou*e will receive 
prompt attention 



CAP A OOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



Toefll Mientka 

Shoes ShiRed and Poiisiiiiii 

Make old shoes luf>k like new 

Neat, classy workmanship 

4>p*-n Hu»<tM> l'lr««anl Ml. 

j«M tMom Amity ^t. 



THIS WEEK 



So good to get bade home xK^^K&&2^' i^ 



We are displaying the largest assortment of 

TOOTH BRUSHES 

ever shown in this town. It is to your advantage to look them over 

carefully. We have every style and quality at all prices. 

Kvery brush is guaranteed not to shed it.s bristles. 

We highly recommend the 

PEIARL TOOTH BRUSH 



Everything Inoica goo<!. tastes good, /j 4^ 

good— exactly like Fatima Cigarettes. \ 



1^ ccnt3 



Wnh each packagt ofFaHma uoa 
get a pennant coupon, 25 of whic. h 
tecare a handtome /ell college petf 
nant ( / 2t32)—*ikcUon of 100. 



Henry Adams & Co. 



The Coll«ge Signal. Tuesday, March 12. 1912. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, March 12, 191 2. 



THE CO LLEGE SIGNA L 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOABD OF SDIT0B8. 

ALDEN C. BRETT. 1912 E(Utor-ln-Chl«f. 

B. H. VANZWALENBURC 13. Atstatant Editor. 
JESSE CARPENTER. JR. 1912 Maiurlne Editor. 
MARSHALL C.PRATT. 1912, Compellilon Editor 
ROYAL N. HALLOWELL, 1912, Athletics. 

JOSEPH A. HARLOW. 1912. Athletics. 

OSCAR C. ANDERSON. 1913. Ahimni Notes. 
SILAS WILLIAMS 1912. Dep«ftm«nt Notes. 

S. MILLER JORDAN. 1913. Collee« Notes. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912. Business Mansger. 

GEORGE ZABRISKIE 1913 Asrt. Bus. Manager 
ERNEST S. CI ARK. JR . 1914. Circulation. 

CHESTER E. WHEELER. 1914, Clrculstton. 
STUART B. FOSTER. 1914, C'reutotton. 

Subscription $1 50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
Albert W. Dodge. 



Cntorad ■• seeond-clMW metier at the Amhsrsi 
Pwl Offlee. 

Vol. XXII. TUESDAY, MAR. 12. No. 21 



With this issue the senior members 
of the board retire making room for the 
new men and so it m^y not be out of 
place here to review briefly the past 
year. The work in general has been 
conducted much as for the year pre- 
ceedlng with perhaps a somewhat 
greater outlay for cuts and special 
features. 

The paper is not as efficient as it 
might be made for a number of reasons, 
the chief among them being these: 
In the first place there Is a lack of 
journalistic training among the mem- 
bers of the board. With the installing 
of a course in journalism this lack may 
be partially done away with If It Is 
required that men competing for posi- 
tions on the staff shall take this course. 
In the second place there seems to be 
a lack of inducement to bring out men 
of the greatest ability. These men 
invariably save themselves for activi- 
ties which are perhaps more spectacu- 
lar and at the same time entail less 
work. This lack must be remedied 
before we can have the best possible 
ability in college represented on the 
board. In the third place our compe- 
tition system Is sometimes unfair to 
men of real ability and this should be 
changed to give a square deal to all. 

The editor-in-chief -wishes to take 
this opportunity to congratulate the 
members of the old board on the suc- 
cess of the year just brought to a close 
and to express his appreciation of the 
conscientious work which has been 
done in all departments. Our final 
word to the new board is this, profit 
by both the mistakes and the successes 
of the past, be true interpreters of the 
old "Aggie Spirit" and make the com- 
ing year in the College Signal the 
best it has yet had. 



ble part of the situation is that these 
conditions exist while we have in col- 
lege men, who under favorable condi- 
tions would be able to materially lower 
the marks now recorded. There is 
something radically wrong in our sys- 
tem and it is up to us to find out what 
it is and to remedy the fault. 

It Is a well-known fact that records 
can be made only in an interclass track 
meet. To limit the possibilities of 
breaking records thus, is wrong for a 
number of reasons. In the first place, 
the competition In an Interclass meet 
is usually not great enough to force a 
good man to do his best. This fact 
has been very strikingly shown here 
during the past three seasons. We 
have had no one who could "push" 
our best runner. In the second place, 
a good man in order to obtain points 
for his class is entered in as many 
events as he is capable of running. 
Thus he does only moderately well, or 
ever poorly in all, and his time Is 
materially lowered. This Is simply the 
placing of class before college and the 
sacrifice of a college record to points 
in a class rheet. In the third place, 
there is not a great deal of systematic 
training for such a meet. The college 
record does not hold a high enough 
place in the scale of college honors to 
demand the effort of the best athletes. 
These are simply a few points which 
It would seem are important enough to 
deserve the careful consideration of 
every man. If we are to gain admit- 
tance to any intercollegiate organiza- 
tion we must have records which will 
compare favorably with those of the 
other colleges represented. 



ChKntC" of Location 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & optician 

Now at 51 Pleasant St. 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Fine Watch Repairing Promptly and 
Skilfully Done 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 




PARKS. 

FLORIST, 

Flowers for all occcasions. 

Mail or telephone orders given 
prompt attention. 

239 Main St., Northanpton 



It's a good thing not to worry about 
your pedal apparel, its correct, style 
comfort or durability. 

Buy your shoes from 

The Shop TliaUlas Hid Slyle 

•• Walk Over, " Haywood Shoes, 

I3.50, I400, I5.00 

Bolles " Special," Stetson Shoes, 

$5.00 to $8.00 

REPAIRING DEPARTMENT 

B.M. BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Next to Corner Drug Store. 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 



Angier, '13. 



Clark, '13. 



AND 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

(Notlcss lor this :»)lumn should be dropped In iha 
SioMAL Offlc»of handed loR. H. VanZwalenburg 
' 1 3. on or befor* the Saturday pracadinc aach lasua.] 

March 12—6-45 p. m., Stockbridge 
club Room G South College. 
6-45 p. M., Landscape Art club 
In French hall. 

March 13—1-30 p. m.. Assembly, 
Pres. Harry A. Garfield of 
Williams college. 

March 14—6-45 p. m.. Y. M. C. A. 
In Chapel. 

March 15— Signal Banquet at Pros- 
pect house. 

March 16—4-00 p. m., " Emerald 
Hop" m Drill hall. 

March 17— 9-15 a. m., Chapel, Ray 
Stannard Baker. 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



We have a full line of Banners, Post 
Cards, College Songs, Seal Papers, Foun- 
tain Pens, Candy, Tome and Student 
.Supplies, 

COLLEGE STORE 

basement of no. college 



Eldridge,'i4. 



Tarbell, '14. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



E WELL'S 



C^rptn-ler & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



No I, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



It is a well-known fact that the 
athletic records of this college are 
extremely poor ; so poor that the editor 
of the Index each year hesitates a long 
time before he bows to custom and 
publishes them. The really deplora- 



COLLEGE NOTES 

The Signal banquet will be held 
at the Prospect House Friday night. 

The Assembly hour Wednesday, 
March 6 was occupied by a concert 
given by the musical clubs. 

The Junior banquet will be held the 
evening of Friday. March 29th at the 
Hotel Kimball, Springfield. 

The hockey team has elected John 
G. Hutchinson 1914 of Arlington, 
captain for the next season and Wll- 
lard S, Little '13 of Newburyport, 
manager. 



H. E. KINSMAN, 

College Pbotograpbcr 

HASH BLOCK, MAIN ST., 
AMHERST, MASS. 

High-grade artistic work. Perfect satisfaction guaranteed. 

Studio newly equipped with large sky light 

and special lense for large 

groups. 

All styles the latest. Fine picture framing. 



Posters are out announcing a second 
"Dzien Polsko Amerykanskich Far- 
merow" to be held at the college. 
March 28. 

The Musical Clubs will give a com- 
plimentray concert to the Farmer's 
Week visitors, Wednesday evening in 
the chapel. 

The 1914 Index Board has been 
meeting regularly and already has 
started the preparation of what is in- 
tend::d to be the "best ever." 

The relay team will be entered in 
University of Pennsylvania relay car- 
nival in April accordin,j to the decis- 
slon of the Athletic Beard at a meet- 
ing held March 4th. 

Elections held for assistant manager 
of varsity hockey Wedn-ssday afternoon 
gave John D. Pellettof Worcester the 
position. The other candidates were 
Wing. Nicolet and Peters. 

A large number of men turned out 
Sunday night to hear Professor 
Sprague speak on "Socialism." Af- 
ter the meeting plans were laid for the 
formation of a club for the study of 
socialism. 

The following men were awarded 
the hockey letter for 1911-1912: 
Manager Wood '12. Captain Peck- 
ham M2, Ackerman '12, Walker '12. 
Sanctuary '12, Little '13. Jones, 
Hutchinson, Wooley and Needham of 
1914. 

A feature of Wednesday's Assem- 
bly was the report of the student com- 
mittee on dormltorl'^s that had been 
sent to Boston. Moreau's report 
would, no doubt, be classed as a good 
example of the realistic school of 
writing. 

The Grinnell Arena will be dedicated 
Wednesday, March 13. at 3-00 p, m. 
Addressed will be given by Pres. K. 
L. Butterfield, Mr, W. H. Bowker of 
the trustees, Dr. Carl Gray of the 
University of Pennsylvania and Prof, 
J, A. McLean, 

At a meeting held yesterday morn- 
ing the sophomore class elected the 
following committee for the sopho- 
more-senior hop : John G. Hutchin- 
son, John D. Pellett. L. Edgar 
Smith, Floyd G. Davies. Lester W, 
Needham, Edward C. Edwards, and 
Dettmar W. Jones. 



by certain mem.bers of the student 
body ai a concert given last Wednes- 
day by the M. A. C. Musical clubs. 

A certain amount of exuberance is 
surely permissible upon such an occa- 
sion, but when practices are resorted 
to. such as the scaling about of pro- 
grams, a diversion adopted by several 
upper classmen ; the banging with 
books upon chairs, and "cat calling," 
tactics indulged in especially by those 
students at the rear of the chipel 
beneath the gallery, and when to cap 
the climax, the college song Is sung to 
the ragtime like accompaniment of the 
drumming upon ihe backs of seats by 
a number of students, the limit is 
about reached. The fact that there 
were ladies and visitors present, 
seemed of relatively little importance. 

Evidently, we have In our student 
body, men who consider primarily 
their personal enjoyment, and who 
have little regard for the welfare of the 
college or of their fellow men. Such 
men are dangerous, but the sooner 
they can be brought to realize their 
Wuty, or are eliminated as undesirable 
characters, the better it will be for 
all concerned. 

Very truly yours, 

An Alumnus. 



SOIL ROBBERY 

" Uncle Henry" Wallace, who prt-sidt-d over the great Coiisei vation 
Congress at Kan.sas City last .Septemlier, said thai as a nation we had 
been "soil miners," mining and selling the surplus of available fertility 
which had been stored up for ages, but that now we were "soil robbers." 
The surplus of available fertility of enormous tracts of tillage land has 
been mined on an extensive scale, so that in many sections the product 
of the lanii has been reduced to the 'natural yield." that is. a yield ba.sed 
on the amount of plant food rendered available ftom veai to year, which 
in turn is measured by the weakest link in the chain of fertility It can 
not ht f<)retold in what hour or in what year the weakest link will br dis- 
closed, but it is there and it may mean great lo.ss. 

To preach dependence on potential soil fertility or the weakest link 
is not only poor economy and f>iu/ elhus, but it is unscientific, in that it 
will lead to crop bankruptcy and commercial lo.ss Kaihei pi each in the 
growing of any crop, restoration of the plant food which it has removed, 
not only as crop insurance, but to maintain the inlegrity of the soil 
I'rof. Stockbridge taught: 

" If the soil machine is a good one so much the better: if it has a 
balance of crop producing power to its credit, let us preserve that balance 
for an emergency. I.et us not draw on it for present needs " 



ti 



STUDY THE PLANT FOOD PROBLEM 



BOWKER 



Fertilizer Company 

43 Chatham St. Boston 



. 



COMMUNICATIONS 

(Communlcattona to the Signal conceminc mat- 
en cf canaral Interstt «r« welc»m«d. The Sional 
It not to b« hald responsible for tha opinions thus 
9>prata«<i.) 

Editor College Signal: 
Dear Sir: 

I trust that I may be pardoned 
for expressing myself In a matter in ; 
which most of us are deeply con- 
cerned : namely, the deportment and 
reputation of the student body. 

I have been directly connected with 
the college for several years past, but 
1 !hink I can truthfully say that I have 
never before, under similar circum- 
stances, observed such a deplorable ! 
exhibition of conduct as that shown . 



Amherst, Mass., March 4, 1912, 
To THE EorroR of the Signal: 
Dear Sir: 

Your editoral in the February 
27tn Issue in regard to the special ines- 
sage sent to the Legislature by Gov- 
ernor Foss Is, I think, one of the best 
I have ever read on such an Important 
subject In The Signal. 

Since the last appropriation bill has 
been sent in by the trustees and Presi- 
dent Butterfield I have followed it as 
closely as possible in such a distant 
land and I am fully convinced that the 
Governor is using our college unjustly. 

How a man of his position and ex- 
perience, "has the nerve" and lack 
of common sense to ask that cultural 
courses be despensed with is more 
than I can see Graduates of M. A. 
C, are going out into communities to 
be leaders. They are going to meet 
and work with graduates of other col- 
leges and universities and unless our 
men show the snap and proper educa- 
tion along cultural lines then the re- 
sults which should be accomplished by 
them will not be. 

My only regret is that the President 
and Trustees did not ask for twice as 
much as they did and in that way push 
the good cause along. 

Let every true undergraduate and 
alumnus come out and convince the 
Governor that our college is being run 
by the best President and Board of 
Trustees of any college in the United 
States. Show him that we mean 
business by "Boosting Old Aggie," 

Very truly yours, 

E. Farnham Damon, 1910. 

Upland, California, 



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MEN'S STORE 




DUDLEY 

oirrriTTEK in 

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The College Drug Store 




•The 5tST In Ttic World' 
Write for cataloge. 



Charles H. Dudley 

HANOVKR, 

Agent, HAZEN *14 



N. H. 



Til 
1,1! 



The College Signal. Tuesday. March 12. 19H. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, March 12, 191 3. 



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GENUINE - THOMAS • PHOSPHATE ■ POWDER 

(Basic Slag Meal) 

Grows Big Red Apples and Other Pruits 

TROPHIES WON BY USERS OF 

Genuine - Thomas - Phosphate - Powder 

A r Til I ^— 

GREAT NEW ENGLAND FRUIT SHOW 
Held at Boston. Mass.. October 33-28, 191 1 

International Apple Shipper*' A»8oclatlon*» Cup for HcM Cmmercial Kx 

hibitof !'acke<l Kruil Won by < onyers I ,um. (. A Drew. M«r . ( onn. 
Silver Cup for Be»t Display of Baldwin Apples .»tfer«-<| hv <;overnor 

Foss of Massnchuselts. Won by T. K. Winsor. KlH«te Isl.nd 
Silver Shield for Beat Exhibit of Rhode Island Clreeninjc* ..fferrd by 

C.overnor I'rUhier, of Kho.le Island. Won by I K W uiM.r Klio.l.- I.sland. 
S25 00 Cash »or Best Barrel of King Apples offered by W vK r. Douglas 

Company, of Connecticut. Won by Klij.il, Rogers Connect., ni 
First Prize for Best Barrel of Rhode Island (ireenlnss. Won by Mijah 

Rogers, Connecticut. .. , . 

First Priie $50.00 Best 5 Boxes of Apples. Any Variety or Varieties. 

Won bv Conver's Farm, C. A. Drew, Manager. Connea.rut 
Second Prize $25.00 for Best 5 Boxes of Apple*. Any Variety or 

Varietie». Won by N. S. Winsor. Rhode Island. 
First Prize -Best Box Exhibit of Apples. Won by Conyer's Farm. (i. A. 

Drew, Manager. Connecticut 
Silver nedal-Best Packed Exhibit of Apples. Won by Conyer s harm. 

(;, A. Drew. Manager. Connecticut. 
First Prize Best Box of Rhode Island GreeninK». Won by 1 K. 

Winsor, Rhode Island. 
SweepsUkes for Best Box of Apples Packed for Market $75.00. Won 

bv Conyer's Farm. C, A. Drew, Manager, ConnecUiut 
Beriin Prize $25.00 Cash and Silver Medal. Won by Consers harm, 

(, A. Drew, Manager, Connecticut „ . ^ k. . ir .. 

Connecticut Pomological Society Silver Medal for Best Table of Fruit. 

Won by Conver-s Farm. (,. A. Drew. (;eneral Manager^ onnect,cn, 

Massachusetts Agricultural College Sr*P«'•^" '?;',JJ^'^ra"f.eV"conn 
Number of Prizes. Won t>y ( onyer s Harm, (.A. Diew. Man.iger. Conn. 

Numerous Other Frizes. W.,n by above an<l «tl,er users (Jenuine Tl...n>,s l-h.>srl„.te |-.,w,t„ 

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ALUMNI NOTES 

'88.— Mr. and Mrs. Herbert C. 
Bliss spent the month of February at 
Holly Inn PInehurst, N. C. ' 

•96. — When the" Holeing Through" 
of the tunnel for the New York city 
Aqueduct was connpleted, recently, 
ceremonies were held 1,100 feet 
below the Hudson river. Mayor 
Gaynor and many other officials were 
present. The occasion was made 
memorable by speeches, dining-car 
; collations en route to the tunnel, etc. 
"The headings of the East and West 
shafts of the tunnel came together In a 
very satisfactory manner, with only a 
few inches variance at joining, while 
the overground and underground hori- 
zontal measurements between the 
shafts were only three-sixteenths of 
an inch apart. Those In charge of the 
Hudson River tunntl have overcome 
almost insurmountable obstables and 
have solved its problems with com- 
inenaable success " The cross-sec- 
tion of this aqueduct is 17 feet, while 
the largest of the famous Roman aque- 
ducts was probably five feet by three. 
The Division Engineer in this project 
is Frank L. Clapp. 

'02. -Arthur L. Dacy is the authoi 
Bulletin 136 published during the 
month of February by the West Vir- 
ginla University Agricultural Experi- 
ment station. Morgantown. W. Va. 
This bulletin Is entitled "The Apple 
Orchard from PUnting tj Bearing 
Age," Is well illustrated and the sub- 
ject logically present(?d. A discussion 
of the case of bearing urchards has 
been resereed for a future oulietin. 
Students of pomology In tnis institution 
will do wii, to secure Mr. Dacy's 
bulletin. 

•04.— John W. Gregg has been 
appointed professor of landscape gar- 
dening at the head of a strong depart- 
ment in Pennsylvania State college. 

'05.— W. B. Hatch in charge of 
landscape gardening construction work 
in Rnode Island has recently been 
visiting friends and relatives In 
Amherst. 

•05.— Born Jan. 31. a daughter. 
Alice Josephine, to Mr. and Mrs. W. 
M. Sears. Mr. Sears Is at present 
manager of th^ John A. Gammons 
farm. East Providence. 

NINETEEN-TEN. 

Rodolphus H. Allen, 565 June 
Street, Fail River, graduate student 
Massachusetts Agricultural college. 

I Ross E. Annis, 18 Oakland Street, 
Natick, civil engineer. 

Robert P. Armstrong, Canton, N.Y., 
assistant professor of Horticulture, 
! St. Lawrence university. 

Dexter E. Bailey, Brookings, S. 
I Dak., assistant in South Dakota Agri- 
! cultural Experiment station. 



I 

and am interested in NEW ENGLAND 
AGRICULTURE and have devoted a 
Special Department of my business to 
the handling of FARMS and COUN- 
TRY HOMES with F. P. MARSTON, 
N. H '81, as Manager. Correspondence 
solicited. Send for RAYMOND'S RED 
LETTER, Farm and Country Home 
Edition. Reliable agents wanted. 



T. H. RAYMOND 



Central Square, 



CamliriJge, Mass. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

IJKIVTAI^ WOO .X IS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hot' as: 
»tolM./^.^l« !.(«<> to fSK*. Ad. 



FOR FARMS ! 

Big, Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building Lots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W. R BROWN 

Savings Bank Bl'k, 

Amherst. • Mats 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

Hiirh-Gradc College Work 
LAUNDRY 



Shirts. 
Collars, 
Cuffs. - 
Plain wash. 
Same, rough dry. 



10 15c 

2C 

ac 

40c per ilo/ 

- »5c per doA 



Ralph R Parker, agent. C. S. C. House. 

S5 Pleasant St. 
Frani is S. Madison, agent for 1015 and 

short course, Vet. Lab. 
DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 
Fred S Merrill, agent, C. S. C. House 

85 Pleasant St. 
Put full name and address on laundry 




THIS CATAL06UE 
SHOULD BE 
IN THE HANDS 
OF EVERY ONE 
INTERESTED IN 

ATHLETIC SPORT 

MMll*'<i Krf-r 

Kxperlenced u»er< i 
*ixrf that Wright i 
9i. Dit«on articlM 
Are superior. Th*'» 
are desiRned and . 
made bv men who i 
arc experts and who 1 
know how to use the 
goods themselve* | 



Complete Equipment for Lawn 
Tennis, Base Ball, Oolf, Cricket, 
Track and Field Sports, Basket 
Ball, Foot Ball and Lawn Clames 



Wright & Ditson 
Lawn I enni« Guide 
10 Cents 



Wright & l)if>ion 
Base Ball Guide 
10 Cents 



Justice C. Bailey. Wareham, hor- 
ticulturist. 



Francis S. 

I; Ware, farmer. 



Beeman. Box 122, 



To tave time address our nearest stere 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

444 WashinKton 5t., Boston, Hass. 

New YORK CniCAOO 

22 Warren St. 119 N. Wabash Ave 

SAN FRANCISCO 

359 Market .*it, 

PROVIDENCe, R. 1. CAMBRIIKIE. MASS. 

76 Weybosset St. Harvard Square | 




Comi. Vailey SL Rj. Lines 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul* 
tural de|>artment. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations,violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

37 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



Jonathan P. Blaney. 235 Hum- 
phrey Street, Swampscott, landscape 
gardener. 

Louis Brandt, Urbana, 111.. Instructor 
In landscape gardening, University of 
Illinois 

Henry A. Brooks. 102 B Street 
N. E., Washington, D. C, draughts- 
man. 

Sumner C. Brooks, 28 Northamp- 
ton Road, Amherst. 

Louis C. Brown, Brldgewater. 

Edward J. Burke, Hadley, Instructor 
in Agriculture. 

Walter R. Clarke, Milton-on-Hud- 
son, N, Y., fruit grower. 

William A. Cloues, Lyndon. Vt.. 
Instructor in Agricultural High school. 

Henry T. Cowles. Arecebo, Pcrto 
Rico, teacher. 

Edward F. Damon, Upland, Cal. 
Lawrence S. Dickinson. Amherst, 
civil engineer. 

Roger S. Eddy, 37 Parkman Street, 
Dorchester. 

John N. Everson, Chrome. N. J., 
Analytical Chemist, American Agricul- 
tural Chemical company. 

Raymond J. Fiske. Bureau of Edu- 
cation, Manila. P. I. 

Joslah C. Folsom.BlUerlca, farmer. 

Henry R. Francis, Culver, Ind., 
superintendent of grounds. Culver Mil- 
itary academy. | 

Horace W. French, East Charle 
moiit, farmer. 

Frank T. 
farmer. 

Warren W. 
farmer. 




THE 
SMOOTHEST 



|V4USIC liath charms — add a pipeful of 
1 VI Velvet and you are a whole orchestra. 
Such is the pleasure of good tobacco. 
Velvet, the tenderest leaf — aged in the old 
warehouse for two years — a slow, sombre, 
lime-process of mellowing — in which all 
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without bite — music without discorr^I 
Velvet is known to be the most carefully 
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At cU dealers. 

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CHICAGO 







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full 2 oz. tins 




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New Easter Suit ? 

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All the latest styles and cuts. Your 
choice of too samples for a Spring or 
Summer Suit. If you want something 
classy, see White '15, Hunt's Block. 

H. e. WHITE 



WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 

In so far as our bencfils arc mutual. 

THE AMHERST GAS COMPANY 

Everything Electrical 



SOMETHING NEW ! ^^y^^^^^ a„j| (^^||^g^ Photographers . . . 



Not the same old line 
Better inquire about that 

Also a few others for comfort and 
economy. 

WOOLLEY '14 

i SMOK rom. HARD •CMVICC 



If 70a wsnt to t>e 

80LID WITH THK (ilKI.H 

you must have your clothe* pre»:«<i •nd cleaned 

AT BPSTBXXf 'S 



11 Amttj Mt. 



Maroon Store 




LOO ALLY: 5» Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadley, Mass. 



Main Offkk : 

1546-1 548 Broadway, 

New York City 



These Studios offer the best skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment ol)tainabIe 



ICE CREAM, 



^i^ted otUy ffvm t A. M. to 4 A.M. 



Pressing and Cleaning a uptclaliy 

Moat liberal ticket •yetem in town 



As I am directir connected with a Whol«Rale 
Ilousc. I can 

SAVE TOU MONEY ON CLOTHES 

Will be pleaned to show iianipl)-* and ntylesof 
Winter Suitt and Overooau. 

■. B. WHITK, 1910. Hunt* Block 

apowriicM 



I STEAM m TING. Telephone $»-4. 

M.D. aiLMAN. C. A. MOrriCT. GAS FITTISf,, 1 INNING. 



Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 
IN 

CONFECTIONERY. 

t07 to tU Maim Strbbt. 

WojLCBSTSR, Mass. 



PLUMBERS. 



specialty of Kepairini; 

Church Winoows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lkai> Lkjhts, itc. 

6 Clifton Ave., AMHKRST, MASS. 



■t 



Ml 



i. 
f 



<\ 



8 



The CoUcfe Signal, Tuesday, March 12,1912. 



in. J. Leporie, idg. 



Proprietors of 



I10F0-LIVEBY-PB8E 



Rear Draper Hotel 
Northampton. 



Tel. 183. 




ASK YOUR 

STATIONER 

FOR 



Ward's Fountain I'ens. Fine Papers 
and Knvelopes, Students' Supplies. 
Send for samples of Kngraved Invita- 
tions, Class and Fraternity Paper, 
Hanquet .Menus, Visiting Cards, etc. 



SAMUEL WARD CO. 



WflBD'S 



5763 Franklin Street 
BOSTON 



All Styles 0/ 



SWEATERS 
AND JERSEYS 



TRADE m ^^^^ MARK 






Complete Line of 



Athletic Goods 
and BANNERS 



THE 



Massachusetts Agricultural Gollese 



Trains men for attractive positions in vocations 
that are not overcrowded. 

Tuition is free to residents of Massachusetts. 

Necessary expenses are moderate. 

X OATALOG WILL BE SENT ON REQUEST 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



VIoUp, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

LKNS OKINUINO 

/"«// h'Mt 0/ College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Tracic Association, 

Hoclcey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Thirteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Fourteen Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Rifle Club. 

Dramatic Society, 

Debating Society, 

Public Speaking Courtcil, 



H. C. Walker, President 

Geo. H. Chapman, Secretary 

J. W. Covin, h^anager 

R. J. Borden. Manager 

R. T. Beers, Manager 

H H. Wooa, Manager 

S. M. Jordan, Manager 

O. G. Anderson, Manager 

E. S. Clark, Manager 

F. S. Madison, President 

L. S. Caldwell. President 

J, D. French, Manager 

F. S. Madison, President 

G. W. Ells, Secretary 

Geo. Zabriskie, Manager 

J. M. Heald, President 

T. J. Moreau, President 



PROMINENCE 

Is given here to the fact that we take 

special care in the posing of 

subjects in order to bring 

out all the good 

features. 

Light and shade is skilfully diffused. 

This and the excellent finish makes 

our PHOTOGR.APHS masterpieces 

of reproductive art. 

SHILLARE'S STUDIO. 

142 Main St, Noniiiiplon 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST, MASS. 



17 South College 



If you are getting the 

THE MOST FOR YOUR MONEY 

then you are eating at the 

O. K., NEXT TO POST OFFICE 

.». W. BCIUSK, Prop. 

Have you tried our 2S-cent Dinners? 
If not, why not? 



Tlhen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CI-EANSING. 

PRESSING. 

REPAIRING. 

UulckrM service, B«»«t Work, Lowe»t Prt.« 

All woik carefully done. Work called for and 
delivered. KttnXt' overcoat*, suit*. panU and 
coatt. Ladiea' line linen suita a specialty. 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 

Kear Nash Bl'k. Amherst. Tel. No. y^* 



CARS 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Ftne Repairing a Specialty 

Custom Work 

Holland's Block, Phoenix Row 



telephone Connection 

TAILOR AND PRESSER 

Fall and Winter Suits 

Chevrons and Stripes 

Put on Military Suits 

Full Dress Suits to Rent 

Gents' Furnishings 



Leave AQQIE COLLEQE for HOL* 
YOKE on each MOUR. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AOOIE COL- 
LEUE at 7 and 37 mim. past each 
HOUR. 

Spectel C«r« at RMWoiMble Ratea 

AIHERSI & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts .Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of "(iold Medal Uniforms. " 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



THE NEW ENGUND NEWSPAPER 

All the news and the Truth 
about it, in the :: 

Springfield Repabllcan 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 
News fully ref)orted. 

BEST SPORTING PAGES 

The Weekly Republican will be sent 

free for one month to anyone 

wishing to try it. 

Daily, $8. Sunday, p. tVetily, V- 



THE COLLEGE SIGNA. 



Vol. XXIl. 



MASSACHUSETTTS AORI CULTURAL COLLCOEI 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, Maich 19, 1912. 



No. 22 



SIGNAL BANQUET 



Held at Prospect House Friday. Prof. 
R. W. Neal Gives Address of Bvenin|^. 

The Signal Board held its first 
annual banquet at the Prospect House 
Friday evening. Appropriate menus 
indicated an unusually good "line-up" 
of courses after which followed the 
usual smoltes and toasts. J. A. Har- 
low '12 acted as toastmaster In the 
absence of the editor-in-chief, A. C. 
Brett,who was unable toattend. After a 
short Introductory talk Harlow intro- 
duced Jesse Carpenter '12 as an 
authority on the duties of managing 
editors. O. G. Anderson '13 followed 
with some practical ideas as to the 

nprovement of the alumni department 
of the paper, "The comoeiltors'' 
were mentioned briefly by M. C. Pratt 

12, and C. E. Wheeler '14 outlined 
the duties of the "Printer's Devil." 
R. N. Hallowell '12 outlined the 
Signal's future as it apoeared to him. 
The main speaker of the evening 
was Prof. Robert W. Neal who spoke 
on the subject "The Opportunities 
offered by college journalism." 
After a few Impromptu toasts the even- 

rg wai brcught to a close. 



EASTERN CHAMPIONS I DEDICATION OF ARENA 



WILLIAMS PRESIDENT SPEAKS 

President Garfield of Williams col- 
lege was the speaker at Assembly on 
Wednesday afternoon. The .subject 
of his address was, "Some Phases of 
Things Political. " 

In developing his subject F.esideni 
Garfield explained three different exper- 
iments in popular government which 
are to be found in English, in German 
and In American history. The first, 
the great reform acts of England gave 
the right of ballot to the English people, 
as a whole. Universal suffrage here 
proved far from perfect and voting not 
the whole duty of citizenship. The 
ser.ond was the autocratically governed 
city of Berlin, where the administrative 
power is vested in an autocratic body 
called the maglstrat. The third was 
our own city of Washington In which 
the citizen has no ballot. The last 
two are instances of popular govern- 
ment without universal suffrage, yet 
these two cities are among the best 
governed in the whole world. 

Mr. Garfield enumerated some 
deductions which might be made from 
'hese experiments. First, popular 
government Is not dependent on form ; 

econd, exercise of suffrage isn't 
•essential to popular government, and 
third, popular government does not 
depend on the exercise of popular 
power. In closing he said that it is 

he duty of college men to train their 



•' Af gie " Rifle Shots to Meet Iowa for 
National Title. 

The Massachusetts 'Aggie" rifle 
team is now the worthy holder of the 
championships of the Easterh division \ 
of the Intercollegiate rifle shooting 
league with a record of eleven victories 
and no defeats. Princeton went down 
In the last match without a struggle the 
score being 958 to 907. The rifle 
team has given M. A. C. a certain 
amount of distinction through Its good 
work. But the race is not yet finished. 
This week Saturday the team will 
shoot against Iowa, the champions of 
the Western division, for the national 
title. The Westerners have been 
shooting in fine form all season. The 
match is bound to be ctose. Never- 
theless, both teams are placed on an 
equal footing and the men with the 
mcst nerve will W'n. Captain Martin 
will be the official judge at this end. 
Each man will use four targets, five 
shots to a target. The team has 
shown a slow but sure improvement in 
the last three matches and should reach 
its maximum score on Saturday. 



BRIDES TO COACH 



Stock Judging Pavilion Named After Old Yale Star Signed to Coach Foot- 



Former Trustee Orinnell. 

The new animal husbandry building 
was dedicated Wednesday afternoon 
being given the name of "The Grinnell 
Arena" in honor of the late James S. 
Grinrell, who was for 22 years a 
trustee of the college. 

President Kenyon L. Butterfleld 
made the address of welcome and said 
in part ■ This is not a large, but a 
significant building. First, from the 
standpoint of the college, it supplies a 
long-standing need for class work and 



VAUDEVILLE 

In place of the usual Social Union 
enl-'.rtainment Saturday evening, the 
Dratnatic society will give a vaudeville 
smoker In the Drill hall. As pre- 
viously announced, the affair will be 
conducted as an amateur night that is, 
any student is urged to participate in 
the performance, whether or not he 
be a member of the Dramatic society. 
H. D. Allen '14 has charge of the 
entertainment and has provided several 
very pleasant sketches. These with 
other equally good original acts, make 
up a program which will afford amuse- 
ment to every man in college. Every 
man is invited to attend. There will 
be no admission charged. 




(COTItiMMd on pM« 3.] 



TWELVE HUNDRED VISITORS 

The fourth annual Farrrers' week, 
the most successful ever held here, 
was brought to a close Friday noon. 
The various exhibits were more full 
and there were more and better speak- 
ers upon the program than ever before. 
Between Monday noon and the end of 
the week 1075 visitors registered and 
it is estimated that besides these 125 
neglected to do to. The attendance 
shows an increase over last year's reg- 
istration of over 25%. Plans are 
already under way for a bigger program 
next year. 



kadlr^.r:Amnir 



Grinnell Arena. 

general practice in livestock manage- 
ment. Second, not only the regular 
students, but short course men and 
visiting livestock associations will be 
provided for from now on. Third, it 
is a significant building from an indus- 
trial standpoint. The dairy and live- 
stock Industry of this state must be 
built up, and it Is only another step in 
the right direction when we dedicate 
such a building as this. 

The chairman of the building com- 
mittee of the board of trustees, Wil- 
liam H. Bowker of Concord, gave the 
dedicatory address. He sketched the 
life of James S. Grinnell and empha- 
sized the fact that he did much to pro- 
mote the improvement of livestock in 
Massachusetts. Mr. Bowker read an 
appreciation of Mr. Grinnell prepared 
by his townsman. Chief Justice Aiken 
of Greenfield. Mr. Grinnell was grad- 
uated from Amherst in 1842 and 
studied law at Harvard, but did not 
devote himself to his profession, pre- 
ferring agricultural science. He was 
employed in the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and was particu- 
larly interested In sheep husbandry. 
He was vice-president of the board of 
trustees of this college. He died In 
1900. 

Dr. Carl W. Gay of the University 
of Pennsylvania made the formal 
address. His subject was "The Live- 
stock Industry In New England." He 



ball Team for Three Years. 

Through the Athletic Board, Manager 
J. Warren Covill has secured the ser- 
vices of Dr. Arthur E. Brides, Yale 
'09. to direct the M. A. C. football 
team for a term of several years. The 
contract has been signed and com- 
mtncing with the coming season Dr. 
Brides will be in charge for three 
years. The former Yale line coach is 
a practising physician of Brockton, 
Mass., and the team will thus have 
com^tent medical attention when 
necessary. 

While at Yale, Dr Brides played 
on the varsity football team for the 
entire four years, successfully holding 
every position but quarter-back, Upon 
graduation in 1909 he became coach 
at the University of North Carolina. 
That he made good there is evident 
from the fact that the team which had 
lost nine out of ten games the previous 
season, under his coaching won nine 
out of the ten games played. 

Last year, while studying at Yale 
Medical school he coached the varsity 
line and is thus well acquainted with 
the coaching system in vogue there 
that has tutned out winning teams 
year after year. Although receiving 
many offers, especially from colleges 
fn the Middle West, Dr. Brides pre- 
fers to remain in the East and Mana- 
ger Covill was able to secure him. 



Professor Hasbrouck entertained the 
members of the New Jersey club at 
dinner, Thursday evening. 



TO BROADEN ITS SCOPE 

The college Y. M. C. A. held Its 
annual meeting Ihursday evening and 
elected the following officers for the 
coming year : President. N. Paul Lar- 
sen, 1913; vice-president, Lloyd G. 
Davies, 1914: corresponding secre- 
tary, John T. Lesure, 1913; record- 
ing secretary, William A. Davis, 
1914; treasurer, Richard H. Powers, 
1914. A committee was appointed 
consisting of Madison 1912, Noyes 
1912 and Griggs 1913 to draw up a 
new constitution which will be broader 
in Its scope and which will enable the 
association to fill a much more import- 
ant place In student Itfe. This may 
necessitate withdrawing from the 
International Y. M. C. A. although 
remaining allied with it. Whatever 
the new organization, it is the purpose 
of the new officers to make the asso- 
ciation mean more to the college than 
it has in the past, and remove the 
said that there is not enough attention j obstacles that now stand in the way of 
given to animal husbandry by the ^ its greater efficiency. 

farmer ; livestock Is the main support -^ — - 

of agriculture. The last address was At a meeting of the Senior class 
given by Prof. J. A. McLean, hia sub- Thursday morning.the commencemert 



m 



ject being "Livestock atM. A. C." 



committee was chosen. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, March 19. 1912. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, March 19, 1912. 




Alden C Brett. 

Hamilton give up theirduties as editor- 
in-chief and busine'is manager respec- 
tively. Both made the board in their 
freshman year. 

Besides his position on this paper 
Mr. Brett has held many honors dur- 
ing his college course. Among these 
are president of his class, positions on 
various class teams and editor-in-chief 
of the \9\2 Index. At present he is 
chairman of the Informal committee 
and captain of tennis. Mr. Dodge has 




THE RETIRING BOARD j SUNDAY CHAPEL 

With the passing of the 1912 Signal Ray Stannard Baker, the well 
Board Alden C. Brett of North Abing- 1 known magazine writer, was the 
don and Albert W. Dodge of South I speaker at Sunday CJiapel. He used 

for his subject "The Spirit of Progres- ' 
siveness in American Life." 

He first called attention to ^he ' 
problems and conditions of economic' 
and political unrest which were not 
only local and national, but world- 
wide. A New York newspaper put 
the question "What is the matter with i 
business?" and a large proportion of 
those who responded answered "Poli- 
tics." But the prevailing unrest goes 
deeper than politics. Investigation 
must be made among the deep, silent 
forces that are at work among the 
people. 

He took, for example, the hook 
worm disease prevalent in the South. 
When this "laziness germ" disease 
was discussed and attacked by the 
scientists there were those who said 
It idjured business. But fortunately 
there were men who dared face the 
truth and were willing to struggle 
against prejudice and ignorance. 

They had three great planks in their 
platform. 

First : To know all there Is to 
know about the disease : this is the 
scientific spirit. 

Second : To cure men and women : 
the spirit of unselfish service to man- 
kind. 

Third: To prevent future infection 
by educating a whoie people to better 
"I'-'hods of sanitation. 

ills shows the working of the 
true spirit of progressiveness which is 
merely the superficial expression of a 
deep-sea(ed movement of the whole 
people. True progressivness bases itself 
In the first place upon scientific fact and 
spirit. In the second place it is in- 
spired with the highest appreciation of 

e value of human life. In the third 
place the spirit is always marked by a 
wide vision of the relationships of 
men. 

Against the so-called " stand-pat- 
ters" at the present time two other 
powerful grouDs: the progressive 
and the socialist — parties which aim 
for publicity, public service and for! 
getting all the facts before the people. ' 
They have breadth of vision and stand 
for human rights. 

Even though Socialism is revolu- 
tionary, leading at once to radical 
economic changes while progressive- 
is evolutionary, building its machin- 
ery very carefully before attempt- 
ing economic results — there must be 
a coming together of these for one 
end — progress. As Governor Wilson 
of New Jersey said: 

"If someone would draw together 
the liberal elements of both parties in 
the country he could build up a party 
which could not be beaten in a genera- 
tion." 

It is certain that the spirit of pro- 
gressivness is going to win. And with 
such a spirit prevailing, there must be 



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HARRISON'S NURSERIES... 

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All prospective buyers are invited to visit the 

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We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
■ PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



Albert W. Dodge. 

played on several of his class teams, is 
on the fraternity conference and was 
on the board of editors of his class 
book. 



JUNIOR SMOKER 

Thursday evening the second Junior 
smoker was held at the Union Room. 
Cards, smokes, dancing and refresh- 
ments renewed good-fellowship, and 
the divided interests of Junior year 
were forgotten. A class orchestra fur- 
nished music. The opinions expressed, 
forecast another "smoker" in the near 
future. 

WILLIAMS PRESIDENT SPEAKS 

(Continued frcm pape I .) 

minds to think straight, and to grasp 
the principles of government that they 
may apply them to the great problems | 
of today and efficiently fill their posi- 
tions as leaders in the world at large. 



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